Author Topic: Every winter picture tells a story  (Read 13921 times)

midweekmountain

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Re: Every winter picture tells a story
« Reply #75 on: 14:05:05, 20/02/16 »


The infamous Aig Goloritz on Sardinia


"The Goloritz pinnacle is not the place to be in an electric storm. All of a sudden whoosh lightning hit the top of the spire 30 metres from me, I could not reverse and decided to go onward to the lower off very close to where the lightning struck it was easy climbing but I was to put it bluntly (s)hitting myself"




Aig Goloritz from the clifftop footpath.


Several years ago I was lucky enough to do ‘Sole Incantatrare’ a 6/7 pitch 3*** 6c on the Aig Goloritz in Sardinia.



It starts with a 6k walk down to the sea and finishes with a strenuous walk back up that route.



To this date I still think it is the best bolted euro route I have ever done in probably the best location I have ever climbed in.

So when we planned to visit the island again it was only natural that another route on the Goloritz pinnacle would be on the agenda.

I teamed up with Alan Walmsley, after a couple of days warm up we decided to go for the main event, the route we had chosen was called ‘Sinfonia del Mulini a Vento’ an 8 pitch 3*** 6a,6a,5b,6a+,6b,5a,6b+6a. The big difference was that on this route the bolts had been chopped. Now it has to be done on traditional gear accordingly the Rockfax guide graded it E2 5c.

Any route on the tower is a big day out and very popular so to ensure we were there first we got up at 05.00 only to find it was raining heavily, we made a decision to go, have a look, after we had driving 1hr it was still raining  so we reluctantly turned back.

The 5 o’clock start was repeated the next morning this time it was dry so after the 6km walk in we found ourselves starting the first pitch around 8 o’clock. The intro pitch was given 6a, very polished, very tricky, we used nuts to back up some old in situ pegs. The second pitch was another 6a, Alan led this again it was awkward, the tell tale slings on pegs made it obvious that many people aid this pitch. The 3rd pitch was easier & led to an off width chimney (4th pitch) this is one of the crux’s graded 6a+ and had very little gear on it apart from a couple of pegs after the main difficulties, a very bold pitch.

On the belay at the top of the chimney the heavens opened leaving me with a soaking wet 6b pitch, this was duly aided, on pegs and nuts, it took us onto a traverse line back to the centre of the main face.

Once on the main face we could see the extent of the massive storm and heavy rain just to the north luckily we were just on the southern edge of it, the wind seemed to be keeping it away from us.

I was now faced with climbing the crux 6b+ pitch on wet rock, luckily it was a crack that took nuts to back up the in situ pegs, during this pitch the weather deteriated. It started thundering. The Goloritz pinnacle is not the place to be in an electric storm, I brought Alan up, it was looking very menacing now, Should we turn back, we were so close with only one 6a pitch to do so I set off at a rate of knots. Half way up the pitch Alan shouted up that the storm had changed direction and was now coming towards us, it was raining on us now but 2 hundred yards away we could see the rain was torrential.

All of a sudden whoosh lightning hit the top of the spire 30 metres from me, I could not reverse and decided to go onward to the lower off very close to where the lightning struck it was easy climbing but I was to put it bluntly (s)hitting myself.

I got to the lower off tried one of the 2 ropes through and gratefully lowered off, I was a bit shaken so Alan took the lead on the abseil, with 2 massive 60 metre raps we were down on the ground to great relief.



Big thanks to Alan for keeping cool in difficult situations.......

Rhino

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Re: Every winter picture tells a story
« Reply #76 on: 09:46:46, 22/02/16 »
Proper climbing that MWM  O0  i bet you had a few beers after that shake up  ;D
Wainwrights Completed 12/12/15

April

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Re: Every winter picture tells a story
« Reply #77 on: 21:16:45, 22/02/16 »
Great stuff MWM, pleased you lived to tell the tale  :)

It looks a lot bigger than Napes Needle  :)
"Who would've thought...... you are light and darkness coming through" words by Tim Armstrong

midweekmountain

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Re: Every winter picture tells a story
« Reply #78 on: 13:16:46, 25/02/16 »
Proper climbing that MWM  i bet you had a few beers after that shake up

And a day resting.

