Author Topic: Bull Run - What do you do.  (Read 454 times)

nesty

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Bull Run - What do you do.
« on: 13:38:32, 30/10/17 »
When I was in the Mendips. I was walking through this field then all of a sudden,  I was confronted by a bull. Him and me doing the stand off.

I didn't know what to do, as never read up on it!

I slowly just back walked keeping eyeline and the bull just watched me and let me retreat.

Later on googled it and what I did was correct

Anyone else been confronted like this with a Bull?


gunwharfman

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Re: Bull Run - What do you do.
« Reply #1 on: 15:17:51, 30/10/17 »
No, just cows! I remember on the Coast to Coast standing with a group pf people from the UK, USA, Europe and the Far East who were all fascinated by the efforts of a bull to mount a cow. He was having a hard time but when he finally achieved his goal he got a big cheer and wild hand claps from his audience!

BuzyG

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Re: Bull Run - What do you do.
« Reply #2 on: 18:08:22, 30/10/17 »
I have met plenty of Bulls up on the moors.  Even when they are in with there harem, they are not really interested in what we are up to.  Far more important things to worry about.  I work on the principal that, although most Bull's have been conditioned to be fearful of man, they are bigger than me, faster than me and have better weapons than me.  So I don't worry about them even when suddenly confronted in fog.  But I do shown them due respect and walk around.  O0

Murphy

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Re: Bull Run - What do you do.
« Reply #3 on: 18:45:46, 30/10/17 »
Contrary to BuzyG, oh yes I have. On one occasion it had escaped from its field and was on the path up from Keld waterfalls - I backed up slowly, made good my escape and contacted the farmer who immediately rounded it up on his quad and all was fine.  Another occasion on Pennine Way around Hadrians Wall I was charged by bull, his harem and all.......sadly I was injured quite badly as I had to dive for cover over a dry stone wall causing it to fall on my face and tearing my leg on barbed wire.  Cattle of the female variety have caused other issues over the years  and most recently my friend was charged by a cow knocking him to the ground - he would have been trampled had he not taken evasive action by kicking hard in the face and making good his escape.  All reported to appropriate authorities and dealt with accordingly.....Seems I've had my fair share of issues with cattle both male and female.

pauldawes

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Re: Bull Run - What do you do.
« Reply #4 on: 08:49:39, 31/10/17 »
Contrary to BuzyG, oh yes I have. On one occasion it had escaped from its field and was on the path up from Keld waterfalls - I backed up slowly, made good my escape and contacted the farmer who immediately rounded it up on his quad and all was fine.  Another occasion on Pennine Way around Hadrians Wall I was charged by bull, his harem and all.......sadly I was injured quite badly as I had to dive for cover over a dry stone wall causing it to fall on my face and tearing my leg on barbed wire.  Cattle of the female variety have caused other issues over the years  and most recently my friend was charged by a cow knocking him to the ground - he would have been trampled had he not taken evasive action by kicking hard in the face and making good his escape.  All reported to appropriate authorities and dealt with accordingly.....Seems I've had my fair share of issues with cattle both male and female.


More than “your share”.


But it does happen, certainly I’m wary of any large farm animal. One of my nephews and one of his lads work in farming, and both share the same bias: “be wary of any large farm animal you don’t know well”.

Dyffryn Ardudwy

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Re: Bull Run - What do you do.
« Reply #5 on: 09:48:41, 31/10/17 »
I had to pass one, a few weeks ago, whilst walking towards Cwm Nantcol, from Dyffryn.
It had seen me, and kept looking at me for several minutes as i approached, but i managed to clamber over a nearby wall, to escape getting any nearer.

Ive not encountered many Bulls, but its not something i wish to repeat too often.

Doddy

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Re: Bull Run - What do you do.
« Reply #6 on: 10:52:43, 31/10/17 »

I have two bull stories. Once I was faced with a group of cows at a stile facing away from me. I thought as a country lad I can sort this out; so I slapped the nearest one on the backside; it turned around and looked at me. I realised my mistake as I saw the bulls face. They did move sufficiently and I was over the stile faster than Colin Jackson the hurdler.
Secondly I was slightly off track and faced with a fence. The only problem was two bulls with attendant cows were facing each other over the fence; the bulls taking it in turns to bellow at each other and look at me. The detour was long so I braved it and went over the fence again rather quickly not looking back.

ninthace

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Re: Bull Run - What do you do.
« Reply #7 on: 12:56:33, 31/10/17 »
I have encountered solitary bulls on more than one occasion on the Pennine Way and surrounding footpaths in Upper Teesdale but we usually ignored each other. On one trip I was heading over the moor NE from Cow Green reservoir and found the only gate through the intake wall blocked by cows and calves. I pushed my way through to get to the gate only to find the big “cow” by the gate had only one “udder”. We bade each other good morning and I slipped through the gate sharpish. I think he had his mind on other things to be fair.
Solvitur Ambulando

barewirewalker

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Re: Bull Run - What do you do.
« Reply #8 on: 14:22:33, 31/10/17 »
I grew up on a farm, where there were pedigree Ayrshire cows and the Ayrshire bull is one of the dairy breeds that are not allowed in fields with public access. I do not think I ever had any trouble with these bulls, I often had the job of feeding in the yards etc. but I went to boarding school at a tender young age. The school, occupying an old manorial type building, set on a hill and was adjacent to a farm, the fields surrounded the school playing fields and this was where I first came across a truly terrifying bull. It was a dairy Friesian and if a ball went out of play and landed in the surrounding agricultural pastures it was a life or death dash to retrieve it.


Through 2 decades of a farming career I do not think I have been overly troubled by a number of bulls of different breeds, but the Farmer Owen's bull was in a league of his own. A later met the son of farmer Owen, as a dealer in straw and other agricultural products, when I learnt of his home, I mentioned this bull and he confirmed it that it terrorised  all who had any dealing with it.


Only a few years ago I met someone around my age, who had grown up in the village near my old school, he had gone to the village school, which was at the bottom of the hill. The school play ground was dug into the hillside, a fence was at the top of the wall, formed by this excavation and farmer Owen's field was on the other side. We soon got to reminisce about the notoriously fierce bull and I learnt that some years prior to his year, the elder pupils at the school had taken to using the bulls rather magnificent scrotal sack as a catapult target, as it was often presented to them dangling at 11 to 2 o'clock high above the school playground.


It is perhaps not surprising that this animal had a vendetta out for humanoids large or small. though it has taken some sixty or so years to find out the real reason for the ill humour of this poor animal.
BWW
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