Author Topic: Summit Slugs & Hiking Etiquette  (Read 7643 times)

ninthace

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Re: Summit Slugs & Hiking Etiquette
« Reply #60 on: 07:21:01, 18/05/20 »
Yes. The story of the mines caught my eye.  It would have to wait until things are more normal.
Solvitur Ambulando

BuzyG

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Re: Summit Slugs & Hiking Etiquette
« Reply #61 on: 09:48:20, 18/05/20 »
Here it is
http://sdbwanderings.blogspot.com/2020/05/an-ode-to-summit-slug.html
Video
https://youtu.be/9nb-YngP75c



Excellent 😁
I doubt anything will change where summit slugs are concerned, judging by the walk I did today, most people observed the two metre distancing, moving over to one side as I moved over to the other when we passed,however a lot of them walked past me as if they never heard of covid 19, unbelievable,
I arrived at the summit of Yes tor yesterday just as two fell runners were departing and a large family group was arriving.  The family group saw me coming up and waited even calling their little girl back to them away from the summit as soon as they spotted I was waiting.  I thanked them touched the trig point and jogged off toward High Willhays.  A lot of people out on the moor Yesterday. I spotted dozens, which is busy for Dartmoor.

richardh1905

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Re: Summit Slugs & Hiking Etiquette
« Reply #62 on: 12:28:24, 18/05/20 »
Yes. The story of the mines caught my eye.  It would have to wait until things are more normal.


I do like poking around old mines.

richardh1905

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Re: Summit Slugs & Hiking Etiquette
« Reply #63 on: 12:34:26, 18/05/20 »
I arrived at the summit of Yes tor yesterday just as two fell runners were departing and a large family group was arriving.  The family group saw me coming up and waited even calling their little girl back to them away from the summit as soon as they spotted I was waiting.  I thanked them touched the trig point and jogged off toward High Willhays.  A lot of people out on the moor Yesterday. I spotted dozens, which is busy for Dartmoor.


Good that some people behave in a sensible and courteous manner - I'm sure that the vast majority do, but it is the ones who don't that we tend to remember.
I often skip the trig point or summit cairn of a peak if it is crowded - did so when we climbed Ben Nevis as the summit platform was mobbed.

BuzyG

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Re: Summit Slugs & Hiking Etiquette
« Reply #64 on: 14:27:48, 18/05/20 »

Good that some people behave in a sensible and courteous manner - I'm sure that the vast majority do, but it is the ones who don't that we tend to remember.
I often skip the trig point or summit cairn of a peak if it is crowded - did so when we climbed Ben Nevis as the summit platform was mobbed.
Ben Nevis, Scar-fell Pike and Snowdon, where each deserted at the time I first visited.  Neither have I any idea of the view from any of them.  Just turn up in what others consider awful weather, you can have the place to yourself every time.

A question that fits this thread. If you can have only one or the other.  Would you chose a crowded route in the sunshine or the silent solitude of a mizzley day, when few will venture out.  I sat at Cranmere pool for a butty break yesterday. Beautiful sunny day.  A have sat at the same spot in pea soup fog a number of times and to be honest I enjoy both in equal measure. O0

Islandplodder

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Re: Summit Slugs & Hiking Etiquette
« Reply #65 on: 19:23:38, 18/05/20 »
Having read John Hillaby's experiences with Cranmere Pool, I think I would probably avoid it either way.  Actually I agree with you when it comes to low level walks, they can be lovely in the mist, but when it comes to climbing up things I like to see something from the top, reward for effort and all that.

Bigfoot_Mike

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Re: Summit Slugs & Hiking Etiquette
« Reply #66 on: 19:45:45, 18/05/20 »
I much prefer solitude in rain than the company of many in bright sunshine. Mist and bad weather can have a lot going for it. I have summited Snowdon at 0500 during the week and watched the sun rise over a cloud inversion. The route up was in thick mist, but there was no one outside my small group on the mountain. We had the bonus of an empty descent of Crib Goch and its north ridge on the way down. I have been on Hellvellyn summit on Easter Saturday and shared the top only with my walking companion. The weather was horrendous, with a screaming gale and a whiteout, but it was good to have the mountain to ourselves.

