Author Topic: WALKING POLES  (Read 2324 times)

dinger

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WALKING POLES
« on: 09:02:50, 12/02/18 »

Over the years ive refrained myself from using them, and wondered why some people use them especially on flat paths it seems more habit rather then needing them, but recently decending mountains/hills my knees are feeling the strain.
Do any of you guys not bother, and if you have them do you believe in paying silly prices just to save a few grams?

geordie33

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Re: WALKING POLES
« Reply #1 on: 09:14:18, 12/02/18 »
I always used to say I would never use them until I fell down a few times.Not much flat round here but still handy in slippy conditions and on rocky stiles.Used to have a pricey Leki but now use an £8 mountain warehouse which has a cork handle.Just use the 1 and have noticed little real weight difference.

fernman

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Re: WALKING POLES
« Reply #2 on: 10:05:41, 12/02/18 »
Dinger, just wait till you get older, you'll want them then! Sounds from the knee strain you're heading that way.
My street has a slight hill going up to the main road and sometimes when I'm on my way to the shops I think I'd find it easier with my poles!

Geordie, try taking a bit more water with it! Seriously, I think one of the major things with selecting poles is how comfortable the hand grips feel to you. There were a few different makes and models to choose from when I bought mine (more coirrectly, when I got my wife to give me some for Christmas) and one or two I didn't feel happy with at all.

gunwharfman

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Re: WALKING POLES
« Reply #3 on: 10:22:58, 12/02/18 »
I can understand why you query the cost. When I started to use sticks I bought a pair (aliminium) for a tenner, from a shop in Keswick. They worked fine until I wanted to move 'up' in quality. I managed to buy a 'better' pair (aluminimum again) for around £40 (retail they were about £100) but I didn't notice any difference in any way between the 'cheap' model and the 'expensive' one! I then wanted to move 'up' again, this time to carbon fibre. It was just a 'I want' consumer thing! I noted an Immeadiate difference however, they were lighter than the aliminium ones but still did the same job as my cheap sticks. They were from Alpkit, they only cost £40. Then I broke one (across a charging cows head, didn't stop her, she still biffed me!) and then snapped another one which became stuck between two rocks. I almost bought a new cheap pair but then decided to splash out on Pacerpoles. It was Percy's fault, he let me borrow his for a short time, last year at the Glenridding meet, after 10 minutes I was sold!

I bought the carbon fibre Pacerpoles, I thought they were expensive, about £90 and they still do the same job, but the holding position is different, which totally personally prefer.

On the the flat, I do not have to use them, but I am often too bone idle to put them away. They are very helpful if you fancy 'swaggering with a jaunty air' for a while, or feel the need to have them to hand to deter cows or wayward farmyard dogs.

For me, they prove to be the most useful on ascents, but especially descents. Due to the Pacerpoles hand grip design I can now push down on them to help me, rather than having to pull myself up, could make my arms ache as well. When I used standard grip poles I never felt properly in control, especially when climbing down. With the Pacerpoles I just feel they help me more when descending. One thing I have learned however is when coming down, make sure the pole sections are properly tightened, otherwise your body weight can make them become shorter than you want them to be. Not well explained but its all to do with the grip!!!

fit old bird

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Re: WALKING POLES
« Reply #4 on: 13:32:49, 12/02/18 »
My friend gave me one once, I used to walk her choc lab, and struggled to stay upright on icy ground. It helped. I tried it while out walking and although I don't have dodgy knees, it helped on rocky and muddy descents. However it annoyed me having to carry it around when I didn't need it. I don't bother with a pole now.


Ilona

Addingham

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Re: WALKING POLES
« Reply #5 on: 16:50:25, 12/02/18 »
Over the years ive refrained myself from using them, and wondered why some people use them especially on flat paths it seems more habit rather then needing them, but recently decending mountains/hills my knees are feeling the strain.
Do any of you guys not bother, and if you have them do you believe in paying silly prices just to save a few grams?


