Author Topic: pennine way  (Read 14282 times)

Slogger

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Re: pennine way
« Reply #15 on: 17:07:37, 18/02/13 »
Campingman,
Yeah sorry, I was replying to your post. Although I have been going as lightweight as possible for some years now (I'm 67 in April) as I do my trips in fewer days than the average time taken. I am thinking of having a change sometime and taking the more normal time over an LDP in which case i will probably go totally self sufficient. My usual load for the PW or C2C is around 25 to 30 lbs, so a self sufficient load would be about double that and would slow me down to a more normal itinary.

mikee

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Re: pennine way
« Reply #16 on: 13:43:54, 21/02/13 »
Hi camping man thanks for your reply really positive and  encouraging im not a seasoned walker and living in east anglia there are not many places to train climbing hills having said that I walked the coast to coast  last year and wild camped every night my pack at the start was 52lbs there were a few times along the walk i thought i was going to burn that rucksack when i got home but i was surprised how i got used to the weight and i really enjoyed the freedom of being able to stop where ever i wanted.


I did that walk with my two sons unfortunetly their ladies are not to keen on them going off again on a long distance walk  hence i will be doing this on my own with that in mind it was really encouraging getting your message and the advice if you could send the grid refrence for Davidsons lind that would be great

Alison333

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Re: pennine way
« Reply #17 on: 09:16:22, 22/02/13 »
Hi,


I'm doing the Pennine Way in March (south to north) staying in hostels etc - it's coming up soon.  Are the Harvey strip maps the best ones?  And is anyone else going to be out on the route too?


Cheers
Alison

Slogger

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Re: pennine way
« Reply #18 on: 16:39:40, 22/02/13 »
The best maps are the OS 1:25,000, but not really practicable. I have the Harvey strip maps and they are ok, but you have to have your eye to detail with them. The features are very small and can be missed with a quick look. I take a pair of map reading glasses which help a lot, +4 instead of my usual ones at +1.5


sussamb

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Re: pennine way
« Reply #19 on: 16:54:26, 22/02/13 »
Hi,


I'm doing the Pennine Way in March (south to north) staying in hostels etc - it's coming up soon.  Are the Harvey strip maps the best ones?  And is anyone else going to be out on the route too?


Cheers
Alison

I used my GPS to navigate last year, and had the Cicerone guide book with mapping as back up.  I have a gpx file suitable for a Garmin GPS, and others, should you be using one.  If you'd like a copy just PM me  O0
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Stottie

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Re: pennine way
« Reply #20 on: 19:52:48, 22/02/13 »
Hi,


I'm doing the Pennine Way in March (south to north) staying in hostels etc - it's coming up soon.  Are the Harvey strip maps the best ones?  And is anyone else going to be out on the route too?


Cheers
Alison

The Harvey maps are good, if you have no need to leave the route.  OS 1:50000 are adequate for a well-waymarked trail like PW, and they give you info on the country around the trail, which is really helpful if for any reason you want to take a detour. 

For instance, if you're struggling when you go northbound from Tan Hill, the Harvey map doesn't show you the oft-used unofficial bypass to upper Frumming Beck along the road and the farm track.  On the other hand, if you've got a tongue in your head you can ask for advice at the Inn.

Similarly, the Harvey map won't give you info about which eastbound escape route is best if you're in difficulties further north.  In that instance, a small scale map of northern England wouldn't be a bad thing to have tucked away in a waterproof bag.

Long ago, when the PW wasn't waymarked and 1:25000 maps were a rarity, everyone used 1:63360 (1 inch:1mile) which didn't have field boundaries and were often quite a few years out of date.  When we looked across Redesdale in 1963 we were amazed to see a valley filled with mature conifers (our maps were pre Second World War) but we pushed on with the help of our compass ( a device which to this day remains reliable after every battery has run flat).

I plan to follow in your footsteps a month later, and I hope you have a great time.

Alison333

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Re: pennine way
« Reply #21 on: 20:33:47, 23/02/13 »
Many thanks for the map advice.  I'll be using paper maps and compass, olde style.  I am looking forwards to the whole thing!

Calas Small Tiger Hunter

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Re: pennine way
« Reply #22 on: 02:28:00, 24/02/13 »
Have nice trips y'all hope the weathers fine for yas  8)
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Alison333

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Re: pennine way - walking poles?
« Reply #23 on: 10:19:41, 24/02/13 »
Also, are walking poles a good idea?  I have a pair, and when I use them locally, I don't seem to gain a lot from them, but local hills are very gentle midlands-type.

les+heidi

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Re: pennine way
« Reply #24 on: 10:45:05, 24/02/13 »
Im pro poles, they help on steep descents and power you up hills, especially so when hauling a decent pack. I use Pacer poles now and rate them highly.
Les

tonyk

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Re: pennine way
« Reply #25 on: 12:39:13, 24/02/13 »
Poles are useful if you know how to use them.They should be held loosely in the hand same as a cross country skier uses them.I have seen a lot of people holding them as if they were clubs and jabbing them into the ground.As Les says,they are good for powering up hills but also help with stabilty on all types of ground.
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forest view

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Re: pennine way
« Reply #26 on: 17:38:19, 24/02/13 »
Poles are a good piece of kit up here more as depth finders in the boggy bits. If any of our guests don`t have walking poles we offer them a pruning from our Hazel bushes to take over the Cheviot ridge.
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Stottie

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Re: pennine way
« Reply #27 on: 19:24:40, 24/02/13 »
You'll be glad of the poles.  Might take you a couple of days to get the hang of the technique as tonyk says, but after that you'll skip along.  Oh, and don't trip over them!

I first used them when getting over an injury, and now I use them if carrying my gear and/or taking a long day-hike across rough ground. 

Very handy for fending off aggressive dogs too.

Peter

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Re: pennine way
« Reply #28 on: 19:45:09, 24/02/13 »
If any of you are planning to use GPS with OS mapping, I have the entire north of England @1:25000 in one file.
Though how you would keep a GPS powered I don't know. Give me a shout if you want it. And good luck to you all!
 
Peter
sometimes I fall off the learning curve....
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sussamb

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Re: pennine way
« Reply #29 on: 20:03:57, 24/02/13 »
Kept my Etrex 20 powered during my 15 day PW walk last year.  Had 3 sets of rechargeables, each set lasted 3 to 4 days, though I recharged whenever I could.
Where there's a will ...