Author Topic: Boggy soggy ground - what to do?  (Read 3217 times)

Oldtramp

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Re: Boggy soggy ground - what to do?
« Reply #30 on: 10:24:14, 13/12/17 »
Remember the old adage 'Where rushes grow a man may go'. 


Look for the clumps of rushes --- brown tipped green round stems, 2 foot tall, -- and step lightly onto the centres of these.  You'll always be safe.


Otherwise trekking poles are good for testing if there's a firm bottom.





gunwharfman

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Re: Boggy soggy ground - what to do?
« Reply #31 on: 13:39:14, 13/12/17 »
Same as me, look for the clumps, and activly plot your route across. I grew up on a farm in Kent, the way to get across boggy grass fields, look for the clumps.

sussamb

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Re: Boggy soggy ground - what to do?
« Reply #32 on: 14:02:05, 13/12/17 »
 O0 O0 O0
Where there's a will ...

BuzyG

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Re: Boggy soggy ground - what to do?
« Reply #33 on: 16:48:30, 13/12/17 »
to get across boggy grass fields, look for the clumps.


Tussocks to that.  ;)

Strider

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Re: Boggy soggy ground - what to do?
« Reply #34 on: 17:28:26, 13/12/17 »
Yes, as others have said, step on the grass clumps and reeds and avoid stepping on moss.  Wading through and hoping is likely to end badly.

The best method of navigating a bog, however,  is to let someone else go first........  ;)
Not all those who wander are lost

adalard

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Re: Boggy soggy ground - what to do?
« Reply #35 on: 18:41:40, 13/12/17 »
The best method of navigating a bog, however,  is to let someone else go first........  ;)


 ;D

Mel

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Re: Boggy soggy ground - what to do?
« Reply #36 on: 19:06:12, 13/12/17 »
Otherwise trekking poles are good for testing if there's a firm bottom.


... and getting a slap across the face  :D
No expense spared in pursuit of a bargain ;)
https://snailspacewalks.blogspot.co.uk/

Mel

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Re: Boggy soggy ground - what to do?
« Reply #37 on: 19:06:59, 13/12/17 »
The best method of navigating a bog, however,  is to let someone else go first........  ;)


Good man.  Nice of you to offer Strider  ;)
No expense spared in pursuit of a bargain ;)
https://snailspacewalks.blogspot.co.uk/

Oldtramp

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Re: Boggy soggy ground - what to do?
« Reply #38 on: 19:30:50, 13/12/17 »
The best method of navigating a bog, however,  is to let someone else go first........ 


The hazard with that is that there's a terrible tendency to follow the man in front and then, when you're half way across, you realise he hasn't the slightest idea about navigating bogs and swamps .

Strider

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Re: Boggy soggy ground - what to do?
« Reply #39 on: 01:25:05, 14/12/17 »

Good man.  Nice of you to offer Strider  ;)

I'm taller than most of my regular walking group, so they often let me go first on the grounds that if I disappear up to my eyebrows they've got no chance  :P

What they don't take into account is that I'm also lighter than most of them. Ha!
 
Not all those who wander are lost

BuzyG

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Re: Boggy soggy ground - what to do?
« Reply #40 on: 16:15:34, 14/12/17 »

... and getting a slap across the face  :D


 ;D ;D ;D

Doddy

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Re: Boggy soggy ground - what to do?
« Reply #41 on: 18:08:21, 21/12/17 »

In wet stuff I use bread wrappers in my trail runners with gaiters.  I have tried several Sealskin Goretex socks ; better for biking. I find they pinch the toes as they are so strong but keep the feet warm
I do tussock jump and the plants a poster said look like chives are often the Tussock sedge, Carex sp.

nesty

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Re: Boggy soggy ground - what to do?
« Reply #42 on: 14:28:54, 30/12/17 »
When in the peak district in Oct I went a bit off piste. The ground started getting boggy.
Did the tuff jumps, when I could. However one piece looked firm and placed my foot down and then my leg disappeared down into the bog to my knee.
Lucky was able to step up on to a tuff with use of walking poles and raise my leg out. As I was wearing the Arcteryx Boras, no water could get in to the inner boot, though was one foot squelching back to the campsite.
Boggy ground is a real hazard that many people don't take on board, especially solo walking. I am certainly more on the look out for it now!
I want to do forest of Bowland in 2018. However, the hazard of boggy ground, could present a issue doing it solo!

Peak District Pete

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Re: Boggy soggy ground - what to do?
« Reply #43 on: 16:09:52, 30/12/17 »
I agree with most of the replies, hop from one clump of reeds to the next. I did this the other week walking between Higger Tor and Carl Wark in the Peak District. Half way across the bog I ran out of steam and landed between some clumps.

The result was I sunk upto my waist in a disgusting, smelly bit of bog.
I was wearing leather boots and overtrousers, so could take them off and clean to a certain extent.

We called at the Fox House Inn not long after, and had to sit by the door to finish our pints because people aready in there were screwing up their noses at the stink!!!  :o

harry_keogh

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Re: Boggy soggy ground - what to do?
« Reply #44 on: 11:29:07, 08/01/18 »
Being up to the knees in peat bog is all part of the fun in the Dark Peak  :)


Always wear good well waxed leather boots and gaiters. Haven't had wet feet for some time. Doesn't particularly bother me if they do get wet though, and have done the whole of the Welsh 3000s before with wet socks.