Author Topic: Backpack weight  (Read 5735 times)

old geezer

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Backpack weight
« on: 11:50:08, 07/02/17 »
What's the lightest you've backpacked,including tent,sleeping bag,cooking gear,change of clothing,wash kit,repair kit and emergency rations.I can't get lower than 15 kg.

fernman

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Re: Backpack weight
« Reply #1 on: 13:00:37, 07/02/17 »
15kg suggests to me you're either carrying too many heavy things that could be replaced by lighter items or you're carrying more things than you need to.

Mine weighs 9kg for 3- to 4-day trips in May and September, including 4.5 days' food and a litre of water, but unlike you no change of clothes (other than underwear), no repair kit and no emergency rations - I've never run out of food yet.

I've worked hard in the last 2 - 3 years at reducing my pack weight, one reason being I'm in a similar age group to you, as suggested by your user name. I could certainly reduce it more, but there are financial constraints.
Check my gear list at https://snowdoniabackpacking.wordpress.com/gear-list/
and further comments at https://snowdoniabackpacking.wordpress.com/backpacking/reducing-pack-weight/
« Last Edit: 13:09:34, 07/02/17 by fernman »

old geezer

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Re: Backpack weight
« Reply #2 on: 15:06:49, 07/02/17 »
Hello Fernman.I looked at you're list and the fact is you carry more items than me.I guess the difference is in the weight of individual items.Your tent and sleeping bag both weigh less than mine and are quite a bit more expensive so you get what you pay for.Unfortunately i have to budget according to my means.I am 76 and live on my pension so i will have grin and litterally bear it.One good thing about backpacking is you have no timetable so can pack it in when it gets too tough.Im hoping to start the PW in mid May.I,ll take my time and reckon on about 19 to 21 days.If i do it quicker i'll follow the St Cuthberts way to Wooler and Holy Isle.

mananddog

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Re: Backpack weight
« Reply #3 on: 15:43:23, 07/02/17 »
My long distance backpacking gear is 8Kg total max plus food and water. Short duration - less than a week is about 5Kg.

sussamb

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Re: Backpack weight
« Reply #4 on: 15:51:51, 07/02/17 »
Im hoping to start the PW in mid May.I,ll take my time and reckon on about 19 to 21 days.

I'm starting on the 18th so we should meet around Horton, as I'm aiming to be there in 5 days, I'll look out for you  :)
Where there's a will ...

Jac

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Re: Backpack weight
« Reply #5 on: 16:07:14, 07/02/17 »

Check my gear list at https://snowdoniabackpacking.wordpress.com/gear-list/
and further comments at https://snowdoniabackpacking.wordpress.com/backpacking/reducing-pack-weight/
Really interesting especially how the little weight savings add up.
You mention 'tiny tubes of toothpaste', don't buy them - all dentists have a stash of sample tubes, just ask. They can be easily filled from your normal size tube when used up.
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gary m

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Re: Backpack weight
« Reply #6 on: 16:30:02, 07/02/17 »
one of the biggest weight savers is the tent itself, what tent do you use
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Owen

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Re: Backpack weight
« Reply #7 on: 20:15:54, 07/02/17 »
The big three weight wise are your tent, sleeping bag and rucksack, unfortunately their also the expensive items. Try looking at second hand it could half your base weight.   

Doddy

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Re: Backpack weight
« Reply #8 on: 20:44:36, 07/02/17 »

On LD paths I carry a base weight of 5.31 kg. I started On LD paths in 2004. I never had any traditional gear so bought lightweight from the off .I then carried about 8Kg with a Go-lite tarp.Over the years I have honed it to the present level. My gear is mainly from the US as I have experience there. The big three are: shelter, a TarpTent Notch, backpack, Zpacks ArcBlast, sleeping pad, 3/4 Klymit and Western Mountaineering Summerlite sleeping bag, silk liner and MLD superlite bivvy. This big three-ish amount to 1.98Kg.The bivvy can be seen as a luxury(!)as a second shelter but I have experience in storms/hurricanes so have belt and braces there for piece of mind. I can sleep through most any thing, apart from floods, knowing I am not going to wake up damp or worse. Ok for Spring and Autumn jaunts as well.
To shave grams becomes more expensive as you go. I could go below the magic 10lb (4.5Kg) if I bit the bullet and reduced toiletries and first aid kit to the bare minimum. I rationalise/excuse quite a range of those by thinking the energy toting those is worth it; energy/time can be wasted wandering about towns looking for items for hygiene/minor ailments.

craven50

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Re: Backpack weight
« Reply #9 on: 22:33:09, 07/02/17 »
What's the lightest you've backpacked,including tent,sleeping bag,cooking gear,change of clothing,wash kit,repair kit and emergency rations.I can't get lower than 15 kg.

I personally have all lightweight gear. although people use a tarp although I don't I use a laser competition tent. My gear without food is about 7.5 kg (could get it lighter but prefer a bit of comfort). A weeks supply of food adds quite a lot another 4.5 kg. So in my opinion the food carried is the main weight factor as for water never carry it.

