Author Topic: Baselayer question  (Read 800 times)

fernman

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Baselayer question
« on: 19:21:00, 02/11/17 »
There are very many brands and models of baselayer tops and longjohns on makers' and sellers' websites but what is not clear to me at all is whether they differ much in the amount of extra warmth they provide. Occasionally some are described as for active wear, but that's as far as it goes.

Mine are years-old synthetic ones from Snow+Rock. I take them backpacking but as my trips are always in May and September I generally only need them as sleepwear and if it's cold in the morning I keep them on under my clothes until I set off. (TBH their main use is for my day walks between autumn and spring when the temperature is lower than 11-12C.)

In my never-ending quest to lessen my backpack weight I've figured I could replace them with lighter ones to save about 200g / 7oz.

However, I'm otherwise happy with the ones I have, they are "the devil I know", and I'm a bit wary of shelling out £70+ for something that might not perform as adequately as them.

Over to you!


lostme1

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Re: Baselayer question
« Reply #1 on: 20:14:23, 02/11/17 »
I have recently purchase merino wool baselayers from aldi. This is the mens version.

https://www.aldi.co.uk/men%27s-merino-base-layer-top/p/078320164600700

Wool doesn't get smelly and can hold up to 30% of its weight in water without feeling well. Really comfortable to wear. Only weighs 115g and warmth to weight ratio is excellent.

For some of the technical information about wool. When wool absorbs moisture, it produces heat, so if you go from a warm room into a cold, damp night wearing a wool jersey, the wool picks up water vapour from the air, keeping you warm. The reverse occurs when you go back into the warm room – the moisture in your jersey passes into the atmosphere, cooling you down. Tiny pores in the cuticle cells allow water vapour to pass through the wool fibre. This makes wool comfortable to wear in both warm and cool conditions.

I got my first ones 18 months ago and and was so pleased with them when they came on offer I got some more as they are excellent value for money and great to wear.
These boots are made for walking.... so long as the rest of my body agrees

NeilC

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Re: Baselayer question
« Reply #2 on: 20:17:31, 02/11/17 »
Personally I can't tell much difference in warmth between £70 ones and £7 ones.


difference classes of fibre make a difference to me. Ie merino has different properties to polyester or polypropylene etc.


I hear good things about the Brynje string/mesh ones. I imagine they're pretty light.

Owen

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Re: Baselayer question
« Reply #3 on: 20:47:21, 02/11/17 »


I hear good things about the Brynje string/mesh ones. I imagine they're pretty light.


Also expensive.

NeilC

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Re: Baselayer question
« Reply #4 on: 00:33:08, 03/11/17 »

Also expensive.


Very. I wouldn't bother myself but others spend a lot on their kit.

Dyffryn Ardudwy

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Re: Baselayer question
« Reply #5 on: 10:38:03, 03/11/17 »
When its really chilly, ive alway's found either my short sleeve or long sleeve Helly Hansen lifa thermal, does the trick.
The Thermal layer market, is flooded with some very overpriced tops, but ive found that my Helly Hansen thermals to be very effective.

Their very long lasting as well, so the initial purchase price represents good value.

You could of course buy any of the equally fine layered thermals, but some of them are way too expensive.

For those chilly Autumn and Winter days, a Helly Hansen, Buffalo Windshirt, and either windproof or lightweight waterproof top, seems to work for me.

The Pertex windshirt, keeps most of the wind at bay, and is highly breathable, allowing the thermal properties of the thermal top to keep most of your body heat inside.

If it gets particularly windy, then the extra layer waterproof goes on top.

I am sure many here on this forum, will have their own preference, but the Helly Hansen thermals, are a tried and trusted formula, and do not cost the earth.

sussamb

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Re: Baselayer question
« Reply #6 on: 11:05:12, 03/11/17 »



For those chilly Autumn and Winter days, a Helly Hansen, Buffalo Windshirt, and either windproof or lightweight waterproof top, seems to work for me.

Surely not now you have the Montane down jacket?
« Last Edit: 11:08:38, 03/11/17 by sussamb »
Where there's a will ...

jimbob

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Re: Baselayer question
« Reply #7 on: 13:41:39, 03/11/17 »
Quote
Surely not now you have the Montane down jacket?

which was made in China from live plucked geese. ;D
Too little, too late, too bad......

