Author Topic: Trail food?  (Read 2236 times)

mananddog

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Re: Trail food?
« Reply #15 on: 19:27:08, 04/06/18 »

Salami is great. :smitten:


I also make my own Salami!!!! (and Chorizo)

Owen

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Re: Trail food?
« Reply #16 on: 19:43:54, 04/06/18 »
Some savoury crackers and a tube of squishy cheese?  (crackers in a little plastic tub wrapped in a paper towel keeps them dry and crumble free).


Yes, I've tried this over a long weekend but wasn't to sure how long the cheeses would last. Just need to find the right container for the crackers.

Or what about a Pepperami?  They're savoury and definitely high in calories/energy.

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hadn't thought of those I'll give them a try. Thanks.


Dried fruit is one of my staples, Lidl do a good selection but I also dry apples at home in the autumn, and my home made Biltong/jerky which is about a 10th of the cost of that stuff you buy in little foil bags in the supermarket.


So, how do you make Biltong/jerky?

mananddog

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Re: Trail food?
« Reply #17 on: 20:07:01, 04/06/18 »

There are two ways one for winter and one for summer.


I get cheap beef from the supermarket, usually that which is being sold cheap, preferably minute steaks or really thin sliced. Silverside does well. I like to have slices about 5mm thick. I cover them with a mix of salt, coriander, black pepper and some chilli. This mix is spread over the meat which is laid out on a clean plate. Put this in the fridge for 6 hours, this will cure the meat and draw out the liquid.


Take the meat and dab it dry with kitchen paper - do not rub the cure off. In winter I hang this in my garage for 12 to 14 days until it is ready. Once it is dry put it in a paper bag and it will last for 6 months or more. I put it in a plastic bag when I take it away to keep it dry.


In summer when there are more flies around and the garage is not so good an idea you can put it in an oven on 50C until it is dry - keep opening the over door to get the humidity down. I have a dehydrator which I use in summer, overnight at 40C and it is dry.

Mel

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Re: Trail food?
« Reply #18 on: 22:26:58, 04/06/18 »

Yes, I've tried this over a long weekend but wasn't to sure how long the cheeses would last. Just need to find the right container for the crackers.


Primula cheese spread in a tube lasts a lot longer than 2 weeks, unrefrigerated.  So do Mini Baby Bel cheeses. 
No expense spared in pursuit of a bargain ;)
https://snailspacewalks.blogspot.co.uk/

jimbob

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Re: Trail food?
« Reply #19 on: 22:46:52, 04/06/18 »

.  So do Mini Baby Bel cheeses.
Mmmmm baby bel  and a hard boiled egg. Followed by fruit pastilles for dessert. What more can a walker  want.

Too little, too late, too bad......

Mel

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Re: Trail food?
« Reply #20 on: 22:48:11, 04/06/18 »
A pint to wash it all down?  ;D
No expense spared in pursuit of a bargain ;)
https://snailspacewalks.blogspot.co.uk/

jimbob

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Re: Trail food?
« Reply #21 on: 22:52:57, 04/06/18 »
And plenty of breeze in tent to dispel condensation :D
Too little, too late, too bad......

Rather be walking

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Re: Trail food?
« Reply #22 on: 12:16:53, 05/06/18 »

It would be lucky to survive more than a few hours in mine before it got eaten  ;)

Same here  :)

Jon.
““The hardest part was coming to terms with the constant dispiriting discovery that there is always more hill.”
― Bill Bryson, A Walk in the Woods

KimE

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Re: Trail food?
« Reply #23 on: 22:24:40, 08/06/18 »
Hard rye bread with a tube of soft cheese and a cup of dehydrated soup.

gunwharfman

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Re: Trail food?
« Reply #24 on: 09:57:40, 09/06/18 »
A large tin of Ambrosia creamed rice, or similar, when stopped for a rest, then a snooze. When I last hiked the Pennine Way, I bought a can in Bellingham, nursed it all day and ate it as soon as I got onto Hadrians Wall. Wonderful!

Owen

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Re: Trail food?
« Reply #25 on: 18:37:43, 09/06/18 »
Hard rye bread with a tube of soft cheese and a cup of dehydrated soup.


I'd forgotten all about rye bread as it's not very common here, I did manage to find one shop in Stirling that sold it. Thanks for the tip.

Ralph

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Re: Trail food?
« Reply #26 on: 20:35:46, 09/06/18 »
Thanks  for the rye bread tip, I love it but never  thought of carrying it,.along with squirty cheese it should be fine.I've seen it in packs of 6 slices, so ideal for a day or two out.

scottk

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Re: Trail food?
« Reply #27 on: 23:43:29, 09/06/18 »
Rye bread is available in Lidl. Goes well with pickled herring and curried egg!

KimE

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Re: Trail food?
« Reply #28 on: 16:46:09, 12/06/18 »
Yes i always have a tube of cheese with me on walks. At home i use Swedish caviar in tube on the rye bread.

Ikea has it.

"Rye bread is available in Lidl. Goes well with pickled herring and curried egg!"


Try fermented herring with potato and onion on thin hard rye-barley bread.

« Last Edit: 16:50:47, 12/06/18 by KimE »

alan de enfield

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Re: Trail food?
« Reply #29 on: 17:26:18, 12/06/18 »


Try fermented herring with potato and onion on thin hard rye-barley bread.



Many years ago the Managing Director of our Norwegian operation sent us some cans of Herring, Not liking fish I gave my can away, others kept theirs.


At a meeting a few weeks later he asked what everyone thought of the Herring - most had thrown the cans in the waste, when asked why, they explained that the cans had 'expanded' and had 'blown' into the shape of a football.


He said - that is the time to eat it - it is at its best when the can has 'blown'.


Weird tastes these Scandinavians.