Author Topic: Pennine Way or Coast to Coast  (Read 11964 times)

Martin von Prague

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Pennine Way or Coast to Coast
« on: 07:51:09, 18/07/13 »
Which one is better?  :)  I'd like to visit the UK and do a long distance walk, but I still don't know which one to choose.

Ridge

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Re: Pennine Way or Coast to Coast
« Reply #1 on: 09:32:04, 18/07/13 »
I've not walked either end to end but I have done significant amounts of both of them. They are both great so whichever you choose you are in for a treat.
If this is going to be your first walking visit to the UK then I would want to include the Lake District so do the Coast to Coast this time and leave the Pennine Way for another visit.
Over hill, over dale. Thorough brush, thorough brier....
I do wander every where

C2C10

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Re: Pennine Way or Coast to Coast
« Reply #2 on: 11:09:38, 18/07/13 »
Both walks are good to walk, each offering excellent walking terrain and scenery. The Pennine Way is a bit longer at 270 miles, although some guidebooks say 250 miles, but 270 miles to be on the err side would be more realistic and probably need 15/ 21 days to complete. The Pennine Way tends to follow the terrain of the backbone of Northern England and can be tough going, although nowadays, it's not too bad unlike the late 60's and 1970's. Saying that the Pennine Way offers much more scenery and more interesting highlights such as the infamous crossing of Kinder Scout, Black Hill, the unique Pennine Way footbridge over the M62 motorway, Stoodley Pike, Withins Heights, Malham Cove, Pen-y-Ghent, the famous Pennine Way Cafe, Horton-in-Ribblesdale, Hardraw Force (England's highest single drop waterfall), Tan Hill Inn (England's highest pub @ 1732'), God's Bridge, High Force, Cauldron Snout, High Cup Nick, Cross Fell, Hadrian's Wall, The Cheviot (spur), crossing the Scottish Border and lastly having a well earned pint in the Border Hotel, Kirk Yetholm.   


The Coast to Coast is 190 miles and a very popular walk and can be easily walked in 2 weeks and the terrain is similar to the Pennine Way, but tends to be easy going at times especially to the east side of the walk. Coast to Coast can be good for meeting other Coast to Coaster's en route and this makes it a great social hub, a couple of pubs have a meet up point for Coast to Coast walkers to have a drink together.


The Coast to Coast does offer the Lakes District, Yorkshire Dales and North York Moors, which is a good mix for walking. The Coast to Coast like the Pennine Way does offer some good scenery and highlights are St. Bees cliff path, Haystacks (resting place of A.W), Grasmere (famous for the Gingerbread Man biscuit) Kidsty Pike (highest point on the Coast to Coast) Nine Standards Rigg, Kisdon Force, Richmond Castle, Cleveland Escarpment, Lion Inn, North Yorkshire Moors Steam Railway, Falling Foss and the famous Bay Hotel at Robin Hood's Bay.


A hard choice. But as Ridge says, do the Coast to Coast first and then the Pennine Way. Your choice in the end.






Martin von Prague

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Re: Pennine Way or Coast to Coast
« Reply #3 on: 11:39:37, 18/07/13 »
Thanks guys!

By the way, is it possible to wild camp on C2C? (I know it's not legal, but is it tolerated?) And are there any places where you can buy groceries (like bigger towns with Tesco or Sainsbury's)? I don't want to stay at B&Bs and eat in pubs too much (it's too comfortable, I like cooking my own food and sleeping in the tent :) ).

And what about the maps? Do I need to buy all the OS Explorer Maps for C2C, or is there a better option? (not sure what I'm looking for, maybe a guide book with maps?)

C2C10

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Re: Pennine Way or Coast to Coast
« Reply #4 on: 13:35:33, 18/07/13 »
Yes, it is possible to wild camp on Coast to Coast within reasonable means, such as seeking permission from the landowner, however, that is not always possible. The Lakes section will gives the best opportunity to wild camp, that is high above the intake wall, such places are on the cols, passes, ridges and tarns. As you progress to the Yorkshire Dales and Moors, wild camping opportunities becomes more difficult to find, but there are few places to find the odd sheltered spot out of the way of prying eyes. One area is a no-go for wild camping and that is the Vale of Mowbray, the section between Richmond and Ingleby Cross, that is almost agricultural land. However at that there is camping sites, which charge reasonable prices around about a fiver. In fact, the whole of the Coast to Coast walk does offer excellent campsites, so really no need to wild camp, but that is a personal option.


Tesco or Sainsburys, probably no. However, the major towns on the Coast to Coast are Kirkby Stephen and Richmond, offer the likes of Co-op and the odd independent grocery shop such as Spar, Nisa and Martin McColls. Other small towns/villages on the Coast to Coast are Cleator, Grasmere, Patterdale, Shap, Orton, Reeth, Swainby (off route) Glaisdale, Grosmont and Robin Hoods Bay. These offer the odd grocery shop, butchers and post office, who will sell you basic provisions like eggs, milk, bread and some offer a good range of groceries and other goodies. So, really there is no worry about getting your food or drink. The only thing, you need to know, is the section between Ingleby Cross and Grosmont does have no shop on that section (apart from Swainby, a little off-route at Huthwaite Green) But saying that, hopefully the Lord Stones Cafe will reopen in August and there is of cause the Lion Inn, which does offers excellent meals and beers.


