Author Topic: Pennine Way Winter Gear List  (Read 1743 times)

Another_Smith

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Re: Pennine Way Winter Gear List
« Reply #15 on: 07:47:10, 13/10/17 »
I could never find a way of filling a 65L bag, at my age I do not think I could carry it. The largest bag for me is 50L, it was big enough when I first started hiking but nowadays I can't even fill my latest 48L. I reckon I could easily get away with 45L but just not prepared to spend out again. I'm not an expert but I cut down stuff and weight every year. At my limit now I think?


Wow that's really put things into perspective. I didn't think I could get the volume of equipment down enough with everything for winter camping, which is the reason for the larger capacity bag. I do actually have an Arcteryx Alpha FL 45 bag which is minimalist as hell and weighs only 675g but doesn't have the suspension system for this kind of load hauling in my mind. In the summer I may have considered this and cut back on layers, swap tent for bivvy, lighter sleeping bag etc.
Water wise though I would like to carry 3 or 4 liters with me at times and only refill once a day.


As far as age and size goes I'm 29, 6 foot and built to haul gear which is probably why I'm not scrimping on weight as much as I could, I know I can carry decent loads but for 2 weeks straight......maybe your right and I'm over gearing because I can and not because I need to.


Some really useful info coming in from you guys thank you very much!

bricam2096

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Re: Pennine Way Winter Gear List
« Reply #16 on: 08:39:20, 13/10/17 »
I know everyone is different but 3-4 litres sounds a bit much, especially in March when you won't overheat as much as you would in the Summer.

Personally, I'd be planning to top up along the route at shops ( because I don't have a filter) and maybe take 2 litres.

2 litres less is quite a weight reduction.
LDWs done - 21 in total including 9 National Trails and 3 C2C

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Jac

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Re: Pennine Way Winter Gear List
« Reply #17 on: 08:45:25, 13/10/17 »
Note that you haven't included any First Aid items. I carry plasters/small roll micropore with non adhesive dressing which can be cut to size, ibruprofen, antiseptic wipes in individual sachets, 1 sachet rehydration powder and Compeed blister plasters. Hopefully, you won't need any of them and anything this can't cope would probably need outside help.

I also think that carrying 8 litres of water (= 8 Kgs) is over the top. A sawyer filter seems to be favourite with the LDWs here. A drought on the Pennines in March is unlikely - but you could be lucky/unlucky.

 
« Last Edit: 12:08:37, 13/10/17 by Jac »
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fernman

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Re: Pennine Way Winter Gear List
« Reply #18 on: 08:57:40, 13/10/17 »
Personally I don't see the need to carry all that water with you. A litre of water weighs a kilo, even if you do manage carrying weights well. Having only one fully functioning kidney I have to drink larger quantities than most, but I never carry more than 1 litre when on a multiple-day walk.

My walks are always in Snowdonia, maybe there's more water for refills available there than along the Penine Way, I really don't know? Even in near-drought occasions I've always found enough.

I carry it in a Nalgene Cantene collapsible bottle, much lighter than the solid one, and I make it safe with a Steripen Adventurer.  When I stop for the night I fill a 5L folding water carrier like the one shown below from eBay. They fold in three vertically, weigh little, and can be slid down inside your sack. Just had to replace one, though, as it developed a leak and would empty itself overnight. That is enough for drinks (I have 500ml of energy drinks, from powder, evening and morning), water for freeze-dried food, powdered milk, coffee, and for washing myself.

 
« Last Edit: 09:02:30, 13/10/17 by fernman »

Owen

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Re: Pennine Way Winter Gear List
« Reply #19 on: 10:26:05, 13/10/17 »
A soft shell and a fleece.
A thin and thick insulated jacket.
A light and thick base layer.


That's quite a bit of duplication, wouldn't having layers that can be put on one on top of another be more flexible?


Scarpa Mantras, their heavy winter boots, are you expecting to have to wear crampons?

Another_Smith

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Re: Pennine Way Winter Gear List
« Reply #20 on: 11:17:12, 13/10/17 »
A soft shell and a fleece.
A thin and thick insulated jacket.
A light and thick base layer.


That's quite a bit of duplication, wouldn't having layers that can be put on one on top of another be more flexible?


Scarpa Mantras, their heavy winter boots, are you expecting to have to wear crampons?


I love the Mantas personally despite the weight and wear them anytime other than summer days. They really are bomb proof, waterproof (With the gaiters too I should stay nice and dry) and now they're worn in so comfy, I don't see this as an issue. I may be a little out of my depth if I stumble into crampon territory but do have a set if you think it's going to be needed????  ;D


I'm glad you mentioned the layering though as this is something I need to work on over this winter, trying to find what I find comfortable at low temperatures/ high winds. I naturally run quite hot and to be honest I don't know if I'll need the thick insulating layer, a baselayer and this and I'm super toasty but I was thinking more for when I stop and in the evening, do you think this is overkill (800FP Goose Down)? As far as the other layers go I'll be taking 2 base layers anyway and changing daily so decided on one thicker than the other, the fleece and softshell are both thin and work very well together for warmth and wind resistance, plus the thin insulating layer is so light and is also my pillow as it stuffs into its inside pocket and is perfectly sized.


I'll look at dropping that thicker down jacket as, 4 nights around Snowdonia coming up in November so I'll see if it's needless weight. But as my pack weight is looking to be around 12kg right now is 500g really that much more to carry to be snug in the evening, in case of potential snow, cozy when you knock out a cuppa at lunch? 

