Author Topic: County Bagging: Norfolk (East Runton to Sheringham)  (Read 451 times)

Mel

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I've not been making much (any) progress with my County Bagging Project.  All "drive there-and-back-able in a day" Counties have been bagged time and time again and have well and truly been bagged to death....
 
.... Time for a new adventure  :)
 
I stuck my hand in my jar of counties and pulled out Norfolk.  Okay.  Not too far away (hhaaa).  That sounds like a fine contender for a long weekend away.  So, where to walk?  I leafed through my Country Walking mag collection of walks and spotted an East Runton to Sheringham walk of 7.5 miles.  Sorted  O0
 
So, on the Saturday after work, car packed with the tent and most of the rest of my house  ::)  (creature comforts and all that) I set off on the 4 hour .... FOUR HOUR  :o  journey.  Jeheeezus, it's only down the coast a bit from me (ish).  I coulda sailed there quicker  :D   In a very un-Yorksher-like fashion I stuck my hand in my pocket and paid the £1.50 bridge toll for a rather lovely drive over the Humber Bridge (note to self: must walk over it again now the east path has re-opened) and drove the full length of Lincolnshire on the most uninspiring roads ever.  SatNav took me through the heart of Lincoln which, I'm sure is a lovely place but not when you're driving through and there's a million roadworks and diversions in place that SatNav Did.Not.Like.One.Bit (note to self: don't return home this way).  Anyhow, more uninspiring and newly resurfaced (loose chippings) road turned a long and boring journey into a losing the will to live journey as everybody obeyed the 10mph speed limit for, like, FIFTY miles  :(  (slight exaggeration) (note to self: SERIOUSLY, don't return home this way).  The rest of the journey was uneventful barring a pit stop for a leg stretch when I realised I had my camping gear with me so didn't need to find a motorway type café thing for an overpriced cuppa  :)  (the Yorksher in me is back again). Once in Norfolk itself the rest of the journey was uneventful but interesting as I drove by signs for undiscovered yet familiar place names (thanks to uncled on this forum) and finally arrived at my campsite for the next couple of days.  Yes, it was a big, commercial site with static caravans, tourers, enormous tents, a playground and a site shop but it was on the cliff top and a short walk along the Norfolk Coast Path got me onto the beach.  My home for a couple of days:
 
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Luvvlie.  A nice little explore of the site and a wander into the village to see what's what probably clocked up a couple of miles of nice leg stretch before having a quiche, new potatoes and salad for my tea, washed down with a glass of wine, sat in the sunshine breathing in fresh, sea air.  Smashing  :)   I could feel the stress and upheaval of the past couple of months melting away.
 
The next day I was up at silly-o-clock, partly 'cos I was busting for a widdle and partly because the day was gearing up to be The Hottest Day Of The Year and the tent was getting uncomfortably warm.  Sitting in the early morning sunshine having a cuppa (waking everyone up with my whistling kettle  :D  ) no, joking, other people were up and about already, probably feeling the heat of the day as well. 
 
Sarnies made, flask filled, rucksack packed (including the flipflops), Viewranger set to record, .... and off I set.  I crossed the A149 and headed down Thains Lane:
 
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... a lovely, leafy, shady lane.  I reached a the bridge over rail track:
 
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... and headed towards Incleborough Hill.  Lots of flappy things, most too quick to be snapped but I got this Meadow Brown butterfly sunbathing on a Bramble:
 
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Over a stile I went and onto a little patch of Access Land that houses Incleborough Hill.  There was a little bit of welcomed breeze here:
 
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I re-entered some leafy-ness for the climb up the hill:
 
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... a short, steep little hill that pops you out into baking hot heathland and masses of Brown Tailed Moth nests in the Gorse:
 
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Phew! It was hot and I was soon retreating back into the shade of the trees.... BIG mistake.  I carried on, assuming I was on the right path... right up until I got back to the sign for Incleborough Hill  >:(   From here, I sort of wandered around aimlessly, retracing my steps until I ended up at the golf course which I'd not passed previously and I didn't want to be here either  ;D   but at least I knew where I was now  ::) 
 
