Author Topic: Tent Comparisons  (Read 5625 times)

alan de enfield

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Tent Comparisons
« on: 19:35:50, 22/02/18 »

A (very) long time walker and forum lurker. Getting back into walking during the last couple of years following medical advice.
Walked many long distance walks in the 70's/80's but 'life' eventually got in the way.


I purchased a 'Nature Hike' (Chinese) tent a couple of years ago. I have not had any problems with it, and its never leaked a drop, but was thinking of updating my equipment and going a little more 'lightweight'.


This 2-Man tent weighs in, (complete), at 1240 grams (1322g packed) and I've been struggling to find a reasonably priced alternative that offers any weight savings.
The best I have found is the MSR Reflex 2.


I am sure there are some quality differences between the 'brand' tent and the 'Chinese' tent but looking at the specifications they look comparable & if anything the Nature Hike appears to have better HH (water) resistance, and is 'heavier grade' material and less likely to be damaged.


So, after all that pre-amble, and considering that the existing tent is still watertight is it worth spending another 350 to save 250 grams.


Specification Comparisons


                                                 MSR Reflex 2                     NH 15T002-T-20D Silicone
Floor Area                           2.7m2                                                  2.9m2
Interior height                   860mm                                           1000mm
Flysheet Material             7 Denier 1200mm                              20 Denier 8000mm
                                                Durashield Silicon                       Duraflex Silicon
Floor                                      15 Denier Nylon                           150 Denier
                                                1200mm PU                                 8000mm
Tent                                       Mesh 10 Denier                            150 Denier + Mesh
Poles                                     Carbon Fibre                                  Aircraft Aluminium Alloy
Packed Size                         43cm x 13cm                                  40cm x 13cm
Packed Weight                  990 gram                                          1240 gram
Current Price                       349 - 420                                    62.99


Any comments or observations welcomed (I'd be quite happy if the consensus was to stick with what I have)
 

Welsh Rambler

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Re: Tent Comparisons
« Reply #1 on: 21:08:01, 22/02/18 »
Hi Alan and welcome to the forum.


Only you can truly answer your question. If,  after a long day's hike, you are so tired that you feel you must carry less weight then the answer could be 'yes' but if could be the 250g could be saved on other kit for a lot less money.


It sounds like you are satisfied with your existing tent but would like some support to justify spending a lot more money on something you may like less.  :-\


 I am a tight old git that would start considering whether I could lose 250g of my bodyweight (which I ought to consider anyway ::) ) rather than change what appears to be a very capable tent.


Good luck with getting back to walking.


Regards Keith

alan de enfield

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Re: Tent Comparisons
« Reply #2 on: 21:22:18, 22/02/18 »





 I am a tight old git that would start considering whether I could lose 250g of my bodyweight (which I ought to consider anyway ::) ) rather than change what appears to be a very capable tent.


Good luck with getting back to walking.


Regards Keith


Thanks for the welcome.


I was diagnosed diabetic, overweight and with a dangerously high Cholesterol 3 years ago, I started walking again, covering 4-10 miles 5 or 6 times a week and for every pound I lost I 'added a pound weight' to my Rucksack - when, after 11 months I had 56 lbs in the sack I decided that, as an 'oldie'  it was enough and started to walk 'seriously' again carrying a reasonable weight.


I am no longer classed as diabetic, have a Cholesterol of 3.5 and feel much better.


Spent the odd nights out, but now looking to do some multi-day trips.


I am not at all unhappy with my current gear but just sort of feel its time for a bit of retail therapy.

fernman

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Re: Tent Comparisons
« Reply #3 on: 22:12:47, 22/02/18 »
I'm with WR on this one:

could be the 250g could be saved on other kit for a lot less money.

Save your money. Go through the rest of your gear item by item and see what you can replace with something lighter. It shouldn't take much to save 250g and it'll cost you a lot less.

