Author Topic: Every walking photo tells a story  (Read 39089 times)

midweekmountain

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Re: Every walking photo tells a story
« Reply #195 on: 12:19:46, 15/07/16 »





On a different tack......................




This is one of my fave huts in the Lakes, we spend a lot of time here for several reasons, one is Location, Location, Location. Its only 300 metres from the New Dungeon Gill which means you have walking/scrambling /climbing straight out the hut door.


I was up there earlier this year with my walking group who had opted for camping on the Langdale National Trust campsite...........................the fools.



Unfortunately it was a wet weekend and they were having a miserable time, wet from walking going back to a wet tent on a squalid camp site so I invited them over for tea to warm up round the fire and use our drying room.


I just love the expression on peoples faces when I take them into the huts, its like one of those eureka moments when the penny drops.


Why are we paying a fortune to grub around in tents in the rain on a squalid camp site while your lording it over here for 3.00 (Three pounds) per night.


Although this hut has modern faciliites it has a very traditional feel about it, it has a superb library and its decorated with old traditional mountaineering regalia. Another reason I like it is because it makes a superb backdrop for doing still life photography.





A lovely warm welcoming fire






This hut is a great photo location stuffed with great still life props.

Innominate Man

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Re: Every walking photo tells a story
« Reply #196 on: 13:23:17, 15/07/16 »
I hope you moved your boots before they got too hot !
I saw the photo and your opening comment (before realising there was a write up below it):- and I thought it was the hut down Langdale.
I remember quite a few years ago leaving early in the morning to nip up Jacks Rake to catch the early light and as I drove past the hut there was a guy just coming out of the front door with a mug of something in his hand. I could see the expression on his face as he saw my car and looked at me driving - as if to say 'how come you're up so early ?'
I guessed he thought that he would be the first up and about.


It was also quite funny when I'd finished and was coming down and already passed the tarn when I could see two people coming up the path towards me. We stopped to chat and they asked where I was going and what was I intending doing. When I said I'd done it and was on my way down they weren't sure if I was having them on or not.
They were early birds who had just driven over from Little Langdale and thought they'd be the first on the hill.
It was one of those days when you feel really blessed when you steal a few hours just to yourself and it makes the early start more than worth it.
We are so lucky to have all this wonderful landscape all around us.
Only a hill but all of life to me, up there between the sunset and the sea. 
Geoffrey Winthrop Young

Jac

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Re: Every walking photo tells a story
« Reply #197 on: 18:45:44, 15/07/16 »
I want to move in - immediately  :)
So many paths, so little time

midweekmountain

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Re: Every walking photo tells a story
« Reply #198 on: 08:39:40, 16/07/16 »
I remember quite a few years ago leaving early in the morning to nip up Jacks Rake to catch the early light and as I drove past the hut there was a guy just coming out of the front door with a mug of something in his hand. I could see the expression on his face as he saw my car and looked at me driving - as if to say 'how come you're up so early ?'
I guessed he thought that he would be the first up and about.

I suspect you are thinking of the Achille Ratti It belongs to a Catholic society club, its about 50 yds from the hut in the photo and yes we are lucky to have these places on hand they are superb facilities.

I want to move in - immediately

Yes indeed we were there for a few days earlier this week its magic!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Innominate Man

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Re: Every walking photo tells a story
« Reply #199 on: 00:05:34, 17/07/16 »
I want to move in - immediately  :)
That's a bit rash Jac, you could have had a short period of courtship, perhaps a small engagement of several weeks, you know - just to stop the tongues wagging   :D
Only a hill but all of life to me, up there between the sunset and the sea. 
Geoffrey Winthrop Young

midweekmountain

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Re: Every walking photo tells a story
« Reply #200 on: 09:11:20, 17/07/16 »
Another selling point is its own private swimming pool!!!!!!!!!!!!

BUT

We went up last week cos its gonna be shut for a couple of weeks while a new septic tank is installed...........

midweekmountain

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Re: Every walking photo tells a story
« Reply #201 on: 09:36:26, 17/07/16 »




Another change of subject, we visited the Coniston area a couple of days ago and pulled into Yew Tree Tarn en route.

Found some superb water lilies could not resist taking a quick snap................

PeakRambler

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Re: Every walking photo tells a story
« Reply #202 on: 11:53:48, 17/07/16 »
YES



My son when he quickly mastered to balance his kayak against the downforce of the Afon Tryweryn, Bala

midweekmountain

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Re: Every walking photo tells a story
« Reply #203 on: 11:33:53, 20/07/16 »
Yes canoeing is a sport that has made leaps and bounds over the last few decades.


I can remember bumping into Galen Rowell in the Karakoram in Pakistan. He was telling me about an exped he had organised on the Braldu within minutes of launching the canoes 2  of the worlds top paddlers had been drowned, the trip abandoned. Fast forward to the noughties and my mates are booking up to go on commercial canoing holidays to the same place........unreal!!!!!!!!!!


I think its due to the artificial  canoe runs like Holme Pierpoint and the Tees Barrier where the youngsters can develop superb skills in a safe environment right from starting the sport.

midweekmountain

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Re: Every walking photo tells a story
« Reply #204 on: 13:26:14, 20/07/16 »



A born showman


Have been meaning to visit Appleby Horse Fair for years, it's a fascinating event to experience.


Nowadays its more an excuse to gather than trade horses, and gather they do. Somewhere around 15,000 gypsies and/or travelers descend on Appleby. They were camped along the highways by the hundreds, their horses tied or pinned up, their ornately decorated wagons intermingled with modern camper trailers.

To top it all off, another 30,000 or so of their closest friends and spectators like us added to the mix, CHAOS, in the 'best possible taste'.