A quick re-jig of my plans had me heading over Town Hill towards Sandy Lane (track).  I spotted a caravan site and succumbed to my first ice lolly of the day, plus another bottle of water to replace the one I'd already got through.  I was only about 3 miles into the walk and sweating (sorry, glowing) profusely.  These hills may not be big but there's some flipping steep bits and that, combined with about 30 degree heat DEFINITELY justifies an ice lolly a mere 3 miles into a walk in my book  O0
 
I sat a while in the shade and ate my ice lolly, then had a mini sausage roll (packup) and more water to top up the salt/sugar/fat/carb/fluid intake as I could already feel a heat headache coming on.  I bought another bottle of water just to be safe.  Seriously, my clothes were wringing wet through from sweat and I tasted salty(!!)

I carried on up the looooooong, sloooooooow, energy sapping Sandy Lane track to the highest point in Norfolk - Beacon Hill - a stonking 338ft above sea level:
 
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More leafy lanes, although I'm not sure the shade was a help or hindrance seeing as there wasn't a breath of wind and the hot, sticky air just hung, trapped in the trees.  A lovely trail though with lots of chances to wiggle off route to get views like these:
 
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... looking over West Runton to the sea.  Every time I found a bench I had to have a sit and a cool down to admire the views  :)
 
Along the way I spotted this subtle clue, letting me know I was on the right track... only I wasn't (again  ::)  ):
 
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I sort of followed it down hill into a pine forest then just pointed my compass at the sea and picked a way down towards the track I could see people walking along farrrrr below.  It worked and I popped out somewhere on Calves Well Lane opposite a field of horses (the Horse Sanctuary).
 
From there, I headed to Beeston Regis.  I love the cobble "cladding" of the buildings:
 
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I was out in the open now and BOY it was like walking in a blast furnace.  I could feel the sunburn on my arms but couldn't stand the long sleeves of my thin and flimsy windshirt clinging to me so it was on/off/on/off/draped over my shoulders/stuffed in my pocket/tied round my waist.
 
Walking across the small heathland just before the climb to Beeston Bump (fab name  :D  ) was stiflingly hot and I began to wonder whether going up the bump was a good idea in this sun and heat - I think it was just after midday as well.  I found a bench in the heathland and sat and had another mini sausage roll and some now sun-boiled water which tasted strangely alkaline and slippery.  From past personal experience I know this strange watery taste sensation is a danger sign of dehydration and heatstroke.  Even though I actually felt okay in myself (apart from hot and sticky) I decided to nibble some fruit pastilles and eat another sausage roll before going up Beeston Bump.  Finding shade and cooling down wasn't an option so I sat with my windshirt over my head and draped over my shoulders  ;D   A right bonny bugga I looked, I'm sure.
 
So, here it is, the climb up Beeston Bump:
 
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About 30 sandy steps and a steep bit gets you to the top.  It might as well have been Everest for how hard that was in the heat!
 
But, OhhhhhHHHH, the views - Looking along my return journey on the beach to my campsite, with Cromer beyond:
 
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... and looking the other way to my cream scone and cup of tea, err, sorry, looking towards Sheringham:
 
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There are lots of benches for summit slugs on the top so I took advantage and enjoyed a fluffy coffee and biscuit and absent-mindedly realised that I hadn't needed a, ahem, comfort break since 7am and still didn't need one now despite drinking 2 litres of water.  There was a slight breeze up here too, which was nice  :)
 
I headed down into Sheringham, passing lots of brightly coloured and interestingly named beach huts which looked fab - I didn't like to take pictures of them though as they were mostly occupied and there were lots of little-uns running around - it didn't seem right to take pics somehow. 
 
I found a little sea-side café and got a pot of tea and a cream scone.  Grabbed a table outside and dragged it into the shade (sitting inside was unbearably stuffy and I really felt for the poor staff working in there), changed into my flipflops and had a leisurely sit and people-watch as I munched on my scone and supped my tea.  Despite not feeling remotely hungry or thirsty, I was surprised how much better I felt for doing that to be honest. 
 