So your weight is not that bad depending what you are attempting. Reasonable for the CWT although for other LDWs weight can be shed. The PW et al for example food is not a problem so only 1 or 2 days supply is all that is needed
« Last Edit: 22:37:40, 07/02/17 by craven50 »
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old geezer

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Re: Backpack weight
« Reply #10 on: 10:00:49, 08/02/17 »
My main problem is i always think i'm being ripped off.I paid 90 in a sale for my oex evolution season 4 sleeping bag which weighs in at 2kg/4lb.Being as i am of "i remember i could get a car for that brigade",i think i should be able  to buy a similar one weighing half that.I do have another s/bag at 2lb that is only season 2 but as i say i'm 76 and feel the cold more than i use to.I may go back to that though,proberbly with bed socks.My tent is admitedly cheap and i might shop around for another one.It is a Vango Soul 2000 and i like it a lot.It is double skinned which i insist on.I used to have a one man bivouac single skin but the condensation counteracted the waterproofing.The tent weighs 2.5 kg/5lb.Second hand might be an idea though.I'll look on ebay.The suggestions above have been very helpfull.I am amazed how little some packs weigh,i don't think i'll manage to get down to 5 kg odd without making the walk unenjoyable,i like my comfort too much.I enjoyed the posts though,most helpful.

Doddy

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Re: Backpack weight
« Reply #11 on: 10:01:02, 08/02/17 »
Yes, food and water management is key to weight carried. A menu plan for what you need to carry, where you can resupply, obtain water or get a meal is key for me. Also what you are going to cook impacts on how you cook i.e the type of stove and amount of fuel carried.
 My comfort is not compromised by being lightweight it just costs more to get the lighter gear. Evidently there is silly-light where people do without to carry less but no need for that way off thinking. I am a senior.

I regularly tarped at one stage but had to carry an inner bug net and polycro floor so the combination came up to smaller tents or tarptents.
« Last Edit: 10:11:21, 08/02/17 by Doddy »

tonyk

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Re: Backpack weight
« Reply #12 on: 12:13:10, 08/02/17 »
 I would say that 12-15 kg sounds about right if you want to remain comfortable.In my experience you get used to carrying the load after a day or two and a kilo here or there dosen't make much difference.If your pack is a bit on the heavy side reduce your pace a little and that usually sorts things out.

 What don't want to do is to carry a really excessive load.This is a post I made on another forum about my first attempt at a long distance backpacking trip.

 "The Peakland Way was my first attempt at a long distance walk,March 1981.What an induction it was!Freezing nights spent in a single skin tent and living off Raven dehydrated food.It took me all day to do the ten miles to Wetton Mill and I was knackered.My pack weighed around 60lbs and I was wearing Hawkins boots which ripped my feet to shreds during the first five miles.I covered 38 miles in three days and quit at Barber Booth due to blisters and exhaustion."

 

 

forgotmyoldpassword

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Re: Backpack weight
« Reply #13 on: 18:20:05, 08/02/17 »
What's the lightest you've backpacked,including tent,sleeping bag,cooking gear,change of clothing,wash kit,repair kit and emergency rations.I can't get lower than 15 kg.


Honestly don't see this as a problem for trips, especially this time of year where there is a lot of extra winter weight due to clothing.


Three to four days food may be nearly 2kg, carried water may be 0.5-1kg at the low end.  I probably carry 5kg of clothing, maps and camp shoes if I'm doing long distance this time of year, including the pack.  Some of the expedition size backpacks have more robust carry systems which push them in to the 1.5-2kg size alone.  A sleeping system of  mid to high quality could be shy of 3.5-4kg for a mat, tent, stakes, bag and drysacks.  It'll cost you probably another 500 to drop this to 2kg, or 25p per gram.


Being realistic, you are on a budget and you want the most bang for your buck.  You can't buy a new rucksack until you downsize everything else, so stick with the rucksack, and forget about buying new for the time being.  Look on places like ebay, pick up some bargains, and first thing you want to focus on is the big four (sleeping bag, tent, rucksack and mat) - if you are happy with those, look at the 'comforts'.  Do you really need these? Would you rather have less 'comforts' but be more comfortable by carrying less?


I'd suggest using hiking poles if you don't already for heavy loads, and set a budget for how much you want to spend to change around your gear.  You don't need the newest, shiniest kit, but some improvements make a big difference.  Especially in the 'big four' listed above.  You said you have a new sleeping bag so forget about improving that, I'd personally look at a second hand lightweight tent and expect to pay something in the region of 200-300, as well as cutting the gear weight of what I'm carrying.


Overall you have two choices, the expensive way or the cheap way.  The expensive way is to replace some of the items you are taking, with lighter alternatives.  The cheap way is removing parts of your setup and realising you can do with less.


Lastly, don't be dazzled by ridiculously low pack weights and think you are Atlas by comparison.  There are many UL hikers who carry absolutely minimum emergency kit, a shockingly inadequate first aid kit for anything more than a small cut or blisters, no bothy bags nor ultralight emergency bivvies.  If they get in to trouble they are entirely reliant on walking off the mountain, or sending a friend for help.

Peter

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Re: Backpack weight
« Reply #14 on: 18:57:49, 08/02/17 »
It always amuses me to see the concerns over the weight you carry..
Given that I weigh some 58 Kilos too much before I put a pack on.  :-[
Peter
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