Great stuff MWM, pleased you lived to tell the tale

It looks a lot bigger than Napes Needle

Yes was defo a passenger on the trip back to the floor, Alan set up all the raps, checked everything was right then sent me down, never been more pleased to get onto the horizontal.

midweekmountain

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Re: Every winter picture tells a story
« Reply #79 on: 08:57:18, 26/02/16 »



We have been having some superb weather this winter BUT very very very occasionally we are treated to a dank wet windy weekend all over the UK.

So what to do on a rare wet winter weekend.


The Flying Scotsman has been making the news recently, we saw a story on TV saying it was  being painted in a green Livery so we decided to go for a walk round the workshops.

Looking forward to some walks based on seeing the Flying Scotsman in action later this year.






And its free..........

midweekmountain

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Re: Every winter picture tells a story
« Reply #80 on: 11:18:52, 28/02/16 »


Baby seal posing for the camera



Looking at the forecast it looked foul in the hills so once again we headed for the coast, thought we would go and see if the seals were at Ravenscar.


Tide looks fine and off we go, love the seals, maybe 50 seals stranded on the beach, they seem to be oblivious to you as you walk amidst them and pose nicely for photos.

We continue the walk along the tidal beach to Robin Hoods Bay, after the heavy rain the cliffs seem very unstable with the constant rumble of mini avalanches.



It seemed prudent to keep as far away fram the cliffs as possible.



Anyhow looking back at the foul weather reports on here over the weekend it looked like we made the right decision, even April/Beefy abandoned the hills  and went for a walk round Newcastle.








Tidal zone scenery





Hardly a cloud in sight on this side of the country

Innominate Man

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Re: Every winter picture tells a story
« Reply #81 on: 22:43:22, 28/02/16 »
Great photos.
Last Saturday (20/02/16) we strolled along the upper section of the Cinder Track from Robin Hoods Bay to Whitby. It was a bit 'clarty' then but at least it didn't rain (despite the forecast that it would). We didn't have long so it was a short excursion of just under 9 miles, but brisk walking in the strong breeze and good to give our legs a stretch.
Managed a similar short walk on Wednesday (day off work) at Bolton Abbey and the area around there. That was a sunny & quiet day, although slightly annoyed by a pair of cyclists using a path that was clearly marked as prohibited to them !
Only a hill but all of life to me, up there between the sunset and the sea. 
Geoffrey Winthrop Young

midweekmountain

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Re: Every winter picture tells a story
« Reply #82 on: 12:07:48, 01/03/16 »
we strolled along the upper section of the Cinder Track from Robin Hoods Bay to Whitby.

I think the NE coast is magic, my fave walk there is from Ravenscar drop straight down to the sea thro the hotel golf course and follow the beach to RBH, then continue north along the Cleveland way till you get to Hawsker then return to RBH by cinder track,
Then drop down to RBH and follow Cleveland Way south back to Ravenscar.

Another brill walk around there is Staithes to Runswick bay along the bottom of the cliffs, you can then return back along top of cliffs OR make a circuit detouring inland OR Go onto Sandsend/whitby as a linear walk.

You get some stunning views but have to get the tide right for both of these.

although slightly annoyed by a pair of cyclists using a path that was clearly marked as prohibited to them !

As a 'sometimes' cyclist, I get slightly embarrased by the antics of mountain bikers, I have found the worst place for this is the Peak District close to Sheffield.

They do not seem to give a toss in that area.

midweekmountain

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Re: Every winter picture tells a story
« Reply #83 on: 13:53:18, 01/03/16 »



The Grey Mares Tail of Moffat

We had a couple of brill days winter mountaineering in Glencoe,  on the third morning we woke up at the usual 5pm to find it pouring down with rain.

