Author Topic: Walker rescued from 'precarious position'  (Read 755 times)

willow229

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Re: Walker rescued from 'precarious position'
« Reply #15 on: 16:47:32, 17/08/17 »
Good grief, not a spot you want to find yourself at in bad weather. I wonder if he tried to get down via the gully not realising it was so steep?


thomasdevon

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Re: Walker rescued from 'precarious position'
« Reply #16 on: 11:05:38, 19/08/17 »
Good grief, not a spot you want to find yourself at in bad weather. I wonder if he tried to get down via the gully not realising it was so steep?


Well this is a puzzle, and the thought process involved might seem like nit-picking to the rescue team but could be very illuminating for us hikers. Almost no accident in any field depends on one single mishap, there is usually a chain or pyramid of contributing factors. Add to this the strange ways the human mind reacts under stress, and there can be much to learn from incidents on the hill.

BuzyG

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Re: Walker rescued from 'precarious position'
« Reply #17 on: 16:06:09, 25/08/17 »
Its the reason why all fell walkers should aquire some basic climbing skills.These days basic training courses are run by various organisations so its not difficult for people to get training.In the old days, sixties/seventies,a lot of us started with rock climbing and took up walking later so all the survival skills were already in place.I would suggest the problem in this incident was the guy's head rather than the terrain as he lost it and panic set in.If he had thought things through in a clear manner he could have gone back up maintaining three point contact during every move and got back on the ridge safely.

 Its not warning notices that are required but rather an increase in skill levels to combat any hazards the walker/climber might face.


Have to agree with much of this.  If you can get down, you can nearly always get back up more easily/safely. 


Personalty I make a point of heading to the Cheese ring quarry every couple of years and free climbing some old routes, simply as training, for when I'm out walking.  It's an enlightening experience as I get older and there are several routes I no longer feel comfortable climbing.  The point is, it resets my limits so there's a reference point there for when I come across a tricky spot when out walking.