Author Topic: Drinking From Streams Above The Last Fenceline  (Read 2166 times)

Mel

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Re: Drinking From Streams Above The Last Fenceline
« Reply #45 on: 17:32:03, 21/04/19 »
Surely tap water must have more pollutants and "purifying" chemicals in it than any babbling brook  :-\
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ninthace

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Re: Drinking From Streams Above The Last Fenceline
« Reply #46 on: 17:34:10, 21/04/19 »
Why?  Where do you think tap water comes from Mel?
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Mel

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Re: Drinking From Streams Above The Last Fenceline
« Reply #47 on: 17:41:27, 21/04/19 »
I'm meaning more the chemical process(es) our tap water goes through to make it "drinkable". 


Cut out the middle-man, filter a stream (dead sheep carcass optional  ;D  )



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alan de enfield

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Re: Drinking From Streams Above The Last Fenceline
« Reply #48 on: 17:47:39, 21/04/19 »
You will be fine with that set up provided you aren't downstream from an old mine  :) .
Does it cope with viruses?
What's the flow rate like?



Flow is 'fine' If I hang it up it gravity filters whilst I'm doing something else, or if you use the squeeze bag its a lot quicker.
If the water has a lot of particles (peat etc) then the filter can start to clog and slow down - back-flow it with some clean water and the filter is 'as good as new' again.


It filters down to 1 micron absolute (0.001mm)
Viruses are between 20 and 400 nanometeres (0.000002 - 0.0004 mm)
So I think the answer must be NO it doesn't cope with viruses


I don't think anything will filter that small and still allow water to pass with a sufficient flow to be of any use.

ninthace

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Re: Drinking From Streams Above The Last Fenceline
« Reply #49 on: 17:58:06, 21/04/19 »
I'm meaning more the chemical process(es) our tap water goes through to make it "drinkable". 


Cut out the middle-man, filter a stream (dead sheep carcass optional  ;D  )


'Fraid not.  Most of the purification process is filtration to remove the sheep poo, fish poo duck poo, fertilizers and pesticides that yon babbling brook picked up on its way to the reservoir.
Filtration does not add chemicals, it removes the bits and the organics.  The bugs and algae are killed by a variety of processes.  Aeration - adds air.   Ultraviolet light is also used - that is chemical free.  Ozonolysis is another method - that adds ozone but ozone is unstable breaking down to oxygen killing bugs in the process.  The other method is chlorination which will leave traces of chlorine in the water but keeps it fresh (an is a lot less Cl than your local pool).  They say the water in London has been drunk 3 times before but it still comes out tops in blind tastings.
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Mel

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Re: Drinking From Streams Above The Last Fenceline
« Reply #50 on: 18:01:14, 21/04/19 »
Sounds delicious... I knew there was a reason why I prefer wine  O0
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ninthace

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Re: Drinking From Streams Above The Last Fenceline
« Reply #51 on: 18:02:50, 21/04/19 »

I don't think anything will filter that small and still allow water to pass with a sufficient flow to be of any use.
  Sounds like a good system especially with the charcoal option.  I don't know of a decent reliable antiviral filter with a decent flow rate either - the only answer is to boil or treat.
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ninthace

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Re: Drinking From Streams Above The Last Fenceline
« Reply #52 on: 18:05:24, 21/04/19 »
Sounds delicious... I knew there was a reason why I prefer wine  O0
  And everybody knows alcohol kills germs!  Moreover, the ones it doesn't kill are too drunk to remember what they came for.  I'm with you.  Cheers!
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alan de enfield

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Re: Drinking From Streams Above The Last Fenceline
« Reply #53 on: 18:17:18, 21/04/19 »
  And everybody knows alcohol kills germs!  Moreover, the ones it doesn't kill are too drunk to remember what they came for.  I'm with you.  Cheers!



Quote

Notre Dame fire: Bees living in Cathedral survived after getting 'DRUNK' from smoke

https://www.express.co.uk/news/world/1116750/notre-dame-fire-latest-update-bees-survive-drunk

Gadabout Bounder

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Re: Drinking From Streams Above The Last Fenceline
« Reply #54 on: 20:27:39, 21/04/19 »



A hand pumped system.


90 seconds for 1 litre of water. Possibly less.


211grams.


I have a Katadyn Vario that will do 1 litre in about 30 seconds but is bulky and double the weight.



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jimbob

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Re: Drinking From Streams Above The Last Fenceline
« Reply #55 on: 21:17:30, 21/04/19 »
They say the water in London has been drunk 3 times before but it still comes out tops in blind tastings.
But, remember, they also say London water has been passed by the inspectors seven times.
Too little, too late, too bad......

Doddy

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Re: Drinking From Streams Above The Last Fenceline
« Reply #56 on: 11:17:30, 22/04/19 »
When time is mentioned i.e a few more minutes for a stove to boil, or a filter to work, I am amusingly reminded of Katz's comment in Bill Bryson's book- A Walk in the Woods about his trek on the Appalachian Trail.

Katz and Bill are joined at campfire by a fellow hiker who talks incessantly about gear; he talks long and hard about the value of the see through side panel on his pack and how much time it saves looking for items. Katz eventually says "As if we don't have the time on the trail to put a hand in a pocket to find stuff.


richardh1905

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Re: Drinking From Streams Above The Last Fenceline
« Reply #57 on: 13:23:57, 22/04/19 »
A great book, but a poor film.