Author Topic: Mountain rescue information  (Read 697 times)

sussamb

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Where there's a will ...

DevonDave

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Re: Mountain rescue information
« Reply #1 on: 10:17:19, 23/07/17 »
Thanks for posting that sussamb, it's an interesting read.  After having read it I have now registered my phone with the emergency SMS system, which is something I hadn't thought about doing before.  O0

fernman

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Re: Mountain rescue information
« Reply #2 on: 10:34:24, 23/07/17 »
After having read it I have now registered my phone with the emergency SMS system, which is something I hadn't thought about doing before.

I did that when I got my new phone at Christmas - it told me I was already registered.
It never occurred to me it is the number that is registered and not the phone. Duh! :-[

Dyffryn Ardudwy

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Re: Mountain rescue information
« Reply #3 on: 19:17:40, 23/07/17 »
All sound advice, but what if there is no phone signal for miles around.
Last Wednesday, i thought i would re visit the famous Tregaron to Llanwrtyd Wells, Drovers Rd, that follows the area of hills in Mid Wales, known as the Welsh Desert.


The road is 21miles long, and far narrower than i remembered it.
As a kind of experiment, i had three mobile phones with me, mainly because i had been ticked off by relatives for not taking a mobile with me, when walking the hills.

I am sad to report, that the old red telephone box, around seven miles outside Tregaron, is now derelict, still in decent repair, with its glass panels in place, but the phone and internal bits and pieces have now been removed.

My first phone, an old Sony Ericcson, was useless, no signal at all.
The second, a cheapy from Asda, costing only 10, was also useless.

I brought out my Apple I phone 5, thinking with this kind of technology, i must be able to phone a friend back home.

All three phones were useless, and it was touch and go in Tregaron, with only the Iphone gaining a good signal.

Calling out the Mountain Rescue, is fine, if one can obtain a clear signal, but the article was written by someone who has not taken into account, the very remote rural areas of the Uk, where due to a tiny population, the phone providers cannot see the need to spend considerable money to install ugly phone masts.

The only provider who can give me a reliable signal in sleepy Dyffryn, is EE.
Vodaphone, Virgin and the other big names, see no point in spending money on such small populated areas.

Whilst voting in the elections a few weeks ago, i asked how many were on the Harlech, Llanfair, Dyffryn, and Barmouth register, 2128 lost souls.

Parts of Mid Wales are in effect a no go area, because if one falls ill, or is involved in an accident, phoning for the emergency services is a non starter.

Still a very interesting article to read, but contacting the mountain rescue the other side of Abergwesyn, forget it.
« Last Edit: 19:22:28, 23/07/17 by Dyffryn Ardudwy »

DevonDave

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Re: Mountain rescue information
« Reply #4 on: 22:12:11, 23/07/17 »
I don't think you have fully read the article DA.  It makes the point that often when there is no signal for voice calls it is still possible to send text messages.  Messages can be sent to 999 providing the caller has registered their phone in advance.

alewife

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Re: Mountain rescue information
« Reply #5 on: 22:52:34, 23/07/17 »
Plus, I've often had no signal at accommodation or at road level in Snowdonia but often manage to get a decent sinal once I get up a bit higher, not even near the top. Which is presumably where most mountain rescue incidents occur.
Alewife


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Dyffryn Ardudwy

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Re: Mountain rescue information
« Reply #6 on: 11:28:37, 24/07/17 »
The entire expanse of the Abergwesyn area, is totally void of any mobile signal, and whistling for assistance in the Abergwesyn area, is virtually useless.
The signal was very faint in the square in Tregaron, and during the entire 28mile journey towards the Newbridge on Wye A470 junction, i could not receive any mobile signal, from any network provider.
Those living in the heavily populated areas take it for granted that they can receive a mobile signal 24/7, but there are still certain areas of the Uk, where using a mobile phone is impossible.

Reading this mornings Western Mail, there is a very interesting article about two walkers who were attempting the very remote Fisherfield five Munros last Friday, is the remotest NW of Scotland.

A woman had to crawl several hours, after badly spraining her ankle, and both her and her friend had to spend the night out in the open.



Her friend had to walk the best part of five hours to raise the alarm, and inform the mountain rescue team.

A helicopter from Stornoway on Lewis, had to help in the rescue.

I am sure the walkers considered every possibility, including texting the emergency services, but walkers reliance on mobile phones cannot always be guaranteed.


I would have thought the emergency services would prefer to speak to someone over the phone, to ascertain the exact injuries involved, as well as a accurate grid reference.


Sending a text message, is far from ideal, and there are rare instances where hoax phonecalls have been given to the mountain rescue teams.


Are these remotest areas of the Uk, to become no go areas for us walkers.


We all take a risk venturing into the great outdoors, but 99% of the time, we can phone for assistance, if things go wrong, but certain parts of the Uk are still in the 19C, when it comes to technology.

If i had broken down last Wednesday, i would have had one heck of a long walk to access a phone, and throughout my trip, i only saw one car, and that was some distance away, going towards Llandovery.
« Last Edit: 20:50:49, 24/07/17 by Dyffryn Ardudwy »

Ridge

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Re: Mountain rescue information
« Reply #7 on: 11:40:43, 24/07/17 »
The article does talk about what to do if you have no signal. This doesn't take up much talking about as either you somehow make your way to a phone, or a companion does, in which case all the rest of the article is pertinent, or you sit with whistle and torch until someone else phones MRT after they have walked out.
There is nothing in the article to say that you will always have coverage everywhere in the country all the time but it is true that you are more likely to be able to text than call in some areas.



Yes there are areas with no mobile coverage but they are a damn site smaller than they were 35 years ago when I started lone walking.
Over hill, over dale. Thorough brush, thorough brier....
I do wander every where

Mel

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Re: Mountain rescue information
« Reply #8 on: 19:06:58, 24/07/17 »
Interesting article there sussamb.  I'd not even considered the effects of the down-draft from the helicopter's blades, never mind that a rope might be used initially to discharge static so it's best not to grab it  :o   I hope I never have to consider these things!  Thanks for posting it  O0
 
DA - the article (if you read it) is about WHAT to do should you need to call out mountain rescue, not the quality of the mobile phone signal.  As an aside, in sleepy Dyffryn, you may not be able to get a signal to text your pal saying "fancy a pint down the pub later old bean" but you may be able to get enough of a signal to text the 999 number with your message "got myself into a spot of bother chaps.  Seems I'm dangling from a darned inconsiderate cliff face with a broken leg".  Calling the 999 (or 112) number sort of overrides your normal phone network provider if needs be to hunt out the strongest signal, regardless of what network you're on. 
 
 
 
I did wonder what exactly should be sent in that initial text to the 999 number and found info in the downloadable leaflet in this link: http://www.emergencysms.org.uk/
 
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Islandplodder

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Re: Mountain rescue information
« Reply #9 on: 19:12:29, 24/07/17 »
Thanks for that link, Mel, I was wondering that as well.

route2rock

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Re: Mountain rescue information
« Reply #10 on: 21:46:19, 25/07/17 »
Others have eluded to it, but it is worth while noting that calling 999 works on any network, regardless of who you are registered with.

For example if you are with Vodafone, and have no coverage, but there is signal on EE, then your phone will automatically connect through EE instead.
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