Author Topic: "Winterizing" my 3 season tents  (Read 1257 times)

Litehiker

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"Winterizing" my 3 season tents
« on: 18:50:55, 05/04/19 »
I have a tarp tent Moment DW and a TT Scarp 2, both with ripstop inner tents. Nice 3 season tents but I wanted them to endure winter conditions so I purchased the optional "Crossing Poles" foe both tents.


1. X-ing Poles are run under the flys for much better wind and snow load support.


2. Fly hem stake loops of light nylon webbing sewn to the flys at 4 locations around the tent (eliminates 90% of flapping in high winds)


3. Scarp 2 has heavier diameter and thicker walled custom main pole from Tentpole Technology.


4. prepared guy lines (attachment clips and line tensioners) for sides and ends Very fast attaching in a storm at "zero dark thirty".


So far in gusts to 65 mph. (105 kph?) and steady 35 mph winds these tents have been very solid when using all of the above aids.


** See photos and some instructions at the Backpacking Light website
-> For the Moment DW at "The Tarptent Thread" in the GEAR forum
-> For the SCARP 2 at the "Winterizing My SCARP 2" at the WINTER HIKING forum.


With both tents the Crossing Poles had to be shortened, generally around 5 inches (130 mm) using a small pipe cutter. Crush the waste tubing with pliers until it breaks apart so there is no messing around re-threading a shock cord.


Eric P.S. - Adding fly hem stake loops and making up prepared guy lines can be done for any tent and I highly recommend it.
« Last Edit: 19:12:29, 05/04/19 by Litehiker »

Bigfoot_Mike

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Re: "Winterizing" my 3 season tents
« Reply #1 on: 18:55:10, 05/04/19 »
65mph is more like 105kph

Litehiker

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Re: "Winterizing" my 3 season tents
« Reply #2 on: 19:11:26, 05/04/19 »
Thanks Mike,


I've corrected my wild guess. I'm "metrically challenged".  :)  (as are most Americans)


Eric B.

Rob Goes Walking

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Re: "Winterizing" my 3 season tents
« Reply #3 on: 20:30:29, 05/04/19 »
Thanks Mike,


I've corrected my wild guess. I'm "metrically challenged".  :)  (as are most Americans)


Eric B.


We use mph here for wind speed anyway, the UK uses an odd mix of metric and imperial. Most older people do imperial, most younger people do both.

ninthace

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Re: "Winterizing" my 3 season tents
« Reply #4 on: 21:47:44, 05/04/19 »

We use mph here for wind speed anyway, the UK uses an odd mix of metric and imperial. Most older people do imperial, most younger people do both.
  Real men measure windspeed in knots. 
Solvitur Ambulando

Bigfoot_Mike

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Re: "Winterizing" my 3 season tents
« Reply #5 on: 22:20:56, 05/04/19 »
Real Knots were used by men up to the mid 19th century - so pretty old now.

richardh1905

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Re: "Winterizing" my 3 season tents
« Reply #6 on: 22:36:12, 05/04/19 »
Interesting post, Eric, as I am doing some minor modifications to a tent that I bought off ebay last year.

The idea of extra fly hem loops for guying is a good one - a nice simple mod.

I'm also reinforcing the first 25cm of the pole sleeves, as I have managed to damage the sleeve netting by being a bit heavy handed when pitching the tent whilst under midge attack last year  :o 100mm (4") sash material works very well for this.

Other planned mods include putting a mesh panel in the inner door for added summer ventilation (closable for winter use), and I'm even considering getting some stronger alloy poles, as the ones supplied seem very thin for the size of the tent (3 man Coleman Phad 3).
« Last Edit: 23:02:36, 05/04/19 by richardh1905 »

ninthace

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Re: "Winterizing" my 3 season tents
« Reply #7 on: 23:05:48, 05/04/19 »
Real Knots were used by men up to the mid 19th century - so pretty old now.
Knots are still used in aviation.   Last time I flew a glider approach speed for landing was about 1.5 times stalling speed plus half windspeed, all in knots as airspeed indicator is in knots.
Maritime navigation also uses knots (nautical miles per hour) too.  Useful as 1 second of latitude is about 1 nautical mile.
Real men sail boats or fly gliders.  (Engines are for wimps)
My pet hate - people, usually journalist referring to knots per hour


Or did you mean knotty knots tied to logs?
Solvitur Ambulando

Rob Goes Walking

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Re: "Winterizing" my 3 season tents
« Reply #8 on: 23:12:51, 05/04/19 »
  Real men measure windspeed in knots.


I regard it as yet another metric that isn't metric that I have to convert to get a grasp of and wish everyone would just use metric.  :)  But I'm of generation snowflake, albeit the more robust end.

Bigfoot_Mike

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Re: "Winterizing" my 3 season tents
« Reply #9 on: 23:36:54, 05/04/19 »
Knots are still used in aviation.   Last time I flew a glider approach speed for landing was about 1.5 times stalling speed plus half windspeed, all in knots as airspeed indicator is in knots.
Maritime navigation also uses knots (nautical miles per hour) too.  Useful as 1 second of latitude is about 1 nautical mile.
Real men sail boats or fly gliders.  (Engines are for wimps)
My pet hate - people, usually journalist referring to knots per hour


Or did you mean knotty knots tied to logs?


Yes, I did mean the original knotty knots tied to a log that was thrown overboard to measure ship speed.  I assume that this was the origin of the name and of ship’s log (from logging the speed).


I thought real men walked  :)

ninthace

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Re: "Winterizing" my 3 season tents
« Reply #10 on: 00:31:08, 06/04/19 »

I thought real men walked  :)
I think real women do too.  She walks, I jog behind trying to keep up.
Solvitur Ambulando

BuzyG

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Re: "Winterizing" my 3 season tents
« Reply #11 on: 08:06:11, 06/04/19 »
I think real women do too.  She walks, I jog behind trying to keep up.

Have you calculated your jogging speed in knots, kph or mph?

And do you calculate how many Watts you are putting out climbing a hill?  Or should I that be horse power?

Engineers and units of measure.  Always good for a debate.

Oh and before I forget.  Can anyone define a kilogramme for me.  Do it quick, the definition changes in 44 days time.  ;)

Owen

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Re: "Winterizing" my 3 season tents
« Reply #12 on: 10:26:55, 06/04/19 »
A kilogramme is the weight of one litre of water as sea level. Always has been always will be.

Rob Goes Walking

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Re: "Winterizing" my 3 season tents
« Reply #13 on: 10:33:54, 06/04/19 »
A kilogramme is the weight of one litre of water as sea level. Always has been always will be.


I thought a kilogram was defined as the weight of Big K (although that may have started as the weight of water and probably did) and after a google it's apparently going to be redefined to be relative to the Planck constant as Big K slowly loses mass screwing up consistency with the measure.

Owen

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Re: "Winterizing" my 3 season tents
« Reply #14 on: 10:42:16, 06/04/19 »
I don't think they knew about Planck constant or Big K back in the seventeen hundreds.