Author Topic: Paramo Torres  (Read 814 times)

NeilC

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Paramo Torres
« on: 10:25:47, 31/05/18 »
Anyone got any of Paramo's Torres kit?


Sounds like an interesting concept - insulation you wear on the outside of your waterproof as opposed to midlayer.


I can see the convenience but imagine it gets all damp and heavy.

Islandplodder

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Re: Paramo Torres
« Reply #1 on: 11:58:24, 31/05/18 »

Is that the gilet?
If so it is my favourite bit of kit.  It weighs nothing, packs into it's own pocket and goes everywhere with me.  I just throw it on when I stop for lunch or whatever, and I have never had any problem with it getting waterlogged. 
When I bought it I thought it was a bit of a luxury, but am totally converted!

NeilC

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Re: Paramo Torres
« Reply #2 on: 14:42:08, 31/05/18 »
Is that the gilet?
If so it is my favourite bit of kit.  It weighs nothing, packs into it's own pocket and goes everywhere with me.  I just throw it on when I stop for lunch or whatever, and I have never had any problem with it getting waterlogged. 
When I bought it I thought it was a bit of a luxury, but am totally converted!


They do gilets and jackets all called Torres so I assume they're all the same sort of thing.


I have a few Q's if you don't mind:


So how warm would you say it is compared to, say a standard lightish fleece midlayer?
Do you keep it on the outside of your waterproof in prolonged rain, or would you wear it as a mid layer in those conditions?
If you do keep it outside in the rain, how wet does it get? Say it rains for an hour or two and then clears up, you put the wet thing in your rucksack? I'm wondering - then you have a wet insulator which isn't going to be nice if you need it later, say in a tent or whatever?


I'm trying to work out how it would fit in for overnight backpacking after a rainy day. I do have a Paramo jacket and I justify it's extra weight and warmth by not taking as many midlayers. I.e. I count it as a softshell too and take one less fleece layer, At this time of year that would mean thin base-layer, basic fleece, Paramo jacket and maybe by light down jacket if it's gonna be a clear cold night. I run warm and generally the fleece would only see action at stops or in the tent as part of my dry gear. If I was to use a Torres gilet or jacket then I'd be thinking of leaving that fleece at home so as not just to add weight for no real reason. However it that's been rained on during a mountain-top lunch then now I have a damp insulator in the tent with me or the next day. Or am I missing the point?

Islandplodder

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Re: Paramo Torres
« Reply #3 on: 16:32:07, 31/05/18 »

It's much warmer than a fleece.
In light rain it's fine, it dries out very quickly.  In prolonged heavy rain I think I would usually wear it under a jacket, whatever Paramo claim.
I mainly use it in the winter, but have worn it in the summer over a paclite waterproof when it turned suddenly cold.
I get Reynauds, and find that my hands get cold (and white and dead looking) when I stop for lunch in the winter, and using the gilet seems to avoid that.
For me the main advantage is that it is light and packs small and I almost always have it with me, unless it is reliably hot, and it is really easy to put on if I get at all chilled.

archaeoroutes

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Re: Paramo Torres
« Reply #4 on: 22:14:51, 31/05/18 »
I have had both the gilet and jacket for years. Great bits of kit. Work well inside or outside the jacket (collar on gilet more comfortable when fully done up when inside jacket).
When wearing full Paramo layering, they still pump water out, so actually dry the jacket underneath if you put them on having already been rained on. I've not had them soak up water and get heavy except in the most extreme and persistent cpnditions, and even then they were warm and lighter than a fleece of equivalent.
Walking routes visiting ancient sites in Britain's uplands: http://amzn.to/2j91hIj

PeterDevon

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Re: Paramo Torres
« Reply #5 on: 08:58:09, 01/06/18 »
I only use mine when very cold, ie. -5C and blowing 30kts from the east or when you stop to camp, it is very warm, never got it wet though.

NeilC

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Re: Paramo Torres
« Reply #6 on: 17:09:44, 02/06/18 »
Thanks for the input folks. I'm sorely tempted.

NeilC

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Re: Paramo Torres
« Reply #7 on: 13:52:51, 18/06/18 »
So I got one for a reasonable price off ebay.


I think I got the wrong size though :-( I have a Quito in large which is the right size, if not a bit short and a Helki in XL which is too big. So I got this in a L given they say they're sized to be worn over their other kit. But if I try that it's pretty tight and I look a bit stupid really. However I am in the very painful process of losing weight at the mo (at least 2 stone is required) so I might make sense to hold onto it until that's done as that should knock me down a few inches.


pauldawes

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Re: Paramo Torres
« Reply #8 on: 14:35:27, 18/06/18 »
So I got one for a reasonable price off ebay.


I think I got the wrong size though :-( I have a Quito in large which is the right size, if not a bit short and a Helki in XL which is too big. So I got this in a L given they say they're sized to be worn over their other kit. But if I try that it's pretty tight and I look a bit stupid really. However I am in the very painful process of losing weight at the mo (at least 2 stone is required) so I might make sense to hold onto it until that's done as that should knock me down a few inches.