After a good rest, I set off along the prom to walk along the beach. Along a quieter part of the prom there were some unused beach huts so I took a quick snap of them:
 
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And down onto the beach I go (arty-farty pic alert!):
 
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A couple of miles or so of beach walking, paddling in the sea and poking around rock pools and strange flint/chalk ring formation things and looking at the stripes in the sandstone cliffs turned this walk into a lovely, varied and interesting walk:
 
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All that remained was a swim in the sea.  As I neared the slipway to the beach at West Runton (mentally noted the little café selling ice creams at the top  ;)  ) I took my rucksack off and just walked into the sea.... fully clothed  :o   :D   ;D   If I need to justify this then here's my reason.... I was hot, sweaty, my clothes were stuck to me from sweat anyway and there were too many people around to strip off so, I just walked in fully clothed... makes sense in my world  O0
 
God it felt good.  I splished around for mebby 15 minutes before drip-drying on the beach sat on the edge of the slipway a while.  .... Then saw they were taking the signs in at the little café..... NOOOOOOOOOOO.  I fair sprinted up that slipway and schlopped my way to the ice cream counter... phew! They were still serving.  My second ice cream of the day tasted won-der-ful and fortified me for the last half a mile along the cliff top.
 
Back at the tent I got changed into my cozzie, had a cuppa, then wandered back down to the beach for a proper swim before my tea (the other half of the quiche, etc).  I forgot just how much I enjoy swimming in the sea  :)
 
A nice shower and food and finally, I get to tick something off my "things to do before I die" list....
 
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... sit on top of a hill watching the sun set ... cheers  O0
 
The whole walk ended up being 9.5 miles after adding on my twiddly bits and paths going round in circles and all that  :-X 
 
Thanks for reading.
 
Mel  :)
 
No expense spared in pursuit of a bargain ;)

Ridge

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Re: County Bagging: Norfolk (East Runton to Sheringham)
« Reply #1 on: 01:19:12, 09/07/17 »
Great report Mel and good to see you back on the Forum.
Over hill, over dale. Thorough brush, thorough brier....
I do wander every where

DevonDave

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Re: County Bagging: Norfolk (East Runton to Sheringham)
« Reply #2 on: 09:12:17, 09/07/17 »
A fantastic report Mel, I always enjoy reading them.  Norfolk is a county I have never visited, despite the fact that my family originated from there in the distant past.  I must get round to it one day.

cpjmathieson

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Re: County Bagging: Norfolk (East Runton to Sheringham)
« Reply #3 on: 16:22:26, 09/07/17 »
Great trip report thanks!  O0

Dovegirl

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Re: County Bagging: Norfolk (East Runton to Sheringham)
« Reply #4 on: 20:16:37, 09/07/17 »
Enjoyed that very much Mel    :)   Looks lovely on top of the cliffs

pleb

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Re: County Bagging: Norfolk (East Runton to Sheringham)
« Reply #5 on: 10:22:38, 10/07/17 »
Great pics O0 but it wasn't that hot this weekend surely? :-\

adalard

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Re: County Bagging: Norfolk (East Runton to Sheringham)
« Reply #6 on: 10:51:32, 10/07/17 »
Cracking trip report, Mel - I could almost feel the heat as I read it!


I went to Sheringham many years ago for a few days. It was a lovely little town from what I remember, with a great shop that sold fossils. I didn't do any walking though, which is a shame as it looks lovely.


The sign for Beeston Bump with the reference to the phantom hound, Black Shuck, made me chuckle. We visited Trollers Gill a couple of years ago and the locals there also claim their ghostly pooch (the Barguest) inspired Conan Doyle. I wonder how many other places make the same claim? And why not? It all adds to the interest of the walk!  ;D


And welcome back from me too, btw.  :)

alewife

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Re: County Bagging: Norfolk (East Runton to Sheringham)
« Reply #7 on: 17:32:44, 10/07/17 »
Yes, nice to have you back on here, looks like you had a great trip and plenty (too much?) Of hot sunny weather.. well done on bagging another county. O0
Alewife


