Author Topic: Ueli Steck  (Read 1245 times)

phil1960

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Touching from a distance, further all the time.

Dyffryn Ardudwy

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Re: Ueli Steck
« Reply #1 on: 19:32:06, 01/05/17 »
However fit and experienced a mountaineer you are, scaling Mt Everest without Supplementary oxygen, and at speed, alway's poses a risk to the body.


This is what Ueli was trying to achieve, reaching the summit, Alpine style, at speed, or quicker than was advisable.

Last year, a very interesting scientific programme was shown on the BBC, whereby medical academics from one of the main Oxford colleges, undertook blood oxygen experiments on various multiple Everest summiteers, and noted Sherpas, throughout their journey up the mountain.


Even the most experienced climbers showed dangerously low red blood count, when pushing themselves to the limit above Camp 3, approaching the 8000m Death Zone.

Some of the climbers simply did not realise the extent to which their bodies were shutting down, due to blood saturation levels.
A few of them  felt physically and mentally strong, but were wise enough to listen to medical advice, and return to safety.

There are still only a few climbers who have successfully reached the top of Everest without using bottled oxygen, Reinhold Messner being the most famous.

Treat Everest with disrespect, and you may live to regret it.
« Last Edit: 19:35:11, 01/05/17 by Dyffryn Ardudwy »

jontea

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Re: Ueli Steck
« Reply #2 on: 20:10:53, 01/05/17 »
However fit and experienced a mountaineer you are, scaling Mt Everest without Supplementary oxygen, and at speed, alway's poses a risk to the body.


This is what Ueli was trying to achieve, reaching the summit, Alpine style, at speed, or quicker than was advisable.

Last year, a very interesting scientific programme was shown on the BBC, whereby medical academics from one of the main Oxford colleges, undertook blood oxygen experiments on various multiple Everest summiteers, and noted Sherpas, throughout their journey up the mountain.


Even the most experienced climbers showed dangerously low red blood count, when pushing themselves to the limit above Camp 3, approaching the 8000m Death Zone.

Some of the climbers simply did not realise the extent to which their bodies were shutting down, due to blood saturation levels.
A few of them  felt physically and mentally strong, but were wise enough to listen to medical advice, and return to safety.

There are still only a few climbers who have successfully reached the top of Everest without using bottled oxygen, Reinhold Messner being the most famous.

Treat Everest with disrespect, and you may live to regret it.


Sorry but I find this post disrespectful to a climber who achieved much in a very distinguished career


RIP Ueli Steck
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grinderman

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Re: Ueli Steck
« Reply #3 on: 20:13:48, 01/05/17 »
A tragic accident it appears. He had summitted without oxygen before and was vastly experienced in these conditions.

Dyffryn Ardudwy

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Re: Ueli Steck
« Reply #4 on: 20:15:42, 01/05/17 »
Your opinion is justified, but still no athlete, however fit and professional, has the right to push themselves to the limit, on a mountain known to kill two out of ever ten who reach its summit.
I am not being disrespectful at all, just pointing out that the human body is not designed to work above 8000m, without supplementary oxygen.

The Eiger is not the highest mountain on earth, Everest is, treat it with the respect it deserves.

I am allowed my opinion on the subject, and if it upsets you, i am sorry, it was not intended.

midweekmountain

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Re: Ueli Steck
« Reply #5 on: 21:41:35, 01/05/17 »
Ueli Steck was one of my heroes......

One of the best ways of peering into Ueli's amazing world is via Jonathan Griffiths website.

Jonathan, top Chamonix guide, regular climbing partner of Ueli's Steck and one of the best outdoor action phographers around.
Not suprisingly another one of my heroes.....

Many of Ueli's exploits are written up and photographed here...a great website check it out.

http://alpineexposures.com/expeditions/getting-schooled-in-scotland-with-the-steckhttp://

Innominate Man

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Re: Ueli Steck
« Reply #6 on: 00:16:12, 02/05/17 »
As I have written elsewhere on here - I was reading and just finished (today) " Into The Silence " which is primarily about Mallory: So the news last night about Ueli was both poignant and very sad. I admired him greatly for both his abilities and his humility and was very surprised that he had lost his life.


