Author Topic: First Row With a Farmer  (Read 1322 times)

DevonDave

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 701
Re: First Row With a Farmer
« Reply #15 on: 15:29:13, 23/11/17 »
I have been fortunate never to have an adverse reaction from a farmer, but what I do find annoying is when there is a gate across a ROW that has been tied so tightly with binder twine that it can't be undone.  I don't like cutting it as there is then no means of securing the gate afterwards, so the only option is to climb over.  I once came across a gate that had been placed across a track, not on hinges but tied with binder twine on both ends.  This meant that the gate was completely unstable when trying to climb over.  As I got one leg over the top it suddenly swung away from me and I spun round and almost landed on my back.  I wasn't amused.   >:(   

Lee in Doncaster

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 785
Re: First Row With a Farmer
« Reply #16 on: 15:36:47, 23/11/17 »
I think the most frequent “unsatisfactory” interaction I have with farmers is poor signage, evidently deliberately damaged or removed.


 In my experience..that (the deliberate removal of signs) really isn’t that unusual...especially when near farmhouse itself. Certainly a lot more common than face to face “spats”.


Yes, I agree; the removal of signs is a problem - sometimes you can spot the countermeasures though [signs placed on the other side of the road for example]
Walking every week in the Peak District...or somewhere else   http://peakwalking.blogspot.com

barewirewalker

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2563
Re: First Row With a Farmer
« Reply #17 on: 12:36:57, 24/11/17 »
I think the most frequent “unsatisfactory” interaction I have with farmers is poor signage, evidently deliberately damaged or removed.


 In my experience..that (the deliberate removal of signs) really isn’t that unusual...especially when near farmhouse itself. Certainly a lot more common than face to face “spats”.


Link that to deliberately abused way marks, especially shot damaged and you will start to add up some of the of the indicators of access hostility. Where off road signage such as fingerposts are damaged by
hedge cutters there is a hint of collusion between contractors and landowners.
Councils are remiss if they do not claim back this damage because allows this type of attitude to embed in local attitude.
This may seem far fetched but it becomes more feasible, when you understand that the people concerned meet up at the same functions and hospitality events.


A classic examples is the Ceriog valley, where the McAlpine family established shooting interests several decades ago, the legacy is an embedded bad attitude that can be found in many forms, even one farmers wife posting on the No 10, website that it is unfair they cannot close a lengthy footpath because a short length has been eroded by the Ceriog river.[size=78%] [/size]
[size=78%]
[/size]
I got insight into this when I was initially approached by irate farmer, who we later found had a member of his family nursed by Mrs BWW.


Trouble is these sort of attitudes can remain in an area for decades even generations. The particular footpath could be a key in a X Wales route starting at Gobowen rail station.
BWW
Their Land is in Our Country.

Peter

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3638
Re: First Row With a Farmer
« Reply #18 on: 21:19:15, 24/11/17 »

Possibly what helps me is that during the 28 years I  worked with the public as a service engineer I learnt never to argue with anyone. Let them have their say without interrupting them, remain calm and polite, don't raise your voice, but stand firm. Usually thery will back down.


Being  very tall probably helps too  ::)
Peter
sometimes I fall off the learning curve....
Join: Yorkshire Dales Walking Buddies
https://www.facebook.com/groups/1783012625307

mananddog

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3090
Re: First Row With a Farmer
« Reply #19 on: 13:10:22, 05/12/17 »

It has been 30 years since I had a run in with a farmer. I have always found them fine and for the last 13 years I have usually had my dog with me. I have had more problems with golfers! In 1200 miles of walking on JOGLE the only people who had a go at me for walking with my dog over "their" land were golfers at Crewe golf course. In my previous house I used to run over a golf course and I am sure the golfers actively tried to hit people crossing the course.


However, some walkers are a real problem as we all know, seeing the countryside trashed is a daily occurrence for me on my walks. This weekend on Kinder there was a huge pile of human poo and toilet paper in the rocks at Kinder Low, litter in many places and loads of empty beer bottles at the top of Gindsbrook Clough. The people who do this had to be "walkers" because it took effort to get there.


I once heard a crashing sound on a shoot near my house and found a bloke pulling the door off one of the pheasant pens. He told me he was doing it to set them free. I pointed out that the pen has pop-holes so they could come and go as they please from the pen which is where the food is and offers protection from predators and he has now ensured that the foxes would get in. I asked him if he felt so caring for birds he might go and pull the doors off the pens off the free-range chicken farm.

Lemmy

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 31
Re: First Row With a Farmer
« Reply #20 on: 21:28:17, 08/12/17 »
I'm 6'5" and 275lbs.  By the time any farmers have walked right up to me they've had a change of heart about getting gobby  ;D . Just as well, because I'm a weakling scaredy cat, albeit a very large one  O0

barewirewalker

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2563
Re: First Row With a Farmer
« Reply #21 on: 12:36:01, 09/12/17 »
I am only 5'4", not as impressive but although I have had quite number of confrontations my hope is always to have a reasoned conversation. Mostly the hectoring attitude of the person with fixed and entrenched reasoning is a result propaganda circulated within the closed community of farmer or landowner. The lines of argument used are further embedded in the mind of the person who works the land or rearing lifestock is based on long periods alone with thoughts running through the mind without challenge of opposing reason, that is usually the farmer, whereas the occupier/landowner's reasoning is rigidly fixed if an age old assumption of supremacy and is flawed with arrogance.


The visitor is the farmers customer, whereas the landowner experiences a sense of threat to his possession. The landowner is vulnerable because their policies are being justified by being the custodians of the countryside, however the majority paying their taxes which support the rural economy are the visitors.


You will wrong foot most challenges if you manage to identify the source of grievance that motivates the hostile approach of those who occupy our countryside. I think it a good thing to try to broaden the issues brought into these arguments.
BWW
Their Land is in Our Country.