Author Topic: Walking Poles  (Read 884 times)

rootsoflife5

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Walking Poles
« on: 21:20:08, 07/02/18 »
Can anyone please advise me as to which walking poles would be the best for trekking in Peru which I go to in 4 weeks time.  I have heard that Leki are a good make.


I would appreciate your views thank you

motorlaunch

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Re: Walking Poles
« Reply #1 on: 22:41:37, 07/02/18 »
Yes, leki is a good make. Which ever you decide on, make sure that they collapse or can be taken apart to fit in your luggage.

Skip

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Re: Walking Poles
« Reply #2 on: 08:42:43, 08/02/18 »
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gunwharfman

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Re: Walking Poles
« Reply #3 on: 10:18:22, 08/02/18 »
I've had alumininium ones and lighter carbon fibre poles as well. I snapped one carbon fibre pole across a cows head milli-seconds before she biffed me in the chest and knocked me off my feet. A year later and I snapped a second one when I inadvertantly stuck my pole in between two rocks as I was walking fast along a rocky trail. I couldn't pull it out fast enough, all I heard was CRACK! and that was it. I still prefer carbon fibre over aluminium though. Aluminium can bend and I personally hated it when I once could no longer retract one pole due to this problem. It was my fault, I stood on it as I was erecting my tent. My main problem with both of these models, their grip demands made my wrists ache and after a few hours use, the area between my thumb and forfinger always became sore.

The poles I use now are carbon fibre Pacerpoles, for me, much more comfortable for my hands and more effective I believe than ordinary grip poles. I also now know that they help me to walk better on the flat and uphill and downhill as well which for me is important especially if I have to use the all day. The only downside of Pacerpoles as I see it is the grip area, although its very comfortable to hold its also a bit bigger than the standard design grip areas. The Pacerpoles are great to walk with but can be a bit fiddlly when I want to secure to my rucksack (Osprey 48L) and I don't want to stop walking as I do it. Not really a problem as practice makes perfect, I now know the knack of how to do it without fuss.

Jac

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Re: Walking Poles
« Reply #4 on: 13:41:46, 09/02/18 »
When I walked the Inca Trail we were not allowed to use our walking poles in case the tips damaged the surface. Admittedly this was a few (15 I think!) years back. They sold us bamboo poles with Peru type cloth on the hand end. They were very cheap and amazingly we were allowed to bring them back as hand luggage on the plane - perhaps they counted as walking sticks - though they had to go through the scanner to make sure we'd not hollowed them out and fille dthem with something interesting.
They have pride of place in the hall pot even now :)

Enjoy Peru - we did
Most walks start by finding the way out of the car park

ninthace

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Re: Walking Poles
« Reply #5 on: 15:01:12, 09/02/18 »
Weren't rubber tips allowed? - I always use them, protects the tips and much quieter.
Solvitur Ambulando

Jac

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Re: Walking Poles
« Reply #6 on: 15:28:37, 09/02/18 »
Weren't rubber tips allowed? - I always use them, protects the tips and much quieter.

In all honesty I can't remember, though can't see why they shouldn't have been.
Most walks start by finding the way out of the car park

wobblyknees

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Re: Walking Poles
« Reply #7 on: 22:16:53, 09/02/18 »
My main problem with both of these models, their grip demands made my wrists ache and after a few hours use, the area between my thumb and forfinger always became sore.


I used to have that problem until I learned to use the straps properly. I was climbing Mont Blanc (not to top -only as far Tete Rousse refuge). The same area of my hands were raw and sore from using the poles to ease the burden on my legs. A very kind gentleman coming down saw that I was in pain and showed me how to use the straps. I've never looked back since. Now, I barely grip the poles and often just use tips of thumb and fingers to stay in contact with the poles.
When I think about it, gripping the poles all day is a huge waste of energy when the fleshy part of my hand can take the weight far easier and less painfully through the strap.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8jH9e4QGUP4


Skip

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Re: Walking Poles
« Reply #8 on: 22:30:36, 09/02/18 »
... grip demands made my wrists ache and after a few hours use, the area between my thumb and forfinger always became sore.

See 'Pete's Pole Pages' at the link I posted earlier in this thread:
http://medphys.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/gear/poles/poles2.html

Peter Clinch advises: "The important thing is to let the strap take the weight, which means it should be snug and allow a loose, comfortable grip from the fingers which are just there to guide the pole, not to take a load" (my emphasis).


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nesty

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Re: Walking Poles
« Reply #9 on: 23:22:30, 09/02/18 »
TBH, until last year I poo poo'd walking poles. However, in 2017, I thought I'd give them a go in the Peak District & they proved invaluable. 
I didn't fork out out on Leki's, but a pair of karrimor (shock) carbon's. Did the job.
Have to say, I would never do without poles now. Great for steadying yourself and pulling yourself up hills (when used correctly). It's important to develop a good technique!   

gunwharfman

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Re: Walking Poles
« Reply #10 on: 11:03:24, 10/02/18 »
Didn't work for me, tried the strap method, adjusting height and even not using vthem, but my hands still ached and became sore. Maybe my hands are just too delicate? As stated I've found the answer that suits me, the Pacerpoles, makes a world of a difference.

ninthace

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Re: Walking Poles
« Reply #11 on: 11:37:24, 10/02/18 »
Didn't work for me, tried the strap method, adjusting height and even not using vthem, but my hands still ached and became sore. Maybe my hands are just too delicate? As stated I've found the answer that suits me, the Pacerpoles, makes a world of a difference.
You are not alone.  I used to get sore spots or even blisters on my hands where the strap chafed on the skin between the thumb and forefinger. Tended to happen on longer walks in rough country where more power was needed. Like you - Pacerpoles were the answer.
Solvitur Ambulando

Dyffryn Ardudwy

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Re: Walking Poles
« Reply #12 on: 11:53:45, 10/02/18 »
The only ones ive used, are ones with a cork grip, and they appear to have a more comfortable hold, than ones made of plastic, and for some reason, my hands do not get as sweaty.
Ive used them three times, and found them a nuisance, but they have their uses, depending on the right conditions.

One thing i do remember many years ago, when i was an avid Challenge walker in South Wales, was that many competitors liked to use a walking pole, or some kind of support, as it somehow alleviated arm and shoulder tiredness over long distances.

A modern Walking pole, with its adjustability, certainly has its place in the right environment, but i found they did not work for me.