Author Topic: Do you have to sometimes motivate yourself to get out and about?  (Read 2240 times)

Jac

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In answer to the op YES - that's why I'm still pootling about on this flippin machine instead of striding out into the world --- gggrr
So many paths, so little time

ninthace

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After spending 3 weeks enjoying an antipodean summer and having now returned to a solid week of wind and rain, getting the motivation to go out in this weather is a problem, even the shopping trips require a major effort.
Solvitur Ambulando

BuzyG

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After spending 3 weeks enjoying an antipodean summer and having now returned to a solid week of wind and rain, getting the motivation to go out in this weather is a problem, even the shopping trips require a major effort.
Welcome back.  ;)

jontea

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My motivation is thinking back to my hospital bed and recovery last year, and making on while I'm fit and well.


I never know when my Crohnís Disease will return (its called a flare) or the side effects from the drugs I take (no jokes please)  ::)
So a flare would stop me in my tracks, it sounds really corny but I appreciate life so much more now, and try not to take hiking for granted, getting out there whenever I'm free  :)


Okay sick bowl at the ready  :buck2:



Walking is the worldís oldest exercise and todayís modern medicine.

http://johntrowsdale.blogspot.com/?m=1
Twitter; @JohnTrowsdale

Innominate Man

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My motivation is thinking back to my hospital bed and recovery last year, and making on while I'm fit and well.


I have an odd outlook (according to Mrs I) - in that what can be perceived as a negative, I will see as a positive.
JT's being a perfect example, where his condition could/should be seen as detrimental - compared to those folk without such a condition. But, JT turns that situation into a positive by seizing every opportunity and cherishes his adventure time, whereas others squander those moments because they don't have something to motivate them to get out & about.
And I appreciate it is easy to say this from the viewpoint of not having something such as Crohn's disease, but you have the advantage over the 'ditherers'.



Only a hill but all of life to me, up there between the sunset and the sea. 
Geoffrey Winthrop Young

jontea

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I appreciate it is easy to say this from the viewpoint of not having something such as Crohn's disease, but you have the advantage over the 'ditherers'.


Yes, I can see where you're coming from IM. It's like most things in life, its only when you think you might lose something or someone, you appreciate it or them more.  ;)
Walking is the worldís oldest exercise and todayís modern medicine.

http://johntrowsdale.blogspot.com/?m=1
Twitter; @JohnTrowsdale

Bigfoot_Mike

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Iíve had a number of different injuries and that can be an obstacle to getting started again. Iím easily managing 10,000 steps a day around the office and village, including lots of stairs. Going further afield is more of a concern, since I donít really know how to take things slowly and am probably not going to learn now.

BuzyG

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Iíve had a number of different injuries and that can be an obstacle to getting started again. Iím easily managing 10,000 steps a day around the office and village, including lots of stairs. Going further afield is more of a concern, since I donít really know how to take things slowly and am probably not going to learn now.


What type of injury?  I had a pulled muscle in my back that took 16 months to sort.  I never knew when it might go and like you struggled to gauge how hard I could push it.  Once I worked out the route cause of the pain. Which was actually in my groin not my back, I used to park as close as I could to the only mountain in these parts and walk straight up then back and fore in close proximity, never traveling more than A few miles from the car.  As soon as I felt the muscle start to fatigue, I headed straight down to the car. Boring at times, took a bit of disipline, but it was worth it.

Bigfoot_Mike

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What type of injury?  I had a pulled muscle in my back that took 16 months to sort.  I never knew when it might go and like you struggled to gauge how hard I could push it.  Once I worked out the route cause of the pain. Which was actually in my groin not my back, I used to park as close as I could to the only mountain in these parts and walk straight up then back and fore in close proximity, never traveling more than A few miles from the car.  As soon as I felt the muscle start to fatigue, I headed straight down to the car. Boring at times, took a bit of disipline, but it was worth it.