The first thing we noticed was a heavy RSPCA and Police presence I would hate to have been paying the overtime bill, 'ang on a minute we are!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

As we got closer you could hear horseshoes clacking on tarmac as the guys and gals used the mainstreet as an impromtu harnessed 'sulky' racetrack.

We made a mistake of cutting thro a ginnel, interupting a deal, 20's unrolled from a huge wedge, we got sly menacing looks.

At 10.00 in the morning the guys had been breakfasting on Carlsberg special brew, that 9% stuff that tastes like parrafin, now at 12.00 it was starting to take effect and some of those sulky dragsters were getting reckless.

The mood was changing fast 1t was kicking off, time to go................





Some superb riding skills





This really does look like good fun






From the horses mouth




« Last Edit: 18:46:50, 20/07/16 by midweekmountain »

Mel

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Re: Every walking photo tells a story
« Reply #205 on: 19:30:37, 20/07/16 »
Sorry but the skewbald horse in the second pic looks terrified and out of it's depth.  The bridles, bits and halters are in poor condition, poorly fitted and rusty.  The final pic clearly shows the horse wanting to be anywhere but near it's handler.
 
There's a reason for the high RSPCA and Police presence at the Appleby Horse Fair.
 
I find these pictures distressing  :(
No expense spared in pursuit of a bargain ;)
https://snailspacewalks.blogspot.co.uk/

midweekmountain

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Re: Every walking photo tells a story
« Reply #206 on: 20:19:59, 20/07/16 »
Sorry but the skewbald horse in the second pic looks terrified and out of it's depth.  The bridles, bits and halters are in poor condition, poorly fitted and rusty. The final pic clearly shows the horse wanting to be anywhere but near it's handler.
 


I would be the first to admit I know nothing about horses or tack, as we took these photos we were stood amongst several RSPCA officers who are supposed to be familiar with equine care. We put our trust in these guy's and drop coins in their box's, they got at least as good a view as us yet seemed quite happy with the procedures.


To a layman like myself all the animals I saw looked healthy BUT as I say I know nuthin.............


There's a reason for the high RSPCA and Police presence at the Appleby Horse Fair.
 


There certainly is, when we got home and heard the local news it had kicked off, a lot of trouble and arrests later in the evening........................

Innominate Man

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Re: Every walking photo tells a story
« Reply #207 on: 20:38:34, 20/07/16 »
I think your timely retreat was a good idea. I'm not sure the guy in the dark jacket (last photo) is looking askance at you or as a reaction to the guy with the pony. Either way he looks a little uneasy.
Did you capture these photos as quick shots or did you ask for permission to take their photos ?
Some people can be very touchy about having a photo taken  :knuppel2:
Interesting shots all the same.


On the Friday - 3rd June we stopped off at Kirkby Stephen on the way to the Lakes and the town was very busy with people congregating. It was even busier on the '66' returning on Sunday evening - plenty of 'action' and not just a little glad to get clear of it.
Only a hill but all of life to me, up there between the sunset and the sea. 
Geoffrey Winthrop Young

midweekmountain

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Re: Every walking photo tells a story
« Reply #208 on: 08:06:00, 21/07/16 »
The showman and the girls were posing for the cameras, the horse trader picture was a snap tele shot from a long distance its also been cropped, the reason for the black and white's is because there is a lot of bright orange safety barriers lining the road that dominated the color versions.


I don't think people were to bothered about photos several film crews about 'n' every man and his firkin had cameras, whether they be DSLR's, compact's, phones or vids.

midweekmountain

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Re: Every walking photo tells a story
« Reply #209 on: 13:50:15, 21/07/16 »




East Ridge of Stickle Pike marked on the left Jacks Rake to the right


I love being able to walk out of the back door of my accomodation straight onto the hill.....

So today we are going to do the Picco Harrison Integrale.

Starting from the road you get 1400ft of scrambling to the summit of Harrison Stickle, the highest point of the Langdales. Without hardly any descent en route.
A good contender for the best mountaineering day out in the Lakes!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Fron the hut we approach the Langdale pikes via Lower Scout Crag very popular with outdoor school groups and today is no exception. Scramble up the descent route then up to Upper Scout Crag where the join the approach to the South Ridge of White Gill Crag a long grade 2 ** scramble.


We top out and contour round the head of White Ghyll,  hearing voices we spy a couple of climbers below us on Route 1, a severe in White Ghyll crag, ironically the route we did on out last visit here.


Onward we traverse across to the crowds at Stickle Tarn to join the main stoned moterway up to Harrison Stickle for a couple of hundred metres. The East Ridge of Harrison Stickle now towers above us, in many ways its the mirror image of Jacks rake BUT its slightly harder and much quieter, across the way we can see the ants crawling all over Pavey Ark where we get our route to ourselves.


At a cairn we hanger Left and skirt the toe of the buttress falling from the summit.
Our route follows a series of grassy ramps until we are forced onto a rock ridge completely covered in rough volcanic nodules. This pleasant section with superb friction curves up to  a grassy rake below a steep wall split by a left facing slanting gangway (the crux).


All to soon we reach the summit, our original intention was to go over to do the West Ridge of Pike o'stickle a grade 3** route but the weather is threatening so we cut our losses.


I hate the stoned footpath down to Stickle Tarn, in fact I hate most stoned paths, so we traverse across to Pavey Ark and descend Jacks Rake, late in the day with imminent



Once again Langdale provides another great sporting day out!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!





The initial wall starting the East Ridge of White Ghyll Crag





Climbers visable on the Left in White Ghyll





High on East Ridge of Harrison Stickle