Author Topic: Protecting your money on the trail.  (Read 552 times)

gunwharfman

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Protecting your money on the trail.
« on: 14:26:10, 26/08/17 »
It has never happened to me when hiking, but its always a possibility I suppose, one day I could be mugged and robbed? I'm that sure the probability is very low, I've always worked in the principle that most opportunists would not venture far from town and city streets! However, when I was off road running yesterday two young men walked towards me and attempted to block me going further! I reacted quickly, my previous years of working with 'dodgy' people I think helped because in a split second I knew what they were attempting to do. I just ran straight though them, used my left arm to 'knife' my way between their touching shoulders and managed to push one over with my right arm! I didn't stop and like so many people today, they did not have the stamina or the fitness to catchy this old fella!

I'll avoid the area for a few weeks just in case they hope I will run that route again.

Anyway it started me thinking. It might be, that when hiking, some of us might be carrying a fair bit of cash? We also might be carrying a card and a smartphone and some people might be using their phone for online banking. For me my PIN number is in my head. If a hiker wanted to feel safer, I asked myself how could it be done?

One question I am interested in is, can a banking app be HIDDEN inside an Iphone or an Android phone so that anyone stealing it would not know its there?

I went off road running this morning, bank holiday Saturday and didn't see a soul in 5 miles!

walkingthedog

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Re: Protecting your money on the trail.
« Reply #1 on: 14:45:57, 26/08/17 »
I'm so pleased you were able to read what was going on, well I was mugged while out hiking a few years back when this car approached me along a country road and four lads got out they asked me directions then punched me to floor knocking me unconscious and when I came round I had my phone and wallet taken along with my back pack. Nothing was taken from my account but I had my loose notes and change taken. Now I don't take much cash just enough incase of emergencies. And I only carry a cheap phone as well.
These people have still not been caught. >:(

Owen

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Re: Protecting your money on the trail.
« Reply #2 on: 15:01:49, 26/08/17 »
I normally only have one key on me when I'm out jogging, I assume most people are the same. So your pair can't be the brightest tools in the box.
Never had anything like it in this country but did have a few close calls in South America that was in Lima city and Belize city. I've had stuff taken from outside a tent as well.
It's always difficult to know what to do in such situation, run away if you can, fight back? Often a very risky option or just give them what they want, they could still turn on you so no right answers. I still think your far safer out walking in the hills than in any town.  [size=78%]  [/size]

walkingthedog

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Re: Protecting your money on the trail.
« Reply #3 on: 15:09:39, 26/08/17 »
Hi Owen the country road was going towards tanhill pub which is quite remote, so I thought I was quite safe so you never know what can happen. :)

NeilC

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Re: Protecting your money on the trail.
« Reply #4 on: 15:54:06, 08/09/17 »
It's so unlikely it's not worth worrying about in the UK. Sure it can happen but then so can a lot of other things.


I guess if you're more adventurous and hiking in more dangerous places like parts of S.America etc then precautions should be taken but not sure what they would be. If a mugger wants your PIN number they're gonna get it. Some of them carry those PINsentry things with them to check you've given them the right number so you can't even lie about it. But there are a lot of places you can hide a card or cash in a pack full of kit or even hiking trousers with loads of pockets, and of course there are money belts.


If you want to feel a bit more secure, you can legally carry a non-locking, folding blade with a cutting edge up to 3" long quite legally and with no obligation to provide any reason why. You can carry longer blades, fixed or locking if you have a reason and camping provides a reason (IMO you should have a blade in tent if you're intending to cook in the porch or whatever as a way of cutting your way out rapidly in a fire.). I carry a knife when backpacking but not for self defence reasons. I doubt I'd pull it unless actually in fear of my life. From the police perspective - you should never be carrying anything for self defence, but you can use anything for defence if you need to.


As for apps - set you can hide apps using applocker type apps which can be set to both hide and lock access to apps. And you should password protect your phone anyway.




happyhiker

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Re: Protecting your money on the trail.
« Reply #5 on: 00:35:25, 09/09/17 »
I'm so pleased you were able to read what was going on, well I was mugged while out hiking a few years back when this car approached me along a country road and four lads got out they asked me directions then punched me to floor knocking me unconscious and when I came round I had my phone and wallet taken along with my back pack. Nothing was taken from my account but I had my loose notes and change taken. Now I don't take much cash just enough incase of emergencies. And I only carry a cheap phone as well.
These people have still not been caught. >:(


Just as a matter of interest so we can all be aware, where was this?

gunwharfman

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Re: Protecting your money on the trail.
« Reply #6 on: 10:59:52, 09/09/17 »
The location I think, does not matter that much, after all 'a few years' have now passed. To me, the important thing is that it could happen, or it might never happen! The scenario is possible however, especially for people like me who live in a city, maybe less likely up on the hills? I can only do what I've always done, for example when walking towards people, perhaps late at night after a few drinks and your antennae tells you to be careful, what do you do, brazen it out, cross the road, etc? I can only do what I do!

During my hiking career I have met some odd people, some would say very odd indeed. I was once attacked in my bed in the Keswick YHA and even asked by a copper if I had a bomb in my rucksack, things happen!