Author Topic: Drinking From Streams Above The Last Fenceline  (Read 2672 times)


April

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Re: Drinking From Streams Above The Last Fenceline
« Reply #31 on: 13:33:48, 18/04/19 »
Actually I was repeating a famous quote

Oh, I see.

I think we must be on different wavelengths to each other ninthace.

I enjoyed the Friends videos, I'd forgotten how funny Ross was.

I'm wondering if we will be able to find running water high up on the fells this weekend, it has been so dry lately. I remember last summer we had to descend to get water a few times.
"Who would've thought...... you are light and darkness coming through" words by Tim Armstrong

ninthace

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Re: Drinking From Streams Above The Last Fenceline
« Reply #32 on: 14:57:48, 18/04/19 »
That can be a pain - I was surprised to hear it was dry at this time of year.  Round here it is still soggy so a lot of the cows are still in, much to Mrs N's relief.
Solvitur Ambulando

roughyed

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Re: Drinking From Streams Above The Last Fenceline
« Reply #33 on: 21:39:25, 18/04/19 »
With the current popularity of wild camping increasing the number of number 2's left in the hills, I personally would filter water.  Filters theses days are pretty cheap and lightweight, so there isn't the inconvenience associated anymore.


Owen

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Re: Drinking From Streams Above The Last Fenceline
« Reply #34 on: 08:14:47, 19/04/19 »
I don't know where you go camping but up here in Scotland apart from a few honeypots it's very unlikely anyone has camped there before. I'll go out of my way to avoid over used sites. But yes, if you're using a well used site filter your water.
Around bothies is another danger spot.

richardh1905

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Re: Drinking From Streams Above The Last Fenceline
« Reply #35 on: 19:48:05, 19/04/19 »
Around bothies is another danger spot.



Made me remember a hilarious description from 'Bothy Tales' by John Burns - he was holed up in Corrour Bothy with others during a snowstorm, and on the day that he left after the thaw had set in, he had to navigate what he described as a "fecal fairy ring". Yuk!
« Last Edit: 22:26:04, 19/04/19 by richardh1905 »

roughyed

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Re: Drinking From Streams Above The Last Fenceline
« Reply #36 on: 20:28:39, 20/04/19 »
I don't know where you go camping but up here in Scotland apart from a few honeypots it's very unlikely anyone has camped there before. I'll go out of my way to avoid over used sites. But yes, if you're using a well used site filter your water.
Around bothies is another danger spot.
True I'm more of a Peaks and lakes visitor, so the honey pots tend to be very popular. 

Doddy

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Re: Drinking From Streams Above The Last Fenceline
« Reply #37 on: 10:41:48, 21/04/19 »
I have the Sawyer Mini and use it home and abroad and use Aquaventure tabs if the water looks very doubtful.
It is not so much the risk of getting ill, but the risk of getting ill thousands of miles from home with resultant medical expenses, delay, cost of change of flights, etc. Why risk all that by not treating the water.
Coming across a dead sheep, or similar, higher up after sourcing water is not a myth. I have a come across a dead deer twice in streams in the Scottish Highlands.

However most gut incidents come from poor personal hygiene, pooping in the woods, not washing hands effectively afterwards and then eating.

madame cholet

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Re: Drinking From Streams Above The Last Fenceline
« Reply #38 on: 12:35:44, 21/04/19 »
Interesting thread just thinking might be a good buy for use anywhere save me taking a filter jug in the caravan at home or on holiday as well as camping ect my tap water at home stinks too. I've drunk out of many streams but something small and light would make extra sure.
Great things are done when women and mountains meet.

ninthace

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Re: Drinking From Streams Above The Last Fenceline
« Reply #39 on: 13:12:17, 21/04/19 »
A domestic water filter as a Brita filter used in a water jug is made from activated charcoal and an ion exchange resin.  The charcoal will reduce organic chemicals and chlorine to make the water taste better and the ion exchange resin will reduce heavy metals and soften the water.  Note the use of the word reduce, not remove.  The water flows over the surface of the particles in the filter, not through them so it will not remove everything.  Nor will it remove bugs or viruses which are small enough to pass through the particulate filter at the top of the cartridge.
As I understand it, a portable water filter for hiking is basically a fine mesh sieve capable of trapping bugs but unless it has an active carbon element it will not remove organic chemicals (chlorine is not an issue unless you are drinking out of a swimming pool). Similarly, unless there is an ion exchange resin it will not remove heavy metals. Viruses are much smaller than microbes but some filters claim to remove them too by virtue of their tendency to clump or stick to bits of matter.  Viruses can be destroyed by exposing the filtrate to UV light, by adding a chemical such as iodine or chlorine, or by boiling.
On balance, if I were in my caravan - I would stick to my Brita (other brands are available but the science is the same).
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alan de enfield

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Re: Drinking From Streams Above The Last Fenceline
« Reply #40 on: 15:19:24, 21/04/19 »
A domestic water filter as a Brita filter used in a water jug is made from activated charcoal and an ion exchange resin.  The charcoal will reduce organic chemicals and chlorine to make the water taste better and the ion exchange resin will reduce heavy metals and soften the water.  Note the use of the word reduce, not remove.  The water flows over the surface of the particles in the filter, not through them so it will not remove everything.  Nor will it remove bugs or viruses which are small enough to pass through the particulate filter at the top of the cartridge.
As I understand it, a portable water filter for hiking is basically a fine mesh sieve capable of trapping bugs but unless it has an active carbon element it will not remove organic chemicals (chlorine is not an issue unless you are drinking out of a swimming pool). Similarly, unless there is an ion exchange resin it will not remove heavy metals. Viruses are much smaller than microbes but some filters claim to remove them too by virtue of their tendency to clump or stick to bits of matter.  Viruses can be destroyed by exposing the filtrate to UV light, by adding a chemical such as iodine or chlorine, or by boiling.
On balance, if I were in my caravan - I would stick to my Brita (other brands are available but the science is the same).



I have added an in-line Activated Carbon Filter to my Sawyer and now get the best of both worlds.


* The MINI removes 99.99999% of all bacteria, such as salmonella, cholera and E.coli; removes 99.9999% of all protozoa, such as giardia and cryptosporidium...
 

 * High performance filter fits in the palm of your hand, weighs 2 ounces and filters up to 100,000 gallons (30 times more than comparable filters)Ö







 









« Last Edit: 15:23:37, 21/04/19 by alan de enfield »

ninthace

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Re: Drinking From Streams Above The Last Fenceline
« Reply #41 on: 15:37:01, 21/04/19 »
You will be fine with that set up provided you aren't downstream from an old mine  :) .
Does it cope with viruses?
What's the flow rate like?
Solvitur Ambulando

Rob Goes Walking

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Re: Drinking From Streams Above The Last Fenceline
« Reply #42 on: 15:56:05, 21/04/19 »
How does this compare to the Sawyer?

Owen

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Re: Drinking From Streams Above The Last Fenceline
« Reply #43 on: 16:24:49, 21/04/19 »
Just to add to this debate, did you know that every molecule of water on earth has at some stage in its life past through the gut of a dinosaur.

ninthace

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Re: Drinking From Streams Above The Last Fenceline
« Reply #44 on: 16:34:59, 21/04/19 »
Just to add to this debate, did you know that every molecule of water on earth has at some stage in its life past through the gut of a dinosaur.
Canít be true. Molecules of water are being created all the time. They are byproducts of metabolism and the combustion of hydrocarbons. They even arrive from space.
Solvitur Ambulando