Author Topic: Fleetwith pike  (Read 259 times)

dinger

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Fleetwith pike
« on: 21:05:20, 19/07/17 »

Can anyone tell me why theres a cross half way down Fleetwith pike?

ninthace

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Re: Fleetwith pike
« Reply #1 on: 21:12:49, 19/07/17 »
It commemorates the death of an unfortunate young lady called Fanny Mercer. Google is your friend.


See also reply #6 on http://www.walkingforum.co.uk/index.php?topic=5454.0
Solvitur Ambulando

Glyno

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Re: Fleetwith pike
« Reply #2 on: 21:12:55, 19/07/17 »

Glyno

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Re: Fleetwith pike
« Reply #3 on: 21:13:25, 19/07/17 »
Google is your friend.


so am I  :)

April

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Re: Fleetwith pike
« Reply #4 on: 21:14:44, 19/07/17 »
Fanny Mercer, age 18, and other servants of Rev P Bowden Smith, given a day off, climbed Honister Crag and came down Fleetwith, 8 September 1887. Her alpenstock jammed in a crack in a rock and pushed her off the rock face. The inscription reads:-
Erected by Friends of Fanny Mercer. Accidentally killed 1887.
 
From the Old Cumbria Gazetteer
 
"Who would've thought...... you are light and darkness coming through" words by Tim Armstrong

Lakeland Lorry

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Re: Fleetwith pike
« Reply #5 on: 09:40:21, 20/07/17 »
This is what the original inquest into Fanny Mercer's death recorded:

On the day of the accident Fanny, and two other servants  were given the day off and set out for a walk over the fells. Eventually they arrived on Honister Crag and decided to return to Buttermere via Fleetwith Pike and Fleetwith Edge. It was on their descent, as they neared the road, that the accident happened. Fanny, who was at the rear,  apparently jumped off the ledge on which she was standing, using her alpenstock for support. The effect was to propel her upwards and outwards, so she fell a considerable distance and unfortunately struck her head on a rock.

Fanny suffered severe head wounds and was carried down to Gatesgarth Farm, alas to no avail. A messenger was sent for a doctor from Cockermouth but, by the time he arrived, several hours later, Fanny had died.

The cross was repainted a few years ago by Derek Tunstall, of the Cockermouth Mountain Rescue Team.