Author Topic: Fur Tor - Route Choice  (Read 744 times)

ninthace

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Fur Tor - Route Choice
« on: 20:09:42, 17/07/17 »
Having started to run out routes on the SWCP that are within reasonable striking distance of home, Mrs N and I have transferred our attention to North Dartmoor and have started to bang in some routes. Fur Tor is slowly making its way to the top of my list after some tempting views of it from High Willhays and Great Links recently and have had look at possible routes for a day hike on the map and GoogleEarth. I have identified routes from Lane End, Postbridge,Two Bridges or New Bridge under Yes Tor. Does anyone have anything to offer about these options in terms of the most attractive/least bog hoppy route?
« Last Edit: 22:50:33, 17/07/17 by ninthace »
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thomasdevon

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Re: Fur Tor - Route Choice
« Reply #1 on: 22:19:13, 17/07/17 »

Fur Tor is a long way from anywhere but well worth the trek and the climb at the end of it.


I have wild camped there twice just N of Cut Combe Water on the N side, having hiked in from Belstone three times.


First attempt to get there failed as I tried to go cross-country from Okement Hill intending to contour to Fur Tor from the E via Black Ridge and Black Hill. But this is terrible going, across a peat plateau with 6ft deep hags, boggy at the bottoms and difficult to clamber into / out of. Fell here and bent a trekking pole.


Second attempt via Dinger Tor across Brim Brook, then Great Kneeset, then Little Kneeset. I enjoyed this, Dinger is easy to get to along the artillery roads from the N, and gives a good view over "Dinger Plain": the view from Great Kneeset is very worthwhile. The stretch across from Great to Little Kneeset is horrid, hummock grass and boggy, tough walking.


T avoid this I tried a third route, SSW from Dinger, then along the W Okement S of Lints Tor to pick up the head of the Amicombe Brook, then intending to go S to Cut Combe Water and turn E to camp N of Fur Tor again. From memory, the valley of the upper E Okement is very steep-sided, flat-bottomed and very very boggy. It is curious in that within half a mile it has a river running N and then one running S, though the valley floor appears dead level between the two points. The ground opens out and firms up nicely as the valley opens, and the impression is that this area might once have been a pre-historic lake.


Its a tough walk. Actually, if starting from the N, I suspect the best views and reasonable going would be Dinger to Lints Tors, then the steep side of Amicombe Hill as far N as possible, then S along its shoulder until as far S as poss before the Amicombe, then crossing E or SE direct towards Fur Tor. I would like to try this some time but its a bit far and a bit tough for me personally in day starting from Belstone.


Fur Tor is a great objective, well worth the difficulties of getting there.

ninthace

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Re: Fur Tor - Route Choice
« Reply #2 on: 22:57:08, 17/07/17 »
Thanks for your opinion TD. I have eyed it from Dinger Tor but on the day in question I was heading across to the shoulder of the High Willhays ridge so it did not get the attention it deserved. You could save some walking time by driving up the MoD roads and parking where the tarmac runs out E of West Mill Tor (New Bridge?) Certainly this route means the shortest drive for me as I live at the bottom end of North Devon.
« Last Edit: 23:03:34, 17/07/17 by ninthace »
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thomasdevon

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Re: Fur Tor - Route Choice
« Reply #3 on: 08:24:47, 18/07/17 »
Hi ninthace -


Yes, there is a public road access past the Okehampton army camp to what's called OP22 (Observation Post 22) where there is limited parking. It is immediately W of E Okement Farm. A rough road leads S from there then W over the N shoulder of E Mill Tor and down to New Bridge. Cross the bridge here and turn L for the Dinger trackway. After Dinger there are no military roads in this region of the moor.


Its quite a thing to get to Fur Tor. Its much more isolated than Cranmere Pool, the historic centre of the north moor. Its a bracing climb to the top and the tor formations don't disapppoint. I wish you well on the journey.

DevonDave

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Re: Fur Tor - Route Choice
« Reply #4 on: 09:44:32, 18/07/17 »
Apologies for the delay in joining the discussion - I've been busy decorating  :( .


Probably the easiest way to get to Fur Tor is from Lane End and this also has the advantage of going through the dramatic scenery of Tavy Cleave.  Walk up through the Cleave on the north side of the Tavy and cross the Rattle Brook at Deadlake Foot.  From there head to Sandy Ford.  The water at Sandy Ford is usually too deep to ford without getting wet feet, so you will probably need to continue up the Amicombe Brook until you reach a suitable crossing point.  From there it is not too far to Fur Tor.  On the return walk, from Deadlake Foot instead of walking back down through Tavy Cleave head uphill to Ger Tor from where there are fine views looking down on the Cleave.


I agree with thomasdevon, some of the approaches to Fur Tor are not very pleasant, so you need to avoid the ones he mentions.


I have never walked to Fur Tor from the Postbridge or Two Bridges direction.  From Two Bridges I would think you could encounter some tricky wet ground, but there is a route from Postbridge described here:  http://www.richkni.co.uk/dartmoor/fur.htm


There is an alternative route starting from Willsworthy.  This was described in Dartmoor Magazine some time ago and is a walk I keep meaning to do but have never got round to it.  I will PM you and attach a copy.
« Last Edit: 12:42:19, 18/07/17 by DevonDave »

Wurz

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Re: Fur Tor - Route Choice
« Reply #5 on: 16:33:18, 18/07/17 »
I don't think Fur Tor is that remote when approached from the west.  Whilst that way is the shortest and probably the most interesting the river crossings can be a PITA when it's wet.  That said, today excepted the moor is quite dry at the mo.