Over breakfast we talk things over,  the weather forecast looks better darn sarf we pack up and off, the rain stopped before Glasgow and by the time we got to the Moffat turn off there was enough blue sky to patch a sailors trousers more importantly the car thermometer had dropped to below zero.

TIP..... Moffat is about 2 miles off the M74 a few miles beyond is a very little known walking area very reminiscent of the Lake District, there are several cracking Corbetts hereabouts AND its often dry here if/when you get rained or snowed off further north, the Moffat hills have saved many a rainy day.

Today we pass on the summits and walk straight up to the bottom of the very frozen waterfall the Grey Mares Tail. Graded III*** approx 150 metres high and provides great sport.

We finish high on the steep hillside, walk up to the main path, by now out of the steep gorge we are basking in weak sunshine, eat our lunch and walk back to base, this little number had been on my to do list for a lot of years.





Easy climbing on the upper section, BUT it would be very easy to end up IN the waterfall here.

rural roamer

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Re: Every winter picture tells a story
« Reply #84 on: 18:10:23, 01/03/16 »
Great to see your pics of Sardinia. We had a wonderful holiday there at the end of September, a combination of walking and sightseeing. The walking being much better in our first week in the east rather than the 2nd week in the west. We found a lack of marked trails and decent maps as is often the case somewhere like Sardinia.  We often came across lots of trails but there was only one or none on the map and often ended up at a fence blocking the path, so difficult to plan our own route. Where did you stay? The view looks very like the view we had from our apartment terrace in Baunei.


We walked down to Cala Goloritze, fortunately making an early start as its very popular with tourists. We spent an hour there but passed lots of people heading down when we were going back up, many ill prepared and walking in flip flops and with no water! Did they think there was a cafe there? Some asked how much further, I really wondered if some would make it back up! We also walked to the Gorropu gorge and as far as we could into it without any climbing skills.  That too was fairly busy.  The only walk we didn't encounter anyone was near the Su Marmuri caves at Ulassai, We visited the caves while there, well worth a visit, though there were only a few tours a day then and about 30 people on it, us being the only English so the tour was only in Italian or German unfortunately.

Great memories, lovely island!

midweekmountain

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Re: Every winter picture tells a story
« Reply #85 on: 20:48:00, 01/03/16 »
Great to see your pics of Sardinia. We had a wonderful holiday there at the end of September, a combination of walking and sightseeing. The walking being much better in our first week in the east rather than the 2nd week in the west. We found a lack of marked trails and decent maps as is often the case somewhere like Sardinia.  We often came across lots of trails but there was only one or none on the map and often ended up at a fence blocking the path, so difficult to plan our own route. Where did you stay? The view looks very like the view we had from our apartment terrace in Baunei.


We walked down to Cala Goloritze, fortunately making an early start as its very popular with tourists. We spent an hour there but passed lots of people heading down when we were going back up, many ill prepared and walking in flip flops and with no water! Did they think there was a cafe there? Some asked how much further, I really wondered if some would make it back up! We also walked to the Gorropu gorge and as far as we could into it without any climbing skills.  That too was fairly busy.  The only walk we didn't encounter anyone was near the Su Marmuri caves at Ulassai, We visited the caves while there, well worth a visit, though there were only a few tours a day then and about 30 people on it, us being the only English so the tour was only in Italian or German unfortunately.

Great memories, lovely island!



Hi One of my mates has bought an apartment nr Barisardu, just North of Baunei it's a superb base and he is very keen on exploring the island.

Yes its difficult to get maps and info for outdoor activities on Sardinia.

We used the Sardinia: Rother Walking Guide by Walter Iwersen and Elisabeth van de Wetering and a Lonely Planet guide
Found a download of a cycling map on a GPS seems to be the best available, a friend who runs an outdoor guiding business on the island put us onto it.

