Author Topic: Dogs - how to deal with unaccompanied dogs?  (Read 2544 times)

tonyk

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Re: Dogs - how to deal with unaccompanied dogs?
« Reply #30 on: 15:12:40, 10/01/18 »
I'm so sorry ... I didnt mean to start a debate ... I was only asking whether there was a better course of action I should have taken when faced with several unaccompanied dogs running toward me across a field barking.

I think if it happens again (and I hope it dosent) I'll probably do the same - turn and walk swiftly away.
It is however unsettling to hear that it seems not uncommon to have problems with dogs.



 Next time walk slowly backwards,raise your hands above your head and if they get too close roar back at them.Running fast with your back to them makes you look like prey.The majority of predators attack from behind and will rarely attack face to face.Sometimes the dog won't get the message so the best thing to do is to kick it as hard as possible in the flanks until it squeals in pain.If you fall on the floor the dog will try and get to your head so use your feet to ward it off. Dave Turton 9th dan,who is one of the most experienced unarmed combat instructors in Europe,covered this topic in an article many years ago but the article was withdrawn after he got hate mail from animal rights cranks.

barewirewalker

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Re: Dogs - how to deal with unaccompanied dogs?
« Reply #31 on: 17:23:54, 10/01/18 »
I'm so sorry ... I didnt mean to start a debate ...


Do not apologise Roger, it should be I doing that, I think you have plenty of advice to your real question, the virtual question that hangs in the air when this subject gets discussed here always manages to shake out a few lines of interesting debate, which tends to make this forum both friendly and interesting. The link I provided may be quite nostalgic for some of the older members, contribution from members passed on or even away.


If I hunt back I might find the topic or post, where I mentioned being fanged in the left buttock by a one eyed, three legged collie in a Welsh farmyard, whilst being told by its owner that was a harmless fool of a dog, with ambitions of eating the postman's van or the tyres.
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lostme1

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Re: Dogs - how to deal with unaccompanied dogs?
« Reply #32 on: 17:30:03, 10/01/18 »

If I hunt back I might find the topic or post, where I mentioned being fanged in the left buttock by a one eyed, three legged collie in a Welsh farmyard, whilst being told by its owner that was a harmless fool of a dog, with ambitions of eating the postman's van or the tyres.

Looking forward to reading this post.

Om a more serious note in the 1980's I was chased across a field by 3 alsatian dogs.

I had walked passed the garden they were in and as I as walking across the field beside they were barking like mad. I thought OK they were just doing their job but as the barking got louder I turned round to find they had escaped and were chasing me across the field. Various thoughts went through my head at the time but all I could do was carry on walking as I did like the idea of making a stand on my own in open country.

They eventually gave up but later I saw a policeman and told him about the incident as it had scrared the hell out of me. Apparently I wasn't the first and he said he would speak to the owners.
« Last Edit: 17:40:05, 10/01/18 by lostme1 »
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Dyffryn Ardudwy

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Re: Dogs - how to deal with unaccompanied dogs?
« Reply #33 on: 17:31:45, 10/01/18 »
Who will ever forget that scene, in the gripping film "Bronson" where he fights these manic dogs, intent on tearing him to pieces.
An interesting book i used to own, but sadly went missing ages ago, recounts the activities in Rome's famous Colosseum, it was one of those magnificently written penguin paperbacks.
Afternoons entertainment following the mid day spectacle, of the torture of political prisoners and Christians, was to dress women and young children in animal costumes, so that large savage dogs could devour them.

Is it any wonder that mans best friend, can be a very unpredictable creature.
Dog aggression for some reason, is becoming an increasing problem in the UK, mostly due to the increased popularity of banned breeds, but responsibility clearly lies with the owner.

phil1960

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Re: Dogs - how to deal with unaccompanied dogs?
« Reply #34 on: 18:33:16, 10/01/18 »
Jeez this is turning into an anti dog thread slowly, some people have to tell everyone the same thing countless times, but hey we should be used to it. On the flip side Iíve never had a bad experience with dogs, maybe itís because Iím a responsible owner, maybe Iíve been lucky who knows. Of course there are bad owners and dangerous dogs, like there are bad owners of any animal and bad people too.
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Mel

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Re: Dogs - how to deal with unaccompanied dogs?
« Reply #35 on: 18:46:52, 10/01/18 »
I'm so sorry ... I didnt mean to start a debate ...


That, more recently, is one thing this forum excels itself in, whether intended or not  :(


.... shortly followed by it going (sometimes wildly) off topic .... usually  ::)




Back to your original question, not sure what I would do - I've only ever been chased once "many years ago".  Luckily I was on a push bike and could pedal much faster than the dogs could run!!  Still scary though and I do wonder what they would have actually done had I simply been walking or couldn't pedal fast enough  :-\

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pauldawes

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Re: Dogs - how to deal with unaccompanied dogs?
« Reply #36 on: 18:48:42, 10/01/18 »
Jeez this is turning into an anti dog thread slowly, some people have to tell everyone the same thing countless times, but hey we should be used to it. On the flip side Iíve never had a bad experience with dogs, maybe itís because Iím a responsible owner, maybe Iíve been lucky who knows. Of course there are bad owners and dangerous dogs, like there are bad owners of any animal and bad people too.


