Author Topic: TR - The Bannisdale Horseshoe  (Read 396 times)

- Dave -

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« Last Edit: 20:27:54, 26/02/18 by - Dave - »
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photonut

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Re: TR - The Bannisdale Horseshoe
« Reply #1 on: 09:14:50, 27/02/18 »
 Looks like a really nice walk.  Enjoyed your report - a real shame when the views are obscured by cloud :(

- Dave -

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Re: TR - The Bannisdale Horseshoe
« Reply #2 on: 16:17:51, 27/02/18 »
Yes, made it a bit 'samey'. I'd be interested to hear from others who have done this walk whether they think the gravel is a deliberate ploy to stop people parking? That was certainly the impression I got.
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April

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Re: TR - The Bannisdale Horseshoe
« Reply #3 on: 18:51:35, 28/02/18 »
Interesting report Dave  O0 I don't know this area so I don't know about the farmer/gravel stuff  :-\

The all knowing Karl has been this way though, he might have a few answers  :)

I'm wondering why The Forest is called The Forest?  :D  There's nowt like a little bit of a trespass to get the day started  :)
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Welsh Rambler

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Re: TR - The Bannisdale Horseshoe
« Reply #4 on: 21:13:24, 28/02/18 »
Enjoyable TR Dave, thanks for sharing  O0


Innovative stile over the fence  :)


Regards Keith

- Dave -

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Re: TR - The Bannisdale Horseshoe
« Reply #5 on: 21:29:56, 28/02/18 »
You probably know this but technically a forest doesn't have to have trees to be termed 'a forest'. From wiki:


Although a forest is usually defined by the presence of trees, under many definitions an area completely lacking trees may still be considered a forest if it grew trees in the past, will grow trees in the future,[/font][/size] or was legally designated as a forest regardless of vegetation type[/font][/size]

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I was also lead to believe the following:


The term [/font][/size]forest[/font][/size] in the ordinary modern understanding refers to an area of wooded land; however, the original medieval sense was closer to the modern idea of a "preserve" i.e. land legally set aside for specific purposes such as royal hunting with less emphasis on its composition[/font][/size]

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Looking at the map, The Forest doesn't actually mark the summit, rather and area of the eastern flank. Presumably the fell top has been associated with this as many usually are. Presumably the area was either forested, will be forested in the future or was associated with hunting
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