This is coming from someone with something in common with both of you above:
1: I'm a tight old git too, with me it goes hand-in-hand with a low income.
2. I have high cholesterol too, but unlike Alan of EN1 mine refuses to budge in spite of eating all the right things, etc (the Yorkie bars in my backpacking food list are the only times I ever eat them, honest!).

jimbob

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Re: Tent Comparisons
« Reply #4 on: 00:27:00, 23/02/18 »
Without knowing what knapsack you have it is very possible you could save that weight easily for a lot less money. Me I am a believer in tight fistidness. AND for that money you could get a really good down sleeping bag  which would be even more beneficial to your knees hips and back.
Too little, too late, too bad......

alan de enfield

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Re: Tent Comparisons
« Reply #5 on: 07:57:45, 23/02/18 »

Without knowing what knapsack you have it is very possible you could save that weight easily for a lot less money. Me I am a believer in tight fistidness. AND for that money you could get a really good down sleeping bag  which would be even more beneficial to your knees hips and back.


Good point.
I have a Berghaus Trailhead 65 that weighs in at 1.7 kgs empty which for its size and strength seems to be comparable with, and lighter than, many.
Tent 'footprint' is 0.23kg.
My sleeping bag is a candidate for weight reduction being a Vango Wilderness (rated 5 / 0 / -15) and weighs 1.5kg inc stuff sack.
Self Inflating Sleeping mat weighs in at 0.99kg.


Total weight of 'cooking equipment' comes in at 1.4Kgs
(P51 Can Opener, Aluminium Foil, Lighter, Washing up Liquid, Pan Scourer, Piezo-Ignition Stove, Stove Stand / Remote Gas Adapter, Plastic Spatula, Tea-Spoon,
Titanium Saucepan & Frying Pan,  Gas Stove, 220g Colman Gas Cartridge (Will Boil ~ 13 Litres Water), Folding Wood Stove (With Paper & Kindling), 1x 'long' Lighter, Stainless Steel Bowls (2x 50g), 250ml Stainless Steel Cup, 2x Aluminium Foil 'Pans', Aluminium  Stove Wind-Break, Tea-Towel).
[/font]

jimbob

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Re: Tent Comparisons
« Reply #6 on: 09:01:28, 23/02/18 »
Well a down sleping bag will save you at least half a kilo., probably more.

Take a really good look at all that cooking gear. Maybe a small jet boil,  titanium spork and a few wet wipes would do the same job? A spare lighter perhaps.

Personally I carry high energy bars  and eat in pubs/ cafes. Better meals than I can cook and free use of a usually decent loo. GUNWHARFMAN is to thank for this. I copied his modus , it certainly works for me.

I want the lightest load I can afford so that I can walk easily. I am prepared to put up with discomfort, well , except for cold and hunger.

Too little, too late, too bad......

alan de enfield

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Re: Tent Comparisons
« Reply #7 on: 09:40:46, 23/02/18 »

Well a down sleping bag will save you at least half a kilo., probably more.

Take a really good look at all that cooking gear. Maybe a small jet boil,  titanium spork and a few wet wipes would do the same job? A spare lighter perhaps.

Personally I carry high energy bars  and eat in pubs/ cafes. Better meals than I can cook and free use of a usually decent loo. GUNWHARFMAN is to thank for this. I copied his modus , it certainly works for me.

I want the lightest load I can afford so that I can walk easily. I am prepared to put up with discomfort, well , except for cold and hunger.


Thanks for the suggestions, the key parts of my cook system are Gas Stove with piezo ignition (114g), Gas cartridge (367g) and Titanium Saucepan & frying pan (165g) and Stove 'wind break' is 13 grams.
 I guess I could ditch some of the 'bits and bobs' and save a bit.


Wet wipes are not light - a 24 'pocket pack' weighs in at 100g whilst a 64 pack weighs 512g so I think my 1/2 a tea towel (89g) and 30ml (40g) bottle of washing up liquid can remain.


I have been thru' a series of stove types including Hexamine, Alcohol/Meths, & Gel ending up with gas as the most efficient and Kw for Kw the lightest weight - I'll start another thread on my Stove selection criteria.


I do need to eat 'properly' and could easily slip back into being diabetic (you are never totally cured) so cannot rely on high sugar / carb snacks, so being able to reliably heat up water for my dehydrated Curry & Rice, Shepherds pie, etc etc is essential.

gunwharfman

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Re: Tent Comparisons
« Reply #8 on: 10:10:42, 23/02/18 »
Lots of good advice there. I too was considering a new tent purchase and looked at Naturehike, I facied the copy of the Tarptent Rainbow 1, the Targa. I nearly bought it but then decided to go off on another way of camping, bivi and tarp.