I donít think it has (turned into an anti-dog thread)..itís turned into an anti-badly behaved dog thread, with practically all of accepting that most of the bad behaviour is down to poor training.


How do you define a bad experience with a dog?


I ask because I suspect many dog owners define that as a fairly extreme incident..biting for example.


But for that size-able minority of people that donít like dogs, a bad experience may be an over-friendly dog jumping up and making contact..especially if that puts mud all over clean clothes. Or a dog making threatening growling sounds, etc.


If you really havenít seen stuff like that frequently Iím surprised.

phil1960

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Re: Dogs - how to deal with unaccompanied dogs?
« Reply #37 on: 19:03:00, 10/01/18 »

I donít think it has (turned into an anti-dog thread)..itís turned into an anti-badly behaved dog thread, with practically all of accepting that most of the bad behaviour is down to poor training. - I took the trouble to re read the whole thread and disagree with you, not a problem that's life.


How do you define a bad experience with a dog? - Why should I explain my own definition? I stated I haven't had a bad experience that's it.


I ask because I suspect many dog owners define that as a fairly extreme incident..biting for example. - You suspect? A bit of an assumption really.


But for that size-able minority of people that donít like dogs, a bad experience may be an over-friendly dog jumping up and making contact..especially if that puts mud all over clean clothes. Or a dog making threatening growling sounds, etc. - Now I do get this bit, not everyone likes dogs, even friendly placid ones jumping up however friendly they are, I do understand that, but I also find it a little difficult to associate that with being a bad experience, however we're all different so point taken there.


If you really havenít seen stuff like that frequently Iím surprised. - I don't recall saying I haven't seen stuff like that.
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Dyffryn Ardudwy

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Re: Dogs - how to deal with unaccompanied dogs?
« Reply #38 on: 19:19:17, 10/01/18 »
I recon a bad experience, is when your playing timidly with friends, and a very large Alsatian suddenly appears at speed, from the corner of your eye, and sinks its large jaws into your arm.
Even though it happened as far back as 1971, i can still visualise it happening, with the blood and totally unprovoked aggression shown by this dog.
I can even remember the dogs name,  Queenie.

I have the scars still plain to see on my left upper arm, to remind me.


Its no wonder i am afraid of large dogs, even those that obviously show no aggression, as really unpleasant past experiences stay with you for life.


I still find it difficult to pat or stroke a dog, even one on a lead that is obviously well trained and docile as anything.


Getting bitten by a dog, is something that lives long in ones memory, its not nice, and it hurts, and blimey is it scary.
« Last Edit: 19:27:27, 10/01/18 by Dyffryn Ardudwy »

phil1960

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Re: Dogs - how to deal with unaccompanied dogs?
« Reply #39 on: 19:27:59, 10/01/18 »
I certainly wouldnít disagree with the above as a bad experience, poor Queenie (just kidding)  ;)
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Dyffryn Ardudwy

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Re: Dogs - how to deal with unaccompanied dogs?
« Reply #40 on: 19:33:08, 10/01/18 »
Slightly off the subject (SORRY) i even remember where and when i was bitten viciously by a horse.
When animals show aggression, it somehow sticks long in ones memory.

phil1960

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Re: Dogs - how to deal with unaccompanied dogs?
« Reply #41 on: 19:34:38, 10/01/18 »
 ;D
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Dyffryn Ardudwy

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Re: Dogs - how to deal with unaccompanied dogs?
« Reply #42 on: 19:42:20, 10/01/18 »
I recon i must attract the curiosity of ill tempered beasts.
Four dogs have had a go at me, two of them with real intent in mind.

A large horse, in a field near my mothers old home in Llanfair PG on Anglesey, sinked its molars onto my right arm, not as painful as a dog bite, but still nasty.

A very large sow in an agricultural show in South Wales in the late 1970s, was in a show pen with several of its piglets.

Foolishly i put my hand ever too close, pointing to my mother at the lovely little piggies, the sow missed my hand by inches, THANK GOODNESS MUM PULLED MY HAND AWAY QUICKLY, i cannot imagine the consequences if my hand had remained there.

Is it any wonder i am timid with animals.

pauldawes

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Re: Dogs - how to deal with unaccompanied dogs?
« Reply #43 on: 19:46:27, 10/01/18 »
Slightly off the subject (SORRY) i even remember where and when i was bitten viciously by a horse.
When animals show aggression, it somehow sticks long in ones memory.


Most traumatic experiences stick long in the memory.


Itís most likely an evolutionary defence mechanicism to help to avoid really dangerous situations.


A similar example is any food eaten (or drink imbibed) just before a really serious bout of illness: itís hard to eat (or drink) the stuff again afterwards.

One minor example..I used to love pickled onions, but eat a few before a major bout of illness. Never been able to face eating one since. My logical mind knows the pickled onions had nothing to do with the illness, but my subconscious mind doenít agree.

Jac

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Re: Dogs - how to deal with unaccompanied dogs?
« Reply #44 on: 09:17:49, 11/01/18 »
Most traumatic experiences stick long in the memory.
Itís most likely an evolutionary defence mechanicism to help to avoid really dangerous situations.

A similar example is any food eaten (or drink imbibed) just before a really serious bout of illness: itís hard to eat (or drink) the stuff again afterwards.

Agreed, I couldn't drink gin for nearly fifty years  :(
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