Author Topic: Slieve Foye  (Read 910 times)

henryb

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1223
Slieve Foye
« on: 16:02:39, 24/09/17 »
With weather forecasters thick cloud, strong winds and zero visibility I decided not to walk the Mournes this week-end. So I've decided to post photos of my favourite Irish walk instead: Slieve Foye. Slieve Foye is the highest mountain in county Louth, the smallest county of Ireland. It is just over 500 metres but offers views better than most mountains 300/400 metres higher. I had to climb the mountain three times before getting a clear day. When that happened, the views across Carlingford Lough to the Mournes became my all time favourite panorama before climbing Bowfell in the Lake district.


Kilbroney forest and Carlingford Lough taken on the ascent:
Image may contain: sky, ocean, mountain, cloud, outdoor, nature and water


Retrospective view of the southern Mournes from Slieve Foye:
Image may contain: sky, ocean, mountain, cloud, outdoor, nature and water


Slievemartin round, Eagle group, Binnians from Slieve Foye:
Image may contain: sky, mountain, ocean, outdoor and nature


Southern and western Mournes from Slieve Foye:
Image may contain: sky, mountain, cloud, ocean, outdoor and nature


Carlingford village and county Down across Carlingford Lough:
Image may contain: sky, ocean, mountain, cloud, outdoor, nature and water


The Mournes from Slieve Foye across Carlingford Lough:
Image may contain: sky, mountain, cloud, nature and outdoor


Zoom-in on Knockchree and Knochshee from Slieve Foye:
Image may contain: sky, mountain, outdoor and nature


Barnavave:
Image may contain: mountain, sky, cloud, outdoor and nature


Dundalk bay:
Image may contain: cloud, sky, mountain, outdoor and nature

Mullen

  • New Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2
Re: Slieve Foye
« Reply #1 on: 11:56:33, 25/09/17 »
Hi, your photos look amazing. I've only taking up walking and I hope to catch some of those views myself.
You mention the lake district. I'm heading over their at the end of October, so hopefully I can experience some spectacular landscapes.
Is bowfell a hard climb for a novice?

adalard

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1101
Re: Slieve Foye
« Reply #2 on: 17:47:14, 25/09/17 »
Lovely photos as always, Henry.  O0


That ridge of Barnavave looks like it would make for a cracking walk.

Penygadair

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 880
Re: Slieve Foye
« Reply #3 on: 17:29:11, 26/09/17 »
I'm really pleased you posted this Henry. My late eldest brother-in-law used to walk in the Mournes but more often on the south side of Carlingford Lough in the RoI. He told me that the views from on high were unmissable and we made arrangements for a walk together.
Somehow that got translated into a family trip on his boat from Dromod along the Shannon and the Boyle Canal. The walk was postponed for another year during which time he sadly died. Therefore I'm overjoyed to see these particular pics. Many thanks for posting.

April

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5351
Re: Slieve Foye
« Reply #4 on: 19:09:36, 27/09/17 »
Lovely pics as always Henry  O0
"Who would've thought...... you are light and darkness coming through" words by Tim Armstrong

Ridge

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5837
Re: Slieve Foye
« Reply #5 on: 19:11:56, 27/09/17 »
Great photo Henry, you sure you didn't borrow Beefy's drone.
Over hill, over dale. Thorough brush, thorough brier....
I do wander every where

henryb

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1223
Re: Slieve Foye
« Reply #6 on: 18:36:22, 28/09/17 »
Thanks for replies everyone.


@ Mullen - I've done Bowfell once from Old Dungeon Ghyll in Great Langdale. I started walking at 10.30am and reached the summit at 1 or 1.30pm including a lunch break at three tarns. It is the 6th highest in the Lakes, over 900 metres. It isn't the hardest walk but it is a mountain which should not be underestimated. I would recommend doing easier walks to start with and building up fitness levels. I did that in the Mournes 9 years ago. For example - Loughrigg Fell from Skelwith Bridge firstly; Lingmoor fell from ODG or Elterwater secondly. Harrison Stickle from ODG thirdly. Thereafter, tackle Bowfell. Each walk in that order will gradually increase the height each time and you will see Bowfell from each summit, weather permitting. On a clear day, Bowfell's views are magnificient. Hope this helps, Henry :)