Mel

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Re: Summit Slugs & Hiking Etiquette
« Reply #67 on: 22:45:47, 18/05/20 »
....A question that fits this thread. If you can have only one or the other.  Would you chose a crowded route in the sunshine or the silent solitude of a mizzley day, when few will venture out. 


At the moment?  Crowds.  Lots and lots of people.  Even the annoying ones with screaming, disrespectful, out of control kids.  Never thought I'd hear myself saying this but I miss being around people.
I'm tired of people bein' ugly to each other. It feels like pieces of glass in my head. - John Coffey, The Green Mile

BuzyG

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Re: Summit Slugs & Hiking Etiquette
« Reply #68 on: 08:46:14, 19/05/20 »
I have summited Snowdon at 0500 during the week and watched the sun rise over a cloud inversion. The route up was in thick mist, but there was no one outside my small group on the mountain. We had the bonus of an empty descent of Crib Goch and its north ridge on the way down.
Now that sounds like the perfect way to summit any mountain.  8) O0

BuzyG

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Re: Summit Slugs & Hiking Etiquette
« Reply #69 on: 09:48:26, 19/05/20 »
Having read John Hillaby's experiences with Cranmere Pool, I think I would probably avoid it either way.  Actually I agree with you when it comes to low level walks, they can be lovely in the mist, but when it comes to climbing up things I like to see something from the top, reward for effort and all that.
I take your point on climbing up things for the view. 


As for Cranmere pool I gather Mr Hillaby came a cropper there about.  For me it's a magical silent oasis of calm.  For others a desolate patch of soggy peat bog in the middle of no where.

Toxicbunny

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Re: Summit Slugs & Hiking Etiquette
« Reply #70 on: 09:50:11, 20/05/20 »
I've come across a few summit slugs. When I reach the summit I like to be able to take a quick photo. I will stand there patiently waiting for them to finish what they are doing so I can take a few photos. However I have come across a few ignorant slugs who will just sit at the cairn with no intention of moving.  If they are that ignorant then I am too and let my large dog on a loser lead and I will stand at the cairn regardless of where they are sat for a photo with my dog walking on them O0 .

ninthace

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Re: Summit Slugs & Hiking Etiquette
« Reply #71 on: 13:29:42, 20/05/20 »
Nobody but the landowner owns a summit and everybody who gets there has the right to sit, enjoy the view or eat their sandwiches or whatever (within the bounds of human decency).  I for one am happy to be in anyone's picture.
Solvitur Ambulando

Toxicbunny

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Re: Summit Slugs & Hiking Etiquette
« Reply #72 on: 13:33:17, 20/05/20 »
Nobody but the landowner owns a summit and everybody who gets there has the right to sit, enjoy the view or eat their sandwiches or whatever (within the bounds of human decency).  I for one am happy to be in anyone's picture.
Well personally if I'm at a summit I will move on if others want a photograph at the Trig for instance.  Many do without issue apart from the slugs.


ninthace

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Re: Summit Slugs & Hiking Etiquette
« Reply #73 on: 14:18:32, 20/05/20 »
Well personally if I'm at a summit I will move on if others want a photograph at the Trig for instance.  Many do without issue apart from the slugs.
So would I, temporarily, if asked nicely, but this forum is the only place I have ever heard the term "summit slug" and I have never had a problem sharing my "moment of triumph" - it is not Everest for heaven's sake and I have never had the urge to claim sole rights, even for the duration of a photograph.
Solvitur Ambulando

watershed

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Re: Summit Slugs & Hiking Etiquette
« Reply #74 on: 14:32:05, 20/05/20 »
Good manners would make me move out of their way.
I would offer to take their photo and have done so a few times in the past on Ronas hill, which is the only hill in Shetland that I can recall sharing the summit on.
I have shared a few summits South, the most recent being the Ben last year, which I gather is always busy. Although  to give them their due people took turns getting their photo's taking on the Trig point and the shelter. They then dispersed to admire the views.