I have a 'lightweight' Osprey 48L (I know there are a number of lighter rucksacks out there), a down sleeping quilt, a Thermarest Neo Air and can use either a Zephyros 1 (for winter) and a Marmot Pulsa 1 (for summer) so added together the weight is more than OK for me. Of course with other stuff and clothing and water the weight rises but I'm happy with my lot. I don't cook en route (I go to pubs, etc) so thats another weight saving for me.

The way I look at it, like so many others, why spend out loads of money on one very lightweight item when you can spread the lighter weight via a number of items. I would have considered a more expensive tent but I made the decision that I don't do enough camping to warrent such an outlay, I'd rather spend it on beer and good living!

alan de enfield

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Re: Tent Comparisons
« Reply #9 on: 10:54:59, 23/02/18 »
Thanks GWM - more food for thought.

Stube

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Re: Tent Comparisons
« Reply #10 on: 11:33:35, 23/02/18 »
There are much easier (and cheaper) ways to save weight than buying a new tent! If you like your tent then stick with it. I would avoid carbon fibre tentpoles - they are fragile - I broken them - never any problems with alloy. You can often save significant weight by simply changing the guylines and pegs.

You should be able to get a suitable 55/60 litre backpack for around 1kg - I've sourced two from charity shops! (about 7each O0 )

Your sleeping mat is heavy. Modern ultralite self-inflating mats will be half that weight full size - less if 3/4 (120cm) long.  Decathlon had a good example in their sale for 14.

Mountain Hardwear Hyperlamina or Nordisk Oscar are synthetic sleeping bags with similar performance/weight characteristics to down at half the price.

Food for thought






NeilC

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Re: Tent Comparisons
« Reply #11 on: 13:46:54, 23/02/18 »
I agree - a sleeping kit weighing 2.7KG is a much better candidate than an already light tent. Although of course, if you've got the spare cash then why not do all them?


Other easy saves are using a water filter or tablets instead of carrying all the water (if the landscape allows), choice of foods (use dried if water is easily available), unneeded clothing one takes "just in case".


The key question is: what is your current pack weight?


In my personal opinion, there is a limit to weigh saving benefits. I.e. sure you can spend s and save grams but do your legs really notice 500g in pack weighing say 10KG incl food and water? Mine don't.
« Last Edit: 13:53:38, 23/02/18 by NeilC »

Welsh Rambler

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Re: Tent Comparisons
« Reply #12 on: 14:43:50, 23/02/18 »

Thanks for the welcome.


I was diagnosed diabetic, overweight and with a dangerously high Cholesterol 3 years ago, I started walking again, covering 4-10 miles 5 or 6 times a week and for every pound I lost I 'added a pound weight' to my Rucksack - when, after 11 months I had 56 lbs in the sack I decided that, as an 'oldie'  it was enough and started to walk 'seriously' again carrying a reasonable weight.


I am no longer classed as diabetic, have a Cholesterol of 3.5 and feel much better.


Spent the odd nights out, but now looking to do some multi-day trips.


I am not at all unhappy with my current gear but just sort of feel its time for a bit of retail therapy.


Haha, the truth is out  :D  Given what you've achieved and the significant effort needed I can understand your need for a bit of retail therapy  O0


Good luck with whatever you decide to buy but do let us know if the you like the new gear,  it's the sharing of knowledge and experience that makes this forum so successful.


Regards Keith

Gadabout Bounder

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Re: Tent Comparisons
« Reply #13 on: 00:36:04, 24/02/18 »
Retail therapy would be changing the rucksack and sleep system. [/size]


That's a lot of rucksack - 56 pounds is about 25 kilos - what are you carrying that weighs that much or was that till you got fit and now you've cut that weight?
'We've spilt the same blood in the same mud'

Gadabout Bounder

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Re: Tent Comparisons
« Reply #14 on: 00:39:29, 24/02/18 »
Oh and well done on the personal weight loss O0
« Last Edit: 01:24:01, 24/02/18 by Gadabout Bounder »
'We've spilt the same blood in the same mud'