Owen

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Re: Pennine Way Winter Gear List
« Reply #21 on: 16:06:14, 13/10/17 »
Down is fantastic for high Alpine/Arctic type weather conditions i.e. well below freezing all the time, when any moisture in the air will be snow/ice crystals. Such conditions seldom last for more than a couple of days in the UK, unfortunately. It's also unlikely to be that cold, wet and windy is much more likely. I do have a down jacket but can't remember the last time I wore it here, it only come out for skiing holidays. Down is also a bu**er to keep clean whereas primaloft can just be bunged in the washing machine.


My point about the boots was that you're very unlikely to need crampons on the PW even in March so why use heavy stiff boots designed for winter and lots of cramponing. You could use something a third of the weight which would be far more comfortable and less tiring.


I wrote a blog about what I took to Arctic Sweden in the summer http://donthaveone-owen.blogspot.co.uk/2017/06/what-im-taking-to-sarek.html In the end I actually took a different tent but everything else is what I would use for any trip here in the UK. I carried 15 days food and gas because sarek is a wilderness area so no re-supply, as others have said the PW isn't a wilderness so you could just buy food as you go. 

gunwharfman

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Re: Pennine Way Winter Gear List
« Reply #22 on: 17:37:11, 13/10/17 »
Thanks Owen Re: down jacket. Helps me to believe that me choosing synthetic was not a bad move. As regards water, I carry a bladder in my rucksack and I'm a water sipper. I have a small cup on the back of my bag to have a guzzle when the opportunity presents itself. I also carry a simple water filter (just a 6"plastic tube) as a back up.

NeilC

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Re: Pennine Way Winter Gear List
« Reply #23 on: 21:50:18, 14/10/17 »
Crikey some of you guys spend a lot of money on kit! I'm thinking my list is more like Karrimor fleece, Aldi thermals, Decathlon rucksack, ebay stove LOL


In terms of insulation. I don't know about you but I can rarely walk in anything more than a baselayer fleece and waterproof/windproof, even in snow. The down jacket only comes out in camp and doubles as part of my pillow filling. My last winter jaunt, albeit only a weekender in snowy Dartmoor conditions had me in a merino top, a thin microfleece, a standard cheapo fleece maybe 200gsm and shell with down for camp. I was cold but only hands and feet at times. I can never get gloves right. Are people actually walking in insulated jackets in UK winter? Actually, does March count as winter?

gunwharfman

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Re: Pennine Way Winter Gear List
« Reply #24 on: 21:53:47, 14/10/17 »
Like me! When I'm hiking, no real problems, stopping is the problem, it's then that I start to feel cold.

Another_Smith

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Re: Pennine Way Winter Gear List
« Reply #25 on: 09:37:50, 16/10/17 »
Well a smaller lighter bag (Osprey atmos 65 AG, by far the comfiest thing to ever grace my back), lighter boots (Salomon Quest 4D 2 GTX, again super comfy straight from the box when I tried them and a ton lighter than the Manta pros), new gps (Garmin GPSMAP 64s) , safety essentials and a sawyer water filter are all on order for delivery this week so thank you (My bank however does not!  ;D ).


Insulation has been mentioned numerous times here and I've always been warm enough in just the lightweight synthetic rab xenon hoodie that's also my pillow, I was just over preparing for going 'up north' being a midlander. I do sometimes wear that insulating layer in winter whilst walking and have used it a few times whilst snowboarding but its only ever a baselayer, that and maybe a hardshell depending on the conditions. It breathes well, dries quick and is light as a feather so just replace any kind of fleece mid-layer for this.





motorlaunch

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Re: Pennine Way Winter Gear List
« Reply #26 on: 11:49:31, 16/10/17 »
Your kit list didn't mention overtrousers. Rain is definitely a possibility in March. Also if you are intent on carrying 14 days food. What is your daily food plan.

gunwharfman

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Re: Pennine Way Winter Gear List
« Reply #27 on: 12:14:24, 16/10/17 »
I'm a lazy foodie, always carry the minium, Wraps, nuts, chicken bars, always eat properly in the nearest pub or restaurant. Sometimes I've been known to carry a tin of creamy rice or custard to eat 'at the top' but that's my only vice.


I had a pair of Ospreys as well, super comfy as you say but unfortunately mine leaked!

Another_Smith

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Re: Pennine Way Winter Gear List
« Reply #28 on: 12:23:47, 16/10/17 »
Your kit list didn't mention overtrousers. Rain is definitely a possibility in March. Also if you are intent on carrying 14 days food. What is your daily food plan.


I'm still unsure if I should carry around 4/5 days food with me and resupply along the way from local towns or to try the full stretch with whats in my bag. Still need a bit of time to think on this one as I initially wanted to try this with only whats in my pack.


Over trousers will be coming with me but you're right I forgot them from that list, I just got some very lightweight pac-a-mac style ones I throw over my other trousers when its hoofing it down. Only usually needed in hard driving rain as the others are pretty water resistant and what I usually wear Snowboarding.



gunwharfman

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Re: Pennine Way Winter Gear List
« Reply #29 on: 12:35:08, 16/10/17 »
Sometimes when I watch westerns I often think would it be better if rain jackets were designed with an attachable 'skirt', because I dislike waterproof trousers intensely, such a faff!! I use a rain skirt at the moment which  personally prefer.