Dyffryn Ardudwy

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Re: Baselayer question
« Reply #8 on: 17:47:26, 03/11/17 »
Ive already got a few thermal tops, might as well make use of them.
Probably the ideal base layer to go under the down jacket, but as the Montane is very light weight,  it will need an extra layer underneath in really cold weather.
Still, it was well worth the £40 i paid for it, and can also be used as a casual jacket when its chilly, and no the down was not cruelly sourced.
There would be serious repercussions if a company like Montane, claimed their down was ethically sourced, when it was far from the truth.

They clearly state the fact, in their advertising, and they would be on rocky ground if someone disproved it.


Montane are part of the RDS group, which stands for Responsible Down Standard, ensuring that the down is sourced from an ethical source.

They would be far better just keeping quiet on the subject, but in this instance, they are proud to say their part of the RDS.


Another good reason to purchase Montane clothing.
« Last Edit: 17:57:02, 03/11/17 by Dyffryn Ardudwy »

sussamb

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Re: Baselayer question
« Reply #9 on: 18:06:54, 03/11/17 »
Ive already got a few thermal tops, might as well make use of them.

On that basis I expect you'll be wearing 4 pertex hoods next time you're out then  O0
Where there's a will ...

Dyffryn Ardudwy

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Re: Baselayer question
« Reply #10 on: 18:08:40, 03/11/17 »
Only one needed

jimbob

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Re: Baselayer question
« Reply #11 on: 18:30:51, 03/11/17 »
Volkswagen, Kobo Steel et al are all supposedly ethical companies are they not, just look what happened there, the list grows daily. The bottom line is unless your UK inspectors are standing in the factories in China you have absolutely no way of knowing where the down is coming from. You will be shown what you want to see when visiting for inspection purposes but once your back is turned??????.

On 20 Jukly 2017 the following was reported " After a shocking recent PETA US and PETA Asia eyewitness investigation revealed that even so-called “responsibly sourced” down may be linked to suppliers that use live plucking to obtain feathers, brands have been rushing to distance themselves from this unethical product."

Or you may be interested uin reading the following article from May2017. https://www.ukclimbing.com/news/press.php?id=5183

from which the following quote is most apt "
 So you can't 100% guarantee your down is ethically sourced?  RT: No, The Down Codex Project is all about risk management. No brand can currently give a 100% cast iron guarantee. There are too many small farms and slaughter houses in the supply chain. "
Too little, too late, too bad......

Mel

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Re: Baselayer question
« Reply #12 on: 19:08:06, 03/11/17 »
I find SportsDirect cheapo 2 for a tenner type deal synthetic thermal baselayers surprisingly warm under a fleece.  I've even worn their thermal legs under my summer trousers in the depths of winter in a biting coastal North Easterly blizzard/wind and not felt cold.  Not sure what they'd be like as jimjams though  :-\
No expense spared in pursuit of a bargain ;)

fernman

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Re: Baselayer question
« Reply #13 on: 20:09:43, 03/11/17 »
It's high time I stepped in to thank everyone for their input so far.

lostme1: That is an incredibly low price for Merino wool and a good light weight too. Unfortunately it's a short-sleeved top when I want long sleeves (I hadn't thought to mention that before), also there are no longjohns to go with it either. Nevertheless, I will now be keeping a close eye on what Aldi might offer in the coming months.

NeilC: I'm afraid anything expensive like Brynje is going to be off my list (I don't want to look like Rab C. Nesbitt either!).

Dai: I looked up Helly Hansen baselayers but I couldn't find any weights, I also got the impression the Lifa 120 is not part of their current range.

Mel: Spots Direct have some amazingly cheap ones, but again, no weights.

I must reiterate two main points:
1. I am seeking, or at least thinking of, halving the weight of my present baselayers, which are otherwise quite satisfactory.
2. I am trying to learn if there is much difference in warmth/performance in the different weights that are available in  products. Manufacturers and sellers could help by saying This model is good for runners/cyclists and this one is good for static people like anglers/birdwatchers, but they don't, they're rather vague, probably deliberately, and descriptions, if any, cast as wide a net as possible.
« Last Edit: 20:14:38, 03/11/17 by fernman »

Colliewobbles

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Re: Baselayer question
« Reply #14 on: 21:53:18, 03/11/17 »
Check out the Helly Hansen “Kastrup” base layers in Screwfix - still a variation of their Lifa fabric but relatively speaking ‘cheap as chips’.