I know that wearing it over top of another jacket is the "official line"...but I don't think I've ever worn mine that way...I have used it a fair bit on chilly, windy dry days just as a top layer over base layer, apart from anything else because it's got so many useful pockets.


The guy who sold it be predicted I'd never go out in cold enough conditions to warrant using it "the right way". He got that right.

NeilC

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Re: Paramo Torres
« Reply #9 on: 14:49:33, 18/06/18 »

I know that wearing it over top of another jacket is the "official line"...but I don't think I've ever worn mine that way...I have used it a fair bit on chilly, windy dry days just as a top layer over base layer, apart from anything else because it's got so many useful pockets.


The guy who sold it be predicted I'd never go out in cold enough conditions to warrant using it "the right way". He got that right.


The only situation I can see myself putting in over the top would be in the winter when you get to the top of a peak and you suddenly feel the chill but you want to stop for a snack. But really - is it THAT much hassle taking your jacket off and on to stick a mid-layer on? You've got to take off your pack and get it out anyway.

pauldawes

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Re: Paramo Torres
« Reply #10 on: 15:24:07, 18/06/18 »

The only situation I can see myself putting in over the top would be in the winter when you get to the top of a peak and you suddenly feel the chill but you want to stop for a snack. But really - is it THAT much hassle taking your jacket off and on to stick a mid-layer on? You've got to take off your pack and get it out anyway.


I think potentially the advantage is if you start out on a really cold day...cold enough to wear Torres from start. Then as you "work hard" and start to warm up, it's easier to slip Torres off, than it would be to take jacket off, take mid layer off, put mid layer away, put outer jacket back on.


I agree with you that time difference isn't that much on a one off basis...but some friends on a longish walk tend to take layers off/ put them back on quite often...when they come to base of a steep climb, for example, they will shed a layer. For anybody like that, slight extra ease of taking Torres off/ on mounts up.


But...as I've already mentioned I can't remember any walks cold enough to really justify using mine. The guy who sold it me predicted that unless I went out in Scottish winters that my existing jacket (A Velez Adventure Light) would be warm enough without the Torres. And I guess your own jackets (the Heiki and the Quito) are warmer than the Velez Light?

NeilC

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Re: Paramo Torres
« Reply #11 on: 15:47:23, 18/06/18 »

I think potentially the advantage is if you start out on a really cold day...cold enough to wear Torres from start. Then as you "work hard" and start to warm up, it's easier to slip Torres off, than it would be to take jacket off, take mid layer off, put mid layer away, put outer jacket back on.


I agree with you that time difference isn't that much on a one off basis...but some friends on a longish walk tend to take layers off/ put them back on quite often...when they come to base of a steep climb, for example, they will shed a layer. For anybody like that, slight extra ease of taking Torres off/ on mounts up.


But...as I've already mentioned I can't remember any walks cold enough to really justify using mine. The guy who sold it me predicted that unless I went out in Scottish winters that my existing jacket (A Velez Adventure Light) would be warm enough without the Torres. And I guess your own jackets (the Heiki and the Quito) are warmer than the Velez Light?

Yes I can see how that would work, especially if you just had a daypack



I think the Quito is the same sort of insulation value as the VAL, the Quito weighs a little bit less so I guess the same materials but less of them.


I've been out in the hills in Jan in the Helki with only a merino base and I've been warm enough whilst moving. Seems to me that the combination of insulation+windproof material is greater than the sum of its parts.  In fact I've taken to wearing the lightest synthetic base I could find unless it's very cold

archaeoroutes

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Re: Paramo Torres
« Reply #12 on: 22:30:40, 18/06/18 »
But really - is it THAT much hassle taking your jacket off and on to stick a mid-layer on? You've got to take off your pack and get it out anyway.
When it's really chucking it down, overlayering is much nicer than getting your base layer and inside of your waterproof wet. [size=78%]Same for if it is really cold. And add in strong wind trying to blow away the jacket you took off and you either do some fancy trip juggling or shove the wet thing in your sack if not overlayering.[/size]
[size=78%]Of course, trad layering is fine and doable, but overlayering is easier and less unpleasant.[/size]
Walking routes visiting ancient sites in Britain's uplands: http://amzn.to/2j91hIj

NeilC

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Re: Paramo Torres
« Reply #13 on: 22:37:24, 18/06/18 »
When it's really chucking it down, overlayering is much nicer than getting your base layer and inside of your waterproof wet. [size=78%]Same for if it is really cold. And add in strong wind trying to blow away the jacket you took off and you either do some fancy trip juggling or shove the wet thing in your sack if not overlayering.[/size]
[size=78%]Of course, trad layering is fine and doable, but overlayering is easier and less unpleasant.[/size]


Well if I can keep on this wretched diet and shrink back to a healthy size, I should get the chance to experience the benefits of overlayering it!