It does show that Everest is no place to be trusted, be you Ueli or Mallory (or Irvine, for that matter) - accidents can befall anyone.
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RIP Ueli Steck


+ 1
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April

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Re: Ueli Steck
« Reply #7 on: 23:10:13, 02/05/17 »
A very sad loss of an amazing climber and athlete  :(

RIP Ueli
"Who would've thought...... you are light and darkness coming through" words by Tim Armstrong

Miguel

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Re: Ueli Steck
« Reply #8 on: 11:32:46, 04/05/17 »
Hi Dyffryn
Any idea of where can I find that interesting scientific programme on the BBC? Thanks

I also found interesting this article: newyorker.com/news/news-desk/ueli-steck-and-a-fateful-retourn-to-everest
Passionate about helping people discover the majestic Pyrenees range that are off the beaten track.

tonyk

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Re: Ueli Steck
« Reply #9 on: 12:40:53, 06/05/17 »
However fit and experienced a mountaineer you are, scaling Mt Everest without Supplementary oxygen, and at speed, alway's poses a risk to the body.


This is what Ueli was trying to achieve, reaching the summit, Alpine style, at speed, or quicker than was advisable.

Last year, a very interesting scientific programme was shown on the BBC, whereby medical academics from one of the main Oxford colleges, undertook blood oxygen experiments on various multiple Everest summiteers, and noted Sherpas, throughout their journey up the mountain.


Even the most experienced climbers showed dangerously low red blood count, when pushing themselves to the limit above Camp 3, approaching the 8000m Death Zone.

Some of the climbers simply did not realise the extent to which their bodies were shutting down, due to blood saturation levels.
A few of them  felt physically and mentally strong, but were wise enough to listen to medical advice, and return to safety.

There are still only a few climbers who have successfully reached the top of Everest without using bottled oxygen, Reinhold Messner being the most famous.

Treat Everest with disrespect, and you may live to regret it.

 Mr Steck was climbing Nuptse rather than Everest.Its summit is lower than 8000m.

 Its a shame that he got the chop but the longer you carry on doing these extreme climbs the more chance of it happening

Dyffryn Ardudwy

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Re: Ueli Steck
« Reply #10 on: 12:32:54, 11/05/17 »
Another unfortunate accident occurred recently, where by an elderly 85yr old Nepalese gentleman died at Everest Base Camp.
He was trying to beat the record of the oldest person to the summit, currently standing at 80yrs.

If one has the financial means, anyone within reason, can have a go at climbing the mountain, and numerous people have lied to expedition organisers, who have very strict experience criteria, and successfully summited and returned safely.

Everest fever, has gripped so many people, that some return numerous times, trying to reach the top.

We should never forget, that for every ten people who reach the highest place on earth, two will not return to Base camp alive.

Its a dangerous mountain, and needs to be treated with more respect.

sussamb

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Re: Ueli Steck
« Reply #11 on: 15:28:14, 11/05/17 »
We should never forget, that for every ten people who reach the highest place on earth, two will not return to Base camp alive.

Its a dangerous mountain ...

It's a dangerous (and incorrect) statistic  ;D

Nearly 7000 people have summited Everest, with deaths standing at just over 260 ... hardly 2 in 10  ;)

Current death rate is around 0.5%.
« Last Edit: 15:31:47, 11/05/17 by sussamb »
Where there's a will ...

Innominate Man

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Re: Ueli Steck
« Reply #12 on: 18:04:57, 11/05/17 »
Sounds like 'Fake news'  ;)
Only a hill but all of life to me,
Up there, between the sunset and the sea.  Geoffrey Winthrop Young.

Jac

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Re: Ueli Steck
« Reply #13 on: 19:18:50, 11/05/17 »
It's a dangerous (and incorrect) statistic  ;D
..............and again ;D
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