Author Topic: Flora  (Read 44168 times)

richardh1905

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Re: Flora
« Reply #285 on: 16:39:52, 05/07/19 »
Stonecrop and Herb Robert. Amazing how plants colonise spoil heaps.

barewirewalker

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Re: Flora
« Reply #286 on: 19:18:02, 25/07/19 »
Any help with this one would be appreciated. From our recent Scotland trip, on an Argyll peninsular, fairly remote, on the sheltered not seaward side of a hill, in boggy pasture.
P1060126 by Barewirewalker, on Flickr
I think I have come across it before but can't remember where from.  :tickedoff: frustration!
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richardh1905

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Re: Flora
« Reply #287 on: 20:38:07, 25/07/19 »

Looks like Marsh Cinquefoil.


Came across it here in Orkney, Mull Head nature reserve, growing on the banks of and in a very small burn.

barewirewalker

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Re: Flora
« Reply #288 on: 21:33:46, 25/07/19 »
Thanks Richard I'll check it out.
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barewirewalker

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Re: Flora
« Reply #289 on: 08:25:39, 26/07/19 »
So simple to follow up on the internet, when some kind person provides the correct name;
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Marsh Cinquefoil likes wet, boggy places, fens and peaty meadows. When it is in flower, between May and July, it is a good source of food for nectar-loving insects, such as bees and hoverflies. Marsh Cinquefoil is one of a number of cinquefoils, but is unique in the UK as the only one with deep magenta flowers - the rest have yellow flowers. It is a member of the rose family.
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Marsh cinquefoil's intense magenta hue brightens up the wet places in which it likes to grow.

Its flowers are shaped unlike many others in the UK, appearing like two five-pointed stars, one smaller and a deeper purple colour set above another, larger and paler. The flowers can grow up to 2.5 cm in size on a plant up to 45 cm tall. Its leaves are toothed with a blueish-green tinge on their underside.

As my photo was taken in the evening, I think the flower was closing up for the night, some far more attractive pictures here.
Two separate articles claim it is related to the strawberry and a member of the rose family, Oh What a convoluted web are family connections  ;D
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MarkT

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Re: Flora
« Reply #290 on: 19:48:36, 05/08/19 »

A small crop of Sunflowers at the end of a farmers field which the Bees loved








sunnydale

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Re: Flora
« Reply #291 on: 07:23:51, 06/08/19 »
Lovely Mark O0
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barewirewalker

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Re: Flora
« Reply #292 on: 18:14:53, 07/08/19 »
An Orchid with a sea view;
P1060595 by Barewirewalker, on Flickr
Never found one before on sand dunes.

It is a slightly different shape to the Common Meadow Orchid I am used to finding.
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barewirewalker

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Re: Flora
« Reply #293 on: 10:51:51, 08/08/19 »
I think I have the answer to my own question.
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Pyramidal Orchid - Anacamptis pyramidalis; The name 'pyramidal' comes from the conical shape of the young infloresence of this plant. Once the flower is fully developed it becomes more cylindrical or egg-shaped, which can sometimes cause confusion.
The coastal dune slacks are very good places for seeing these orchids in Britain and Ireland.
Useful webpage here.
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fernman

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Re: Flora
« Reply #294 on: 14:06:13, 08/08/19 »
I think I have the answer to my own question.

I'll second that, bww. I've only just seen your photo properly on my desktop pc; on my little laptop a wee bit of the flower was visible on the edge of the screen.
It's just like one I saw on a walk last week, anything but pyramidal! 

barewirewalker

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Re: Flora
« Reply #295 on: 11:31:14, 09/08/19 »
Fernman, Thanks for that confirmation  O0 .
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ninthace

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Something for Fernman to enjoy.
« Reply #296 on: 06:05:42, 02/11/19 »
Took these today for Fernman to enjoy.


A bit bigger than the average UK fern
Solvitur Ambulando

fernman

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Re: Flora
« Reply #297 on: 09:06:56, 02/11/19 »
Thank you. And for tree ferns those are exceptionally tall ones!
They are where, please?

ninthace

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Re: Flora
« Reply #298 on: 09:19:43, 02/11/19 »
Thank you. And for tree ferns those are exceptionally tall ones!
They are where, please?
On the northern slopes of Mount Taranaki. I think they are called Rough Tree Ferns.  There were some much bigger ones but they were not easy to photograph. For a picture of Taranaki see last post in http://www.walkingforum.co.uk/index.php?topic=38878.0
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WhitstableDave

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Re: Flora
« Reply #299 on: 09:42:25, 02/11/19 »
It's been a good year in Kent for Early Purple Orchids.

One of the best places to see them was along the clifftops at Dover, which is where I spotted this rare white one...