Author Topic: Flora  (Read 47068 times)

ninthace

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Spring Flower
« Reply #330 on: 12:07:12, 02/04/20 »
A lot of these flowers are starting to appear on the banks under hedgerows.  Can anyone identify them please?





Solvitur Ambulando

barewirewalker

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Re: Flora
« Reply #331 on: 12:28:25, 02/04/20 »
Looks like Stitchwort to me. Common but under appreciated in my opinion. Called after needle and thread work on a country girls dress as the flower can be so easily represented by simple stitching.
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Jac

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Re: Flora
« Reply #332 on: 12:30:04, 02/04/20 »
+1 Greater Stitchwort I think

Never thought of the reason for the name before :)
So many paths, so little time

ninthace

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Re: Flora
« Reply #333 on: 12:37:16, 02/04/20 »
Thanks.  They have just started to pop out in profusion.  All this daily lane walking has given me a greater appreciation of the hedgerow flower season.  Before my knee problem and all wet weather, we used to drive past all that, straight for the moors or the coast.  The bad weather and the lock down has given me a greater appreciation of what we have on the doorstep.
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Jac

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Re: Flora
« Reply #334 on: 12:48:15, 02/04/20 »
Thanks.  They have just started to pop out in profusion.  All this daily lane walking has given me a greater appreciation of the hedgerow flower season.  Before my knee problem and all wet weather, we used to drive past all that, straight for the moors or the coast.  The bad weather and the lock down has given me a greater appreciation of what we have on the doorstep.

Me too. I would have driven to Dunsford Woods on the R Teign to see dippers. Yesterday I saw one half a mile from home on the Alphinbrook.
So many paths, so little time

ninthace

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Re: Flora
« Reply #335 on: 12:55:46, 02/04/20 »
Me too. I would have driven to Dunsford Woods on the R Teign to see dippers. Yesterday I saw one half a mile from home on the Alphinbrook.
Funny you should say that, the week before last I went for a walk on the Exe Valley Way from Tiverton while my car was being serviced and saw a brace of dippers at Iron Bridge.
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sunnydale

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Re: Flora
« Reply #336 on: 16:56:55, 02/04/20 »
I have Stitchwort in my garden & Iím  so looking forward to it flowering! 8)
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WhitstableDave

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Re: Flora
« Reply #337 on: 13:27:11, 06/04/20 »
I saw lots of flowering garlic mustard on my walk this morning.

This is one of my favourite spring wildflowers because I like to break up the leaves and sniff the garlic as I walk along.  :)



I know they're edible, but I've not chanced nibbling them yet.  :-\

fernman

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Re: Flora
« Reply #338 on: 18:29:51, 06/04/20 »
I can tesify that garlic mustard is quite edible. It used to grow plentifully in my garden and we used to add it to salads.
But don't take too much, for the orange tip butterfly, which we should be seeing in a week or two if this warm weather keeps up, lays its eggs on the underside of the leaves for the larvae to feed on.
I am saying that for the benefit of the future of the butterlies, not yours.

sunnydale

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Re: Flora
« Reply #339 on: 21:07:08, 06/04/20 »
I think thatís the plant thatís also known as Jack-by-the hedge  O0
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Jac

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Re: Flora
« Reply #340 on: 10:29:32, 07/04/20 »
Orange tip butterflies already here (Devon) spent some time watching and photographing two males (the ones with the orange tips) sparring in the sunshine.

A family out walking came past and, at the risk of sounding too nerdy, I pointed out the butterflies - from their delighted reaction I reckon quite a number of people, especially children, will be enjoying and building up their personal knowledge of nature this spring


(Sadly, still can't find a way to post pics. I've tried everything suggested :( )
So many paths, so little time

Jac

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Re: Flora
« Reply #341 on: 10:30:23, 07/04/20 »
I think thatís the plant thatís also known as Jack-by-the hedge  O0

that's me! and yes, the young leaves are delicious - slightly peppery
So many paths, so little time

fernman

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Re: Flora
« Reply #342 on: 11:38:53, 07/04/20 »
A family out walking came past and, at the risk of sounding too nerdy, I pointed out the butterflies - from their delighted reaction I reckon quite a number of people, especially children, will be enjoying and building up their personal knowledge of nature this spring

My wife and I did an 8 day tour of Iceland, when we were the only two Brits on a coachload of Americans. Part of the pleasure of the trip for me personally was seeing the country's ferns.
At one stop an American lady came across to see what I was examining, which was a diminutive arctic-alpine species that is extremely rare in the UK, just about hanging on at a handful of sites in Scotland, NW England and Snowdonia, and yet it is fairly common in fissures in Iceland's glaciated rocks.
The woman listened attentively as I detailed the fern's ecology to her. Then at another stop later in the day I had a feeling of pride when I accidentally overheard her repeating everything I had said to a group of her fellow countrymen.

Jac

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Re: Flora
« Reply #343 on: 18:46:29, 07/04/20 »
My wife and I did an 8 day tour of Iceland, when we were the only two Brits on a coachload of Americans. Part of the pleasure of the trip for me personally was seeing the country's ferns.
At one stop an American lady came across to see what I was examining, which was a diminutive arctic-alpine species that is extremely rare in the UK, just about hanging on at a handful of sites in Scotland, NW England and Snowdonia, and yet it is fairly common in fissures in Iceland's glaciated rocks.
The woman listened attentively as I detailed the fern's ecology to her. Then at another stop later in the day I had a feeling of pride when I accidentally overheard her repeating everything I had said to a group of her fellow countrymen.

Did she credit you?
So many paths, so little time

pleb

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Re: Flora
« Reply #344 on: 11:53:16, 12/04/20 »


wood anemone and cowslip.