Author Topic: A Rucsack fitting problem.  (Read 2481 times)

marmottungsten

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Re: A Rucsack fitting problem.
« Reply #15 on: 05:19:47, 10/05/18 »
I would not put so much reliance on the hip belt taking the weight of your backpack or on buying a larger backpack than you actually need...I'm 6 foot 1 inch tall which means my M.H. Scrambler RT35 is several inches shorter than my torso length and this means the hip belt does not actually reach down to my hips...It is really there to just to hold it securely to my back, so the pack doesn't wobble around as I walk...If it does that you are not just wasting energy but it can chaff your shoulders and/or your back leaving you feeling uncomfortable.  My RT35 is big enough for all my kit, and even at a weight of just over 10kg it is extremely comfortable to hike with...even when I am only wearing a thin, ultralight, Polyester walking T-Shirt.  I use the latter because it's much lighter than a Cotton T-shirt, quickly wicks away any sweat, and because it's also quick drying.  By the way, I always use the chest strap, both to hold the shoulder straps in the most comfortable position, but to also take some of the weight off my shoulders and distribute some of it across my chest, so use every strap provided and adjust them properly.  I found that when I adjusted the shoulder straps for maximum length, because of my tall torso length, the backpack was wobbling around a lot as I walked, which was very uncomfortable, even for a few hundred yards...Instead, I pulled the top adjuster straps tight to shorten the shoulder straps to their minimum length and the pack stopped wobbling altogether and it sort of became part of my body, rather than something foreign hanging off it, if that makes sense...So proper adjustment is far more important than the size of the pack.
« Last Edit: 05:23:33, 10/05/18 by marmottungsten »

fernman

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Re: A Rucsack fitting problem.
« Reply #16 on: 09:08:55, 10/05/18 »
I would not put so much reliance on the hip belt taking the weight of your backpack or on buying a larger backpack than you actually need...I'm 6 foot 1 inch tall which means my M.H. Scrambler RT35 is several inches shorter than my torso length and this means the hip belt does not actually reach down to my hips...It is really there to just to hold it securely to my back, so the pack doesn't wobble around as I walk.

Given that the whole concept of a backpack is for the greater part of the load to be carried on the pelvis, all that tells me is that you bought a pack that is too small for your back size. Your choice, but not to be recommended.

sussamb

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Re: A Rucsack fitting problem.
« Reply #17 on: 09:14:22, 10/05/18 »
Yes agreed. You may cope but it's not to be recommended.


By the way, I always use the chest strap, both to hold the shoulder straps in the most comfortable position, but to also take some of the weight off my shoulders and distribute some of it across my chest.


I'm also not sure how you think the chest straps take some of the weight  :(
« Last Edit: 09:22:13, 10/05/18 by sussamb »
Where there's a will ...

beefy

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Re: A Rucsack fitting problem.
« Reply #18 on: 11:03:50, 10/05/18 »
Quote
I'm at a loss how to fit it better to avoid having to refit every 20 minutes.
Hi steve
I have a similar problem, I do carry rather a lot of weight compared to some, and although my pack is very comfortable on my back, it does tend to wiggle its way down after a short time, transferring the weight onto my shoulders, and also pressing my chest slightly, restricting my breathing on steep ascents,
I just keep readjusting the hip belt and accept its going to happen,
It doesn’t happen as much when my pack is lighter, say when it’s half full,
I use what I call “Dolly’s” (short for Dolly Partons )  ;D  to carry my cameras which weigh 3.4kg, these are a front pack called Ribz,
If you look at my videos or Aprils trip reports you will see them in action  :)
These make my backpack weigh less and help with the problem, but don’t stop it happening altogether,
If you find a way of stopping this from happening please let me know
Good luck with it
ATB beefy 8)
PS
including my dolly’s I was carrying 19.2kg last weekend
« Last Edit: 11:22:13, 10/05/18 by beefy »

April

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Re: A Rucsack fitting problem.
« Reply #19 on: 11:32:49, 10/05/18 »
including my dolly’s I was carrying 19.2kg last weekend

Now if you didn't carry any wine or cameras it would have been about 11kg  ;D
"Who would've thought...... you are light and darkness coming through" words by Tim Armstrong

beefy

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Re: A Rucsack fitting problem.
« Reply #20 on: 14:24:47, 10/05/18 »
Now if you didn't carry any wine or cameras it would have been about 11kg  ;D
Yeah...
It' a good job I don't drink, otherwise I'd have to carry wine for me too,
And yours weighs enough  :D


April

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Re: A Rucsack fitting problem.
« Reply #21 on: 14:36:38, 10/05/18 »
It' a good job I don't drink, otherwise I'd have to carry wine for me too,

 ;D What is that burning smell? Oh, your pants are on fire  :D
"Who would've thought...... you are light and darkness coming through" words by Tim Armstrong

Slogger

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Re: A Rucsack fitting problem.
« Reply #22 on: 16:20:34, 10/05/18 »
Right size sack, proper fitting, weight etc, all valid points but the fact also is that with some sacks even expensive ones, the webbing used on straps gives in to slippage through the grips on ajustable buckles. I have noticed this particularly on warm dry days. I have even added some velcro to straps to prevent this.

beefy

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Re: A Rucsack fitting problem.
« Reply #23 on: 17:27:01, 10/05/18 »
;D What is that burning smell? Oh, your pants are on fire  :D
Yeah I've been using the Alpkit Koro flamethrower, it set them on fire  ;D


Right size sack, proper fitting, weight etc, all valid points but the fact also is that with some sacks even expensive ones, the webbing used on straps gives in to slippage through the grips on ajustable buckles. I have noticed this particularly on warm dry days. I have even added some velcro to straps to prevent this.


Good point  O0

FOX160

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Re: A Rucsack fitting problem.
« Reply #24 on: 20:21:51, 10/05/18 »
Is your pack the correct size. Have you packed it correctly, also have you sinched in the compression straps when packed.
If all above is correct then loosen all your straps and put on your pack.
First the general rule of thumb is to have the top of your padded hip belt approx 1inch above you hip bones
and sinch in, then adjust your chest straps, these must follow over your shoulders without any gaps.
Also check to make sure if your frame of the pack is fixed correctly or where it should be.

Steve922

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Re: A Rucsack fitting problem.
« Reply #25 on: 19:06:35, 30/05/18 »
I may have solved my Rucksack problem. By fitting the sides of the hip belt quite high (only just touching the top of my hip bone) and fastening the belt three inches higher than my belly-button, sufficient weight is transferred to the front so the back won't slip down much, by which time its quite firm on my hips.  Seems to work ok. I've tried it a few times with up to 9 - 11 Kg in my old oversize (85 Litre) rucksack and today with my new (65 litre) Rucksack on test carrying 9Kg for 4 miles.  Seems to work ok. I wouldn't say the weight disappears but I reckon I can probably manage multi-day hikes averaging 10 Kg with no ill effects.  Yay!  :-)