Author Topic: WALKING POLES  (Read 941 times)

fernman

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1581
Re: WALKING POLES
« Reply #15 on: 18:01:35, 13/02/18 »
I just like to have my hands ready for unexpected fall, or getting map out, drinkimg ect with out hassle of 2 poles in my hand.

If you are using them properly the straps are around your wrists or base of your hands. When you need your hands for something you let go of the grips and your hands are free to do whatever you need to, with the poles dangling from your wrists. If they are a bit restricting while you do this, take a step or two forward so the poles are at a 45 degree angle behind you.

wobblyknees

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 438
Re: WALKING POLES
« Reply #16 on: 20:20:22, 13/02/18 »
I bought a pair of these for about 25 last year. They fulfill all my requirements and I don't see the point of spending more money.
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Brotree-2-Pack-Trekking-Walking-Poles-Hiking-Sticks-with-EVA-Foam-Grip-Flip-L/192264306278?hash=item2cc3d87e66:g:XscAAOSwxBdZgMBG


I would never again use anti-shock poles as I believe the shock absorbers absorb too much energy over a days walking.


I like to adjust the length of my poles to suit the gradient I am walking. The quickest and easiest way to do this is to use lever locks/cam locks/flip locks system rather than the twist lock system. I always found the twist lock system most unreliable. Too tight they can be extremely difficult to unlock. Too loose they can slip into each other causing an accident, especially on a steep descent. The lever locks have a much more positive locking action, can be set a lot tighter and are simple to unlock.


I never use the straps on a steep descent, using the poles only for stability. I've seen / heard of too many sprained wrists.

Addingham

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 93
Re: WALKING POLES
« Reply #17 on: 05:33:34, 14/02/18 »

I have used them with and without shock absorbers over a long period. My present poles (pacers) do not have shocks but my last 2 pairs did. Your are entitled to your opinion but I cannot agree with you -I found using a set of poles  with shocks properly and continuously for extended periods was an altogether more comfortable experience than conventional poles.


Everyone to their opinion. ;D  Although are you suggesting I use them incorrectly after 25+ years?  ;)

ninthace

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1955
Re: WALKING POLES
« Reply #18 on: 08:50:35, 14/02/18 »

Everyone to their opinion. ;D  Although are you suggesting I use them incorrectly after 25+ years?  ;)
I reckon 90% of the folk I see are not using them correctly so who knows? 😁
Solvitur Ambulando

dinger

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 179
Re: WALKING POLES
« Reply #19 on: 09:11:08, 14/02/18 »

I think many people just not using them for the correct purposes ie rocky crags, ect .
Ive walked with groups who have them and they waving them around like swords faffing around when climbing over stiles almost taking individuals eyes out. :D

Addingham

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 93
Re: WALKING POLES
« Reply #20 on: 09:24:13, 14/02/18 »
I reckon 90% of the folk I see are not using them correctly so who knows? 😁


I must be in the upper 10 percentile then. ;D

fernman

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1581
Re: WALKING POLES
« Reply #21 on: 09:26:49, 14/02/18 »
I always found the twist lock system most unreliable.

I never collapse my poles, I leave them permanently at the length I want them, but sometimes when I'm halfway through a day walk I discover that one, always the same one, has become about an inch shorter than the other. I loosen the lower twist joint, adjust the length and tighten it up again. Sometimes that is sufficient, other times I might have to do it three times during a walk. When either of my sons visits me, I get the offending pole out and we hold one of the lower sections each and twist hard in opposite directions. That sorts it for about three months or so before it starts happening again.

ninthace

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1955
Re: WALKING POLES
« Reply #22 on: 09:43:57, 14/02/18 »
I have found that carbon fibre poles with twist locks sometimes need a retighten after about the first 10 mins if the weather is particularly cold and the poles have been kept in a warm car.
Solvitur Ambulando

wobblyknees

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 438
Re: WALKING POLES
« Reply #23 on: 10:02:23, 14/02/18 »
I reckon 90% of the folk I see are not using them correctly so who knows? 😁
O0 O0 O0  I agree.


Ive walked with groups who have them and they waving them around like swords faffing around when climbing over stiles almost taking individuals eyes out. :D
The most dangerous behavior I've seen around walking poles comes from people walking too close behind a pole user on a steep ascent. If a pole used for propulsion loses purchase, it usually stabs out backwards near eye level of the follower. I always keep a healthy distance from a poler in front of me on a steep ascent.
[size=78%]
[/font][/size]
[size=78%]
[/size] I loosen the lower twist joint, adjust the length and tighten it up again. Sometimes that is sufficient, other times I might have to do it three times during a walk. When either of my sons visits me, I get the offending pole out and we hold one of the lower sections each and twist hard in opposite directions. That sorts it for about three months or so before it starts happening again.
Why bother? Treat yourself to a pair of lever locks. You won't know the luxury.

Deolman

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 99
Re: WALKING POLES
« Reply #24 on: 11:46:02, 14/02/18 »
I have used poles for a number of years and they have prevented many a fall where the ground has been uneven etc.  True I do not use them as per the perfectionists but they are helpful ascending and descending steep slopes particularly as one of my knees tends to have its 'off-days'  I just buy cheap ones, last pair 8 for two from Go Outdoors, then if I happen to lose one it is not a major loss.

gunwharfman

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1394
Re: WALKING POLES
« Reply #25 on: 13:01:20, 14/02/18 »
Yes, lever locks I think are better but not a good enough reason for to go back to the old type of poles. Pity that Pacerpoles dont sell them with lever locks.

ninthace

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1955
Re: WALKING POLES
« Reply #26 on: 13:14:24, 14/02/18 »
Yes, lever locks I think are better but not a good enough reason for to go back to the old type of poles. Pity that Pacerpoles dont sell them with lever locks.


http://pacerpole.com/component/content/article/109
Solvitur Ambulando

gunwharfman

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1394
Re: WALKING POLES
« Reply #27 on: 14:41:00, 14/02/18 »
Well, blow me down! I obviously missed that when I chose to buy mine.

Walk66

  • New Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2
Re: WALKING POLES
« Reply #28 on: 15:01:50, 18/02/18 »
I find they help on uneven ground and they are useful for knocking brambles out of the way.

humansnail

  • New Member
  • *
  • Posts: 19
Re: WALKING POLES
« Reply #29 on: 17:16:57, 18/02/18 »

I originally bought some very cheap ones, used them once or twice and never bothered with them much after that. They used to hurt my hands after a few hours and they were quite heavy.


Then I bought some of the previously mentioned Alpkit carbon fibre ones for 40 quid after trying my mates. Incredibly light and much more comfortable to use. I don't use them all the time but I find them useful in the following situations:
Walking on wet/slippery/boggy ground
Crossing streams. My balance isn't the best and I find them really useful when jumping from rock to rock.
Steep ascents and descents.
When carrying camping gear/heavy pack. It's nice to be able to just rest on them for a while to have a breather!