They do help. IMHO. Although buying Lek's are over the top. Unless you have too much money. :D  Plenty on the market especially now the Chinese are into the game. As for shock absorption a lot of Cr*p.

ninthace

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Re: WALKING POLES
« Reply #6 on: 17:59:08, 12/02/18 »

They do help. IMHO. Although buying Lek's are over the top. Unless you have too much money. :D  Plenty on the market especially now the Chinese are into the game. As for shock absorption a lot of Cr*p.


I have used them with and without shock absorbers over a long period. My present poles (pacers) do not have shocks but my last 2 pairs did. Your are entitled to your opinion but I cannot agree with you -I found using a set of poles  with shocks properly and continuously for extended periods was an altogether more comfortable experience than conventional poles.
Solvitur Ambulando

NeilC

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Re: WALKING POLES
« Reply #7 on: 09:12:11, 13/02/18 »
Over the years ive refrained myself from using them, and wondered why some people use them especially on flat paths it seems more habit rather then needing them, but recently decending mountains/hills my knees are feeling the strain.
Do any of you guys not bother, and if you have them do you believe in paying silly prices just to save a few grams?


I've got some but I generally don't like them. If I'm going somewhere really wet like Dartmoor I'll take one as a way of working out deep bogs are but overall they get on my nerves.


I don't think one can deny that they do take the strain of the knees going downhill though so worth a punt to see if they help.


No I wouldn't pay a lot to save a few grams. I got them from Decathlon and they were cheap.

Rather be walking

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Re: WALKING POLES
« Reply #8 on: 12:31:13, 13/02/18 »
I have only used one pole, bought in 2000. Basher with cork handle.  O0
To me a walking pole is like a companion.
I feel lost without one.

Jon.
LDP Done:SWCP,SDW,IOWCP,HadriansWallPath,NDW,ClarendonWay,HangersWay,C2C,CaminoDeSantiago.

dinger

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Re: WALKING POLES
« Reply #9 on: 12:46:08, 13/02/18 »

I was told by a mountain leader how a woman broke her wrist with one on hes guided walks. Basically she had the strap around her wrist and pole got jammed in between a rock and she fell which resulted her hand twisted around the pole while she fell.


ninthace

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Re: WALKING POLES
« Reply #10 on: 13:17:10, 13/02/18 »
I was told by a mountain leader how a woman broke her wrist with one on hes guided walks. Basically she had the strap around her wrist and pole got jammed in between a rock and she fell which resulted her hand twisted around the pole while she fell.
And did he tell you how many ankles did not get sprained or wrists weren’t broken because of a pole preventing a fall?
Solvitur Ambulando

dinger

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Re: WALKING POLES
« Reply #11 on: 13:30:03, 13/02/18 »

It can work both ways really cant it? some times hands are needed and not wrapped around poles.
I'm not saying they are a bad thing, but I see many who have them for and wonder why especially on flat ground, like they are Nordic walking.
I just like to have my hands ready for unexpected fall, or getting map out, drinkimg ect with out hassle of 2 poles in my hand.

jimbob

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Re: WALKING POLES
« Reply #12 on: 15:26:13, 13/02/18 »
Nordic walking as seen in parks etcetera is a form of aerobic exercise where the sticks are used in such a way as to encourage upper body and arm movement thus burning of more calories than by just using legs alone.. 

Did the Mountain Leader know how poles should be correctly held and did he guide the lady into doing so? Or was he a non user that just decided to blame the poles. In which case it may have been the users own fault.
Too little, too late, too bad......

dinger

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Re: WALKING POLES
« Reply #13 on: 15:44:49, 13/02/18 »
You don't get shown or taught on Ml course.

dinger

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Re: WALKING POLES
« Reply #14 on: 15:51:03, 13/02/18 »
If I was taking a guided walk, it would be there option but no way its the guides fault if accident occurs with them. I would advise to put them away for scrambles obviously.