Author Topic: Daysacks  (Read 1253 times)

Islandplodder

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Daysacks
« on: 17:56:33, 24/05/18 »

Though it's lovely to get long days walking, I find that in real life a lot of the walks I do are like the one I did today, 6 miles or so, more or less taking a sandwich somewhere more interesting than the door step on a sunny day.
Contents of rucksack: sandwich, purse with a bit of money and bus pass, pocket size binoculars, reading glasses, phone, car keys, small bottle of water.  After half an hour or so I stuffed in a light fleece.  If there had been a cloud in the sky I might have carried a paclite waterproof.  Compass because it lives there.
My smallest daysack is an Osprey talon 33, which is fine in winter when you have extra layers, spare gloves etc, but today it seemed far too big.  So when I got home I started looking at small daysacks, but just because they are small doesn't mean they come cheaper (reminds me of miniskirts in the 60's!)
What do other people do? pull all the straps tight on a bigger daysack?  Or give in and write a pleading letter to Father Christmas?
There's a Lowe Alpine airzone 14L in the Cotswold sale. I thought that might be going too small, but I suppose all I'm looking for is a handbag to take for a walk.
Any advice would be gratefully received.
 

gunwharfman

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Re: Daysacks
« Reply #1 on: 18:27:48, 24/05/18 »
For day walks when I'm confident about the weather I just use my old 1960s mans handbag, for phone, keys and other bits and pieces.

I have seen people using rather large bumbags but they never look right to me so I've never bothered.

If I take my wet weather coat I just use my cycling 10L rucksack. I've always found it just about right. My next size up is my old Golite Jam, always comfortable, that's the one I use in winter.

sussamb

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Re: Daysacks
« Reply #2 on: 18:41:06, 24/05/18 »
If I want anything smaller than my 35l Lowe Alpine I use a cheap 15l Eurohike, can't see the need to shell out a lot for a small sac O0
Where there's a will ...

Mel

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Re: Daysacks
« Reply #3 on: 19:08:11, 24/05/18 »


My "handbag" which I use for local-ish walks - a Lorenz backpack (technical, it ain't - it's a fashion item I bought from Boyes) - probably only about 10 litres but has 3 zipped compartments which can take a sarnie, small bottle of water, flask/mug.  Purse, phone, keys.  Don't tend to bother with a map/compass on these walks as I generally know the area well enough and have a "brew with a view" spot in mind.  If I need to shed a layer I just tie it round my waist.


Edit: mine is a black version of this:





I also have a "thing" (I affectionately call it my Sporran!) I attach to my belt that holds my camera and GPS phone (and a few boiled sweets) because I like to have easy access to those 3 things. 


Sooooo..... I'm gonna throw in a curve-ball here..... It might be worth looking at children's backpacks that you see in shoe shops and such like - cheaper and just the right size for holding a sarnie and bottle of water, keys/phone/purse, etc..  I'm on the lookout for one with snails on but I have seen a few plain(ish) ones around amongst the ones with pokemon and minions all over them  ;D

« Last Edit: 19:32:25, 24/05/18 by Mel »
No expense spared in pursuit of a bargain ;)
https://snailspacewalks.blogspot.co.uk/

kinkyboots

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Re: Daysacks
« Reply #4 on: 19:11:10, 24/05/18 »
If you're only taking a sandwich for a walk this might be worth a look (plenty of colour options available)

https://www.decathlon.co.uk/arpenaz-10l-hiking-backpack-red-grey-id_8331390.html#

ninthace

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Re: Daysacks
« Reply #5 on: 19:16:23, 24/05/18 »
Mrs N has taken to a  a Lifeventure bum bag for day walks - room for a sarnie, water bottle, phone, sun cream etc.  If she gets too warm she ties her outer layer round her waist. https://www.lifeventure.com/products/bags-and-storage/waist-pack
Solvitur Ambulando

Dyffryn Ardudwy

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Re: Daysacks
« Reply #6 on: 19:36:02, 24/05/18 »
My Camelbak Mule, is a superb daysack.
Numerous pockets, and more than enough capacity to hold waterproofs and a windproof, as well as other essentials.
Its currently my sack of choice however long or short my walk.

sussamb

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Re: Daysacks
« Reply #7 on: 20:12:50, 24/05/18 »
If you're only taking a sandwich for a walk this might be worth a look (plenty of colour options available)

https://www.decathlon.co.uk/arpenaz-10l-hiking-backpack-red-grey-id_8331390.html#

Wow, that is cheap, worth a punt though if all you need is a small sac  O0
Where there's a will ...

sussamb

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Re: Daysacks
« Reply #8 on: 20:16:25, 24/05/18 »
My Camelbak Mule, is a superb daysack.
Numerous pockets, and more than enough capacity to hold waterproofs and a windproof, as well as other essentials.
Its currently my sack of choice however long or short my walk.

Too expensive in my view for a small sac, I can get a decent rucsac that takes a hydration pack for the price camelback charge for not much more that a hydration bag with minimal storage  ;)
Where there's a will ...

Dyffryn Ardudwy

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Re: Daysacks
« Reply #9 on: 13:30:57, 25/05/18 »
I picked mine up for £48 in Blacks, in Cardiff a few years ago.
The thing i like about it, is its almost infinite combinations of adjustments, so should fit just about anyones body contour.
It has three chest straps, which ive never come across in any other sack, and has three compartments, all with their own zips.
Why it has three fully adjustable chest straps i have no idea, but its amongst the most comfortable thing ive ever worn on my shoulders.

I think £48 represented excellent value, and it has sufficient capacity for a full set of waterproofs, Buffalo windshirt, and numerous other items, just enough capacity for a day out in the hills.

It usually retails for around £80 which i agree is a bit too much, so £48 was a keen price, especially when it came with a huge hydration bladder as well.

sussamb

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Re: Daysacks
« Reply #10 on: 13:34:14, 25/05/18 »
I wouldn't even pay that for what in effect is a 9l sac, but good to know you've at least bought something that doesn't just live in your wardrobes  O0
Where there's a will ...

Dyffryn Ardudwy

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Re: Daysacks
« Reply #11 on: 14:04:19, 25/05/18 »
Glad to report that most of my gear has now ended up in the arms of friends in Cardiff.
I quite agree, collecting so much kit over the years, and never using it, was a bit pointless, far better letting others benefit from my folly.

Jim Parkin

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Re: Daysacks
« Reply #12 on: 22:09:02, 27/05/18 »
I saw a quite attractive small daysack in Aldi last week.  I didn't buy it, because I have a 7-year old Alpkit Gourdon-20Ltr  that is great and waterproof (it's a proper drybag as well)

Islandplodder

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Re: Daysacks
« Reply #13 on: 10:00:13, 28/05/18 »

Thank you for all replies, all advice noted.
I think I'll hold fire until I can get to a cheap shop or a sale.  Somehow I can't quite bring myself to spend 75 quid or so on a very small daysack.

Norfolk-Matt

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Re: Daysacks
« Reply #14 on: 08:11:18, 29/05/18 »
My other half picked up an osprey 9 litre pack on a good deal a while ago. She finds it perfect for summer days and it can fit a hydration bladder, drinks in each side if needed, waterproof jacket and trousers and purse etc. She’s very pleased.


I have a 28l Osprey pack which I often find too much for summer day treks & have also been considering getting a nice small pack for the bare essentials.