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rural roamer

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Re: County Bagging: Norfolk (East Runton to Sheringham)
« Reply #8 on: 19:15:49, 10/07/17 »
Great pics and report.  We often go to Norfolk ( as we live in Suffolk) and walk around Felbrigg and Sheringham but theres some of your walk we haven't done, so will look at that next time. If you venture further south to Suffolk and want some tips just ask[size=78%] [/size] :)

Jac

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Re: County Bagging: Norfolk (East Runton to Sheringham)
« Reply #9 on: 20:05:14, 10/07/17 »
Great TR - put a smile on a dull day :)
I too walked straight into the sea when we finished a walk at Broad Haven on the hottest day - felt soooo good.
Love the arty-farty pic and those rings of flint and chalk? are very odd. Do you know anything more about them?
and welcome back :)
Most walks start by finding the way out of the car park

sunnydale

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Re: County Bagging: Norfolk (East Runton to Sheringham)
« Reply #10 on: 20:48:29, 10/07/17 »
Lovely pics and report Mel O0
***Happiness is only a smile away***

Mel

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Re: County Bagging: Norfolk (East Runton to Sheringham)
« Reply #11 on: 21:13:37, 10/07/17 »
Cheers for the comments everyone  :)
 
Ridge - Cheers.  My computer's been in for repairs and logging on or posting with my phone is a pain in the wotsits so I just browsed during my absence  :(
 
DevonDave - Ta muchly.  Aye, get exploring. Even though I live near the coast myself, the difference between the two relatively close areas was astounding  O0
 
cpjmathieson - Thank you  :)
 
Dovegirl - Thanks.  I love views of coastal cliffs, from the top looking down, from the bottom looking up, from the sea looking in  :)
 
Pleb - Cheers.  It was a weekend mid-June ... I think those 4 days were called "summer"  :-\
 
adalard - Thank you.  Yes, there seems to be lots of stories of beasts roaming around our countryside.  I'm convinced they were invented to stop the superstitious people of yester-year wandering where they shouldn't  ???
 
alewife - Cheers.  It certainly was the best weekend ever to camp on a cliff top  :)
 
ruralroamer - Ta very much.  It's only a matter of time before Suffolk gets pulled out of my jar... be warned  :o
 
Jac - Thank you.  You can't beat a dip in the sea at the end of a good walk on a hot day.  I have read that those rings were created by lava covering sea creatures which fossilised then the creature (being softer than the flint) dissolved, leaving a hole behind.  My geology isn't good enough to know if this is fact or fiction though.... of course, it could be the fossilised poo of the Beast of Beeston Bump  :D
 
sunnydale - Thank you  :)
 
 
No expense spared in pursuit of a bargain ;)

April

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Re: County Bagging: Norfolk (East Runton to Sheringham)
« Reply #12 on: 08:50:21, 11/07/17 »
Great report Mel  O0 Tut, tut @ you being a summit slug  :o  :) I'm off for a cool shower now, I feel really hot for some reason  :)
"Who would've thought...... you are light and darkness coming through" words by Tim Armstrong

alewife

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Re: County Bagging: Norfolk (East Runton to Sheringham)
« Reply #13 on: 09:11:23, 11/07/17 »
The flinty rings are called paramoudras, and are a fossilised burrow of an unknown creature. ( I looked it up; even though I studied a bit of geology, I don't remember doing these :-\ )


http://www.northfolk.org.uk/geology/erratics.html
Alewife


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Jac

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Re: County Bagging: Norfolk (East Runton to Sheringham)
« Reply #14 on: 10:45:46, 11/07/17 »
The flinty rings are called paramoudras, and are a fossilised burrow of an unknown creature. ( I looked it up; even though I studied a bit of geology, I don't remember doing these :-\ )

http://www.northfolk.org.uk/geology/erratics.html

What a super link, thank you. Geology is just so incredibly complicated and fascinating.It's spotting things like this together with all the varied aspects of landscape, nature, agriculture etc and investigating them that makes walking so rewarding.
 
Most walks start by finding the way out of the car park