I don't think it's particularly good to come from the north.  the ground is pretty crap and you've got a lot of it on the military roads which I find quite tedious.


I've done it from Merrivale - long and boggy.


I've also done it from Postbridge.  Up the East Dart and then to the North West Passage.  The river walk is nice.  And as a route it isn't bad.






thomasdevon

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Re: Fur Tor - Route Choice
« Reply #6 on: 21:52:21, 18/07/17 »
I don't think Fur Tor is that remote when approached from the west.  Whilst that way is the shortest and probably the most interesting the river crossings can be a PITA when it's wet.  That said, today excepted the moor is quite dry at the mo.


I don't think it's particularly good to come from the north.  the ground is pretty crap and you've got a lot of it on the military roads which I find quite tedious.


I've done it from Merrivale - long and boggy.


I've also done it from Postbridge.  Up the East Dart and then to the North West Passage.  The river walk is nice.  And as a route it isn't bad.




Its all true Wurz - if the objective was to "bag" Tor, it would be best to approach from the west. But I'm cantankerous and always set off from Belstone or Bennett's Cross for all points on the north moor - if its too far for one day, then its a wild camp. Sorry, but I want the journey, not the arrival.

DartmoorWildCamper

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Re: Fur Tor - Route Choice
« Reply #7 on: 11:00:22, 21/07/17 »
I walked to Fur Tor from Postbridge a month ago, fortunately the route was very dry due to the hot weather we'd been having. I reckon it's an extremely boggy walk when it's been raining by  the looks of the ground. I headed up to Sandy hole pass and then up Cut Hill and across to Fur Tor. A long walk mainly uphill all of the way, but as others have mentioned it's well worth the effort. I had no alternative but to take this route due to some of the ranges being in use. My route can be found in detail in my blog with some great photo's as we had the most wonderful sunset. I for one will be heading back here as soon as I can. Have a great journey  O0

ninthace

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Re: Fur Tor - Route Choice
« Reply #8 on: 12:47:52, 21/07/17 »
I walked to Fur Tor from Postbridge a month ago, fortunately the route was very dry due to the hot weather we'd been having. I reckon it's an extremely boggy walk when it's been raining by  the looks of the ground. I headed up to Sandy hole pass and then up Cut Hill and across to Fur Tor. A long walk mainly uphill all of the way, but as others have mentioned it's well worth the effort. I had no alternative but to take this route due to some of the ranges being in use. My route can be found in detail in my blog with some great photo's as we had the most wonderful sunset. I for one will be heading back here as soon as I can. Have a great journey  O0
Thanks for that. I was up on Hangingstone Hill and the White Horse Ridge yesterday and  the recent rain has made the moor soggy again. Crossing the Teign was a bit of a paddle and I was gaitered throughout. Today's weather will have done nothing to improve the route I suspect.
I have even been mulling over an approach from Fernworthy but that is on the back burner unless conditions are really dry after yesterday. At the moment, Postbridge, Willworthy or Lane End are favourites.
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shane_uk

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Re: Fur Tor - Route Choice
« Reply #9 on: 21:46:20, 07/08/17 »
A friend of ours went from lanes end a few weeks ago but most people we no hit it from bagga tor.

thomasdevon

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Re: Fur Tor - Route Choice
« Reply #10 on: 22:22:39, 07/08/17 »
A friend of ours went from lanes end a few weeks ago but most people we no hit it from bagga tor.




But isn't it a cop out to drive to the closest point possible and then saunter up for a picnic? No to mention missing out on a fine hike. Surely, if we enjoy hiking, then the longer the hike, the greater the enjoyment?

shane_uk

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Re: Fur Tor - Route Choice
« Reply #11 on: 23:25:02, 07/08/17 »




But isn't it a cop out to drive to the closest point possible and then saunter up for a picnic? No to mention missing out on a fine hike. Surely, if we enjoy hiking, then the longer the hike, the greater the enjoyment?


We don't do picnics and we don't saunter but we do collect along the way.

thomasdevon

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Re: Fur Tor - Route Choice
« Reply #12 on: 07:41:57, 08/08/17 »

We don't do picnics and we don't saunter but we do collect along the way.




OK, that's a fair point, and Fur Tor is a demanding trek no matter where you start from. Enjoying a good day's hike is the important thing.

DevonDave

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Re: Fur Tor - Route Choice
« Reply #13 on: 08:29:04, 08/08/17 »



But isn't it a cop out to drive to the closest point possible and then saunter up for a picnic? No to mention missing out on a fine hike. Surely, if we enjoy hiking, then the longer the hike, the greater the enjoyment?


Yes, but we must remember that not everyone is capable or confident enough to walk longer distances across difficult terrain.

ninthace

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Re: Fur Tor - Route Choice
« Reply #14 on: 14:50:45, 08/08/17 »
Ok. Decision made. I have plotted the route from Willworthy, as suggested by Devondave, in over Hare Tor and out via Tavy Cleave. Basically it looks like an interesting route and minimises my car mileage coming in from North Devon. I am just waiting for a few days of dry weather to let the water levels drop for the stream crossings involved. Hopefully, it won't be too long. Thanks to all for their contributions.
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