Maps, well, believe me, a guidebook or a footprint strip map (west & east) would be more than ideal and a compass too. There are a few good guide books with maps included and when I did my first Coast to Coast walk in 1990, I used the Wainwrights, "A Coast to Coast Walk" guidebook and that was good enough to navigate with. There is a couple of tricky bits, such as Loft Beck, Greenup Edge, Boredale Hause, Nine Standards, which in misty conditions take some navigating. I think Martin Wainwright's Coast to Coast guidebook is a good one to carry. On my last three crossings, I used the footprint strip maps, which has plenty of detail. There is the Harvey's strip maps and these can be used with a gps. 

mow1701

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Re: Pennine Way or Coast to Coast
« Reply #5 on: 19:21:35, 18/07/13 »
Having done both its got to be the Pennine Way. It's a lot more wild than the c2c and you really feel a sense of distance and travel through different terrains. The c2c is not as impressive on the scenery front and not as wild- tea rooms and cafe in abundance hence it more the coaster to coaster walk. My view of the two, but definitely glad I've experienced them both.

C2C10

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Re: Pennine Way or Coast to Coast
« Reply #6 on: 21:26:00, 18/07/13 »
On the issue of wild camping, that the present heatwave is making the North York Moors into a tinderbox and therefore a great fire risk. There are national park rangers patrolling this area and there know of the well-known wild camp spots and will ask you to leave.


If, you need to camp, there is official camping at Osmotherley, Ingleby Cross, Beak Hills farm, Great Broughton, Chop Gate, Lion Inn, Grosmont, Goathland, Littlebeck and of cause Robin Hoods Bay.


Best to safe than sorry.

C2C10

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Re: Pennine Way or Coast to Coast
« Reply #7 on: 12:18:59, 19/07/13 »
Having done both its got to be the Pennine Way. It's a lot more wild than the c2c and you really feel a sense of distance and travel through different terrains. The c2c is not as impressive on the scenery front and not as wild- tea rooms and cafe in abundance hence it more the coaster to coaster walk. My view of the two, but definitely glad I've experienced them both.
:)

Slogger

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Re: Pennine Way or Coast to Coast
« Reply #8 on: 22:59:16, 19/07/13 »
The Coast to Coast for the most part is a very nice countryside walk, Ive done it in both directions. Ive also done the Pennine Way in both directions. If you want plenty of company then the C2c is the one. The PW is more remote and much more of a challenge but succeeding is more satisfying. There are upland sections in both that in adverse conditions can be challenging, but on the PW these are many whereas on the C2C these are few.
All in all if you want a pleasant long distance walk over about 12 days then its got to be the C2C. If it's a remote tough longer challenge over 16 to 21 days then go for the PW.

Martin von Prague

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Re: Pennine Way or Coast to Coast
« Reply #9 on: 21:07:20, 20/07/13 »
Thanks :)

And what about the West Highland Way in Scotland? Is it worth it?

Slogger

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Re: Pennine Way or Coast to Coast
« Reply #10 on: 14:56:03, 21/07/13 »
West Highland Way, we did it several years ago in a week. Not demanding as it mostly takes lower levels through the Glens, with just a couple of easy climbs to get over into the next glen etc. Can be busy, many wild camp, B&B get booked up early if starting at weekends but like many LDPs, are easier to access when starting mid week.
Lots of wide tracks to follow, however this if made up for by the beautiful scenery. Top it off with a walk up to the summit of Ben Nevis to finish.

urbanhymn01

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Re: Pennine Way or Coast to Coast
« Reply #11 on: 22:45:03, 22/07/13 »
Got to b P/W for me the whole walk is i found everyday a joy to walk did it in 12 days camped all the way from top of bleaklow to warland res and even a sheepfold near cauldron snout so yes P/W for me and thats y im doing it again next spring this time N/S

C2C10

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Re: Pennine Way or Coast to Coast
« Reply #12 on: 10:17:40, 23/07/13 »
Got to be P/W for me the whole walk is I found every day a joy to walk and did it in 12 days camped all the way from top of bleaklow to warland res and even a sheepfold near cauldron snout.
Interesting to hear you had took 12 days to do the Pennine Way. Was it a push to do. I would like to have a crack at walking the Pennine Way, but maybe in 17 days. O0

C2C10

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Re: Pennine Way or Coast to Coast
« Reply #13 on: 11:13:10, 23/07/13 »
Decided to back off this one and do it cycling instead. ::)

Martin von Prague

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Re: Pennine Way or Coast to Coast
« Reply #14 on: 21:32:02, 29/07/13 »
So, I think I will choose Coast to Coast :)