Author Topic: Bulls  (Read 4216 times)

korkecat64

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Bulls
« on: 13:27:06, 31/05/06 »
Hi everyone,

 i'm a bit of a novice and recently came across a bull obstructing my path on a right of way {not ideal} any advice apart from turning and running as there was no obvious way around it other than doing a u turn and hiking back where i had just come from.

Chris

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Re: Bulls
« Reply #1 on: 11:16:57, 02/06/06 »
If you are wearing a red jacket and steam is coming out of it's nostrels you are in big trouble. If it starts to charge, point and shout out "Behind you!". Then when it stops to look, run.

But seriously, I'm pretty sure it is illegal for a farmer to have a bull (or anything else dangerous) on a public right of way. If it spoils your day you have every right to report him.

Cows and bullocks on the other hand rarely pose any danger. If one of them does get a bit too friendly simply shouting and waving your arms should see it off, especially if you are carrying a pole. They are bred to respect humans.

korkecat64

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Re: Bulls
« Reply #2 on: 18:58:54, 21/06/06 »
Thanks Chris
my sense of humour deserted me at the time, but i'm happy to report it soon returned.

garytombom

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Re: Bulls
« Reply #3 on: 14:13:29, 03/11/06 »
Hi Korkie
if on a public right of way, bull can be there, if with cows.
I would advise dont get between bull and cows, you should be ok.
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Deerplay

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Re: Bulls
« Reply #4 on: 23:36:04, 03/11/06 »
Defra have rules on this and there is a list of breeds where the bulls are considered dangerous. Fresians (agressive breed) for example are not allowed in fields which are crossed by a public right of way, however Herefords (much more docile) are OK. I don't have any particular pointers for you to look at but I guess looking around the Defra website may help. I used to be quite nervous about bulls in fields but have never really had any problem with them. On the Daleasway this year I passed close to 3 bulls in fields (all Herefords with cows) with no problems. If you walk with a dog this tends to make things worse as the cows and bulls tend to chase the dog. If you walk with a dog and a bull shows too much interest let the dog go to run away rather than let the bull attack you and the dog.
« Last Edit: 23:43:49, 03/11/06 by Deerplay »
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walkinggirluk

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Re: Bulls
« Reply #5 on: 00:02:46, 04/11/06 »
Ok but what if the dog runs to the bull. I have a staff and these dog are bull frighting dogs. What should i do than still let the dog go. 
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Deerplay

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Re: Bulls
« Reply #6 on: 00:13:31, 04/11/06 »
I don't really know about what to do if the dog attacks the bull as my only experience is with dogs like Border Collies which normally run away. I wonder if anyone else out there knows about this.
The only thing we have to fear is fear itself

walkinggirluk

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Re: Bulls
« Reply #7 on: 00:19:41, 04/11/06 »
As my dog like sheep and i know if i let her of the lead she would go for the sheep and i know she do the same with the bulls she only try and play with it but the bull would not see it like that.
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Deerplay

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Re: Bulls
« Reply #8 on: 00:45:39, 04/11/06 »
Should really have thought about Staffordshire Bull Terriers. I used to live in South Staffordshire and recall that there were lots of place names such as "Bull Ring" "Bull Circus" and so on. I remember thinking about this at the time and what an unpleasant pastime it must have been for the bulls and dogs. I'm glad it's stopped. Trouble is that you can't easily change the instinct of dogs bred for that sort of thing. I suppose one option is to leave the dog at home if you are in doubt. I have a Border Collie and have to leave her at home as she is now 16 and incapable of walking more than 100 yards due to her advanced age.
The only thing we have to fear is fear itself

walkinggirluk

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Re: Bulls
« Reply #9 on: 22:59:28, 04/11/06 »
Well my dog dog still young and very active but like i said i got to leave her on the lead and this is a problem when i take her out this is why i  asked like. You said these dog have breed in this way. She is the sofftest dog you'll ever meet. but when it cames down to other animals she different not aggressive she very playful i tink she dose understand that but cheers deerplay. 
« Last Edit: 23:01:06, 04/11/06 by walkinggirluk »
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Deerplay

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Re: Bulls
« Reply #10 on: 00:05:32, 05/11/06 »
Just to clear up any misunderstanding..... I wasn't in any way suggesting your dog was aggressive but just trying to point out that with breeding and so on a bull terrier might go toward bulls rather than away. My Border Collie was similarly attracted to sheep but runs away from cows even though she's never been trained. I think that years of conditioning cause this and it's difficult to uncondition. I've encountered lts of Staffs that are soft as a brush generally but still have that instinct going on.
The only thing we have to fear is fear itself

walkinggirluk

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Re: Bulls
« Reply #11 on: 23:53:44, 05/11/06 »
I agree these dogs have been breed this way
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howardfernlover

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Re: Bulls
« Reply #12 on: 21:36:48, 12/11/06 »
There may be laws that say whether bulls can be in areas with footpaths, and whether they're with cows or whatever, but like a great many laws there's no-one to enforce them. In some of the remote parts of Wales I've walked in, no farmer is going to keep his bull off a prime bit of grass just on the slender chance one person like me might pass by, once in a blue moon. Personally, I keep well clear of ANY cattle, whatever sex they are; they are much bigger than me and I simply don't trust them.  I either go round by the adjoining fields or, where there are no fences or hedgerows, I make a very big detour, downwind of them if possible.