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Long Distance Walks / Re: Walked Hadrian's Wall Path for my 60th
« Last post by FatBaldDuck on Today at 12:10:30 »
'Twas interesting - met dozens of people along the path - France, Netherlands, Denmark, Germany & America.  Many from England, but only 3 from the north.  We talked with lady working at Segedunum, and asked her about people walking the entire path - she told us mainly Americans & Canadians.  We asked about locals - no, not many locals.  My wife knew why - she grew up in Whitley Bay & they new ALL about the wall & the Romans - school reports, field trips, reports about the field trips, dioramas, etc - they were saturated by the damn Romans & damn Hadrian & his wall!  She was more "excited" about walking across the country than about seeing the tiny bit of wall still extant!?!  The cities, villages & wider places in the road we visited & stayed were fun. Beer is always good & the food was food.   8)
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Two great spots for photos of Derwentwater are Castle Crag and the Terrace. Both in the Borrowdale valley.
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Gear / Re: Advice on wide feeting walking boots
« Last post by Bigfoot_Mike on Today at 12:03:47 »
Yep, that would be a good option. But there is a couple of other factors. Some might not want or be able to afford a pair of Altberg, they may want to just get a pair of walking boots or shoes (or even ordinary casual shoes and use them for walking) or other makes of Boots. They might find it difficult or expensive just to get there, So the more choice a person has, the more chance they have of finding a comfortable pair of boots. The major point that I reckon is needed, is to get your feet properly measured and then you have a chance of getting comfortable footwear.  The next problem is the variety of  sizes with different makes that are supposed to be the same size, eg 11g. So for me, I think that measurement and advice from shoemakers or fitters, is the first point of call if there's one comparatively local.
It just shows how many of us find it not easy to get a pair of boots/shoes that will fit comfortably, so the more choice and info, the better.


You are right about the price, especially if any customisation is needed. Also sizing: my office shoes are 11 extra wide, my Merrill Moabs are 13UK and my new Altbergs are 12W.


Non-leather boots, such as the Merrells, may be more suitable for people with awkward shaped feet, as they have more flexibility. They can also be cheaper. There are cheaper than the Moabs, which cost me £103 for the mid-height version, but I couldn’t find any other boot that was wide enough and in the required size.
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Gear / Re: Advice on wide feeting walking boots
« Last post by Troggy on Today at 11:53:58 »
I believe you can order different sizes for each foot from Altberg. The boots can be steamed to adjust for any particular foot issues. Both these option would require a premier retailer or a factory visit. Altberg will also customise boots or build you a custom last. The price starts gets higher as the customisation increases.
Yep, that would be a good option. But there is a couple of other factors. Some might not want or be able to afford a pair of Altberg, they may want to just get a pair of walking boots or shoes (or even ordinary casual shoes and use them for walking) or other makes of Boots. They might find it difficult or expensive just to get there, So the more choice a person has, the more chance they have of finding a comfortable pair of boots. The major point that I reckon is needed, is to get your feet properly measured and then you have a chance of getting comfortable footwear.  The next problem is the variety of  sizes with different makes that are supposed to be the same size, eg 11g. So for me, I think that measurement and advice from shoemakers or fitters, is the first point of call if there's one comparatively local.
It just shows how many of us find it not easy to get a pair of boots/shoes that will fit comfortably, so the more choice and info, the better.


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Wales / Re: Crib Goch Foxes Path
« Last post by fernman on Today at 11:41:31 »
This topic is of interest to me because I attempted the route several years ago, and failed. That could almost be me that vghikers wrote about above!

Firstly, the name: I have a collection of book references, snippets from articles and web links about the route, half of which call it the Foxes or Foxs Path and the rest call it the Goat Path, so take your pick. Further confusion is caused by there also being a Fox's Path on Cadair Idris.

If you go eastwards from Cwm Glas towards the North Ridge there is a distinctive 'notch' in the ridge to aim for, and while there is no path it is easy walking on grassy terraces. East of the ridge, though, all I found was a faint little sheeps trod (or goats!) that soon disappeared.