Think Sardinia does not give up its secrets easily but its well worth the effort to get to know it, its a fantastic island. As we went in Jan/Feb we did not see anyone else on the walks but the weather was as warm as the uk in summer.

My mate is also into sea canoeing so I had a day out with him, round the Pedra Longa area from Santa Maria Navarrese the coastal bit near your base Baunei. As usual I ended up in the sea and it was pleasantly warm in January.

Am looking forward to some more trips to Sardinia.
« Last Edit: 08:18:59, 02/03/16 by midweekmountain »

Innominate Man

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Re: Every winter picture tells a story
« Reply #86 on: 00:01:32, 02/03/16 »



The Grey Mares Tail of Moffat

We had a couple of brill days winter mountaineering in Glencoe,  on the third morning we woke up at the usual 5pm to find it pouring down with rain.

Over breakfast we talk things over,  the weather forecast looks better darn sarf we pack up and off, the rain stopped before Glasgow and by the time we got to the Moffat turn off there was enough blue sky to patch a sailors trousers more importantly the car thermometer had dropped to below zero.

TIP..... Moffat is about 2 miles off the M74 a few miles beyond is a very little known walking area very reminiscent of the Lake District, there are several cracking Corbetts hereabouts AND its often dry here if/when you get rained or snowed off further north, the Moffat hills have saved many a rainy day.

Today we pass on the summits and walk straight up to the bottom of the very frozen waterfall the Grey Mares Tail. Graded III*** approx 150 metres high and provides great sport.

We finish high on the steep hillside, walk up to the main path, by now out of the steep gorge we are basking in weak sunshine, eat our lunch and walk back to base, this little number had been on my to do list for a lot of years.





Easy climbing on the upper section, BUT it would be very easy to end up IN the waterfall here.
That looks my ideal day - thanks for bringing it to my/our attention. It is now highly placed on my 'to do' list.
Was that a recent trip MWM ?
Only a hill but all of life to me, up there between the sunset and the sea. 
Geoffrey Winthrop Young

midweekmountain

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Re: Every winter picture tells a story
« Reply #87 on: 15:25:20, 03/03/16 »
That looks my ideal day - thanks for bringing it to my/our attention. It is now highly placed on my 'to do' list.
Was that a recent trip MWM ?



Glad to be of help,  It has to be really cold snap for the Grey Mares Tail (GMT) to freeze up, these photos would have been taken 4/5 years ago.





Another good icefall like GMT is Cautley Spout in the Howgills, its very similar, no photos of it but as usual there was a story about the first time we did it.



One of my climbing partners at the time was John Ruaridh Grant Mackenzie, 5th Earl of Cromartie,  Chief of Clan Mackenzie, a very keen climber, prolific new router and plain John to us.

Anyhow I get a phone call from John one saturday night saying he had just done the first ascent of an amazing waterfall in the Howgills, Cautley Spout. Buzzin, he gave us directions, so I rang round some mates and we went and did it on the Sunday.

Unknown to us John had contacted the guide book writers and claimed a first ascent also naming us as doing the second ascent.

We soon found out that Cautley spout had been the best kept secret of the local South Lakes climbers who had purposly kept the description out of the guidebooks so morons like us never found it.

I caused quite a stir, our name was mud folks were writting letters to the climbing mags for months after, of course once the secret was out it got written up in the guides and now everyone knows about it.
« Last Edit: 10:59:08, 04/03/16 by midweekmountain »

midweekmountain

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Re: Every winter picture tells a story
« Reply #88 on: 09:21:38, 05/03/16 »
I have a bit of a problem as my photos drop off this site after a period approx 10 weeks.
I actually posted a question about this and nobody seemed to be able to help.

http://www.walkingforum.co.uk/index.php?topic=30144.msg438061#msg438061

Here is the question again if anyone new on here can help me.

Just noticed photos are starting to drop of this thread so it feels like its time to close it down.

Thanks for the support and feedback guys.