I had insertion tendonitis from trying too much too soon as I tried to build up my fitness.  This was followed by several months of severe back pain. I damaged some discs 25+ years ago and every so often they like to remind me that they are still there. Now my right knee has become painful. Again I have had knee pain in the past, but not for many years. I suspect that favouring an injured site is putting pressure elsewhere, which then triggers a different pain. I started last year with the intention of getting fit enough for an attempt on the Welsh 3000s later this year. This has now been postponed until 2020, as I havenít managed any serious walking since last June. I have been building up my distance during the working day at the office and taking in multiple flights of stairs every day, but this is slow going and boring. I want to be walking in the hills, but know I need to be careful that I donít trigger another setback.

BuzyG

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I had insertion tendonitis from trying too much too soon as I tried to build up my fitness.  This was followed by several months of severe back pain. I damaged some discs 25+ years ago and every so often they like to remind me that they are still there. Now my right knee has become painful. Again I have had knee pain in the past, but not for many years. I suspect that favouring an injured site is putting pressure elsewhere, which then triggers a different pain. I started last year with the intention of getting fit enough for an attempt on the Welsh 3000s later this year. This has now been postponed until 2020, as I havenít managed any serious walking since last June. I have been building up my distance during the working day at the office and taking in multiple flights of stairs every day, but this is slow going and boring. I want to be walking in the hills, but know I need to be careful that I donít trigger another setback.
I set my main goal for last year as the Scottish 4000s.  Had to cancel quit early on when I realised there was no way I could train hard enough , on, the injury, to get in shape.  Hoping to do that next year now.  Two years on and assuming something else doesn't go ping.

Keep at it and be sure to rest properly between training.  That was another lesson learned with this recent injury.  I can't simply train every day to get fit, like I did when I was young.  Need to rest properly between extended efforts. 

For sure you will get there.

Bigfoot_Mike

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I set my main goal for last year as the Scottish 4000s.  Had to cancel quit early on when I realised there was no way I could train hard enough , on, the injury, to get in shape.  Hoping to do that next year now.  Two years on and assuming something else doesn't go ping.

Keep at it and be sure to rest properly between training.  That was another lesson learned with this recent injury.  I can't simply train every day to get fit, like I did when I was young.  Need to rest properly between extended efforts. 

For sure you will get there.


I will keep at it. Like you, I need to learn how to pace my recovery and building up fitness. I think I will walk alone to start with. I had been walking after work with some colleagues mid-week as well as going out by myself at the weekend. One of them is super fit, cycling 20+ miles each way to and from work and running in ultra marathons, even though he is in his 50s. That training regime was obviously too much too soon.


All the best for your Scottish 4000s attempt. I live only a few miles from the Caingorms National Park, so most of them are on my door step.

richardh1905

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BuzyG and Bigfoot_Mike


Just a quick question - have you tried using walking poles?

BuzyG

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Not given poles much thought.  I enjoy having my hands free.  I am one of those who regularly adjusts my layers on the move.  Many of our walking group do use them.  I think mostly to protect knees.  One thing I have noted is that they are handy when rock hopping across streams.

forgotmyoldpassword

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Not given poles much thought.  I enjoy having my hands free.  I am one of those who regularly adjusts my layers on the move.  Many of our walking group do use them.  I think mostly to protect knees.  One thing I have noted is that they are handy when rock hopping across streams.


They're very good if you suffer with knee issues or balance from tight muscle groups.  I've used them (managed to snap a set, too, when poles arrested a fall which otherwise would have been pretty bad for me).  If you have a rucksack which can 'stow' them with some side compression strap that's even better.  A lot of mountaineers have also started to use reinforced aluminium poles for ascents due to the speed increases, too.  To adjust layers, just stick them in the ground and get on with your business to adjust layers.

Bigfoot_Mike

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BuzyG and Bigfoot_Mike


Just a quick question - have you tried using walking poles?


I bought some poles last year and found them a benefit. I just tried too much too soon and reactivated an old injury.