However, there was a trip report six years ago http://www.walkingforum.co.uk/index.php?topic=18644.0 that included near its start a photo showing a very clear path at the Bwlch Moch end.

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My first thought is that you have a big list for 4 days!


Where are you staying? It might be best to just stick to that area, as the roads in the Lakes are often windy and slow, and it can take longer than you think to get from A to B.

My advice is to be adaptable and be prepared to deviate from your list - at this time of year it is highly likely that weather will disrupt your plans. The forecast even suggests that we may get some snow on the hills! Bowfell, for instance, is a big walk up high in remote country, and it would be good to have a Plan B.


Helpful as always Richard. Thanks.


Yep, we're as prepared as we can be for bad weather. If we can't get to do something we won't be stuck for a plan B. We'll just relax near one of the lakes probably, which won't be a problem.


And yep, I know it's a lot to do but we're generally very good at packing a LOT into a short trip. We might need to cut some walks a bit short but we'll see about that at the time. We generally get a good move on while walking and don't make many stops. Bear in mind that the photo spots will be a very quick hit and run and the amount of walking we have planned should be just about doable, but that is why I was asking if we needed to drop one, which would you lose. Bowfell was the one I was considering skipping due to the reasons you mention but then it's not too long a walk and looks very much worth the effort...


We're staying in Grange just south of Derwent Water so we're pretty well situated for most of what we want to do and I'll plan the hell out of the itinerary to make sure we maximise our time spent.
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Welcome / Re: Hi from North Yorkshire.
« Last post by richardh1905 on Today at 11:25:36 »

Hi Bob, welcome from windy Orkney!


..and congratulations!
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My first thought is that you have a big list for 4 days!


Where are you staying? It might be best to just stick to that area, as the roads in the Lakes are often windy and slow, and it can take longer than you think to get from A to B.

My advice is to be adaptable and be prepared to deviate from your list - at this time of year it is highly likely that weather will disrupt your plans. The forecast even suggests that we may get some snow on the hills! Bowfell, for instance, is a big walk up high in remote country, and it would be good to have a Plan B.


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General Walking Discussion / Re: First multi-day hike?
« Last post by gunwharfman on Today at 11:15:27 »
As a Belgium citizen how about hiking on one of the WW1 walks to Ypres, Vimy Ridge or the Somme or further along the 'front line' to Verdun, to be there on November 11th?

Get a train to Caen and then hike a circular walk south on the GR36 through the Suisse Normandie area to Thurry Harcourt, then return from there to Caen on the GR36 Varient route. Takes 4 to 7 days, depending on your walking speed and how much time you want to hang around in one or more places.

To know your choices, for example all over France, I also suggest you go on www.gr-infos.com, ALL of the French GR routes are displayed, in great detail. At the bottom of the main linear routes page there is a whole list of circular routes.

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Hi guys, my lovely wife and I are heading to the Lake District this weekend for the first time. To say we're hugely looking forward to it is a massive understatement.


As usual I'm looking for a bit of your sagely advice please.


So the hitlist for a VERY busy few days from Friday to Monday is going to be:


WALKS


1. Catbells
2. Bowfell
3. Walla Crag / Ashness Bridge
4. Borrowdale Valley
5. Haystacks


PHOTO LOCATIONS


1. Lone Tree at Buttermere
2. Kelly Hall Tarn
3. Blae Tarn
4. Loughrigg Tarn
5. Pooley Bridge Boathouse
6. Tarn Hows


So the advice I'm looking for is if you had to drop ONE of the walks (we might not have enough time for everything) which one would it be?


Also does anyone have any parking advice for Loughrigg Tarn, I've had a look but it doesn't seem like there is any available.


Finally, have I missed any walks or photo locations that are an absolute must do for first time visitors? We have no maps nor navigation skills so we're going to be winging it to some degree but we're ok with that. I've found a few walks with proper text descriptions to follow for four of the five we have planned so we should be ok.


Thanks for your help as always guys.


Mes.
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