Author Topic: Farewell old pal. A moral dilemma  (Read 4837 times)

Addingham

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Re: Farewell old pal. A moral dilemma
« Reply #15 on: 01:59:19, 23/01/18 »
At what point do we decide a dog is "too old", today, tomorrow or the next day?  Am I too old today, tomorrow or will I be too old the next day?  None of us know the full facts, why decisions are made and decisions are very easy with HINDSIGHT, and a knowledge of "IF ONLY.......", but all feel we are experts and know better than the poor chap who had to make an awful decision.......I took my dog on the fells, mountains, long distance walks right up until the day before he died, which happened to be at home.  Had it been the day before, he would have been in the hills,.  Not only was he elderly, he was blind, but only I can know whether I made the right decision to take him in the hills each day...all I know is he had many years of happy life doing what he loved the most....walking the hills and fells with me.  I know that if I had to make a decision like this poor chap, then from my armchair I really don't know what I would do and would only know at the time by being there.


Farewell old pal.Just going through this myself and sad Chippy RIP. I agree with your sentiment entirely.

Murphy

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Re: Farewell old pal. A moral dilemma
« Reply #16 on: 08:10:49, 23/01/18 »
I feel for you Addingham.  Very sad.
I have a second dog who is now 15 but he is still itching to get out and about, up in the hills, long distance walking, camping etc.  As I said in my earlier post, at what point do I say, "you have to stay at home" - only I can make that decision.......





phil1960

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Re: Farewell old pal. A moral dilemma
« Reply #17 on: 14:04:49, 23/01/18 »
I feel for you Addingham.  Very sad.
I have a second dog who is now 15 but he is still itching to get out and about, up in the hills, long distance walking, camping etc.  As I said in my earlier post, at what point do I say, "you have to stay at home" - only I can make that decision.......
Exactly, only you can say that. But equally, surely dogs are like us, I know fit and active people in their 80ís, but also others who can barely walk to the end of the road in their 60ís. What is considered old for one dog, even of the same breed, may be young for another. It isnít necessarily about age, but whether putting a dog in a certain environment is right for that particular dog. My genuine sympathies to Addingham.
Touching from a distance, further all the time.

Jac

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Re: Farewell old pal. A moral dilemma
« Reply #18 on: 10:49:27, 24/01/18 »
I feel for you Addingham.  Very sad.
I have a second dog who is now 15 but he is still itching to get out and about, up in the hills, long distance walking, camping etc.  As I said in my earlier post, at what point do I say, "you have to stay at home" - only I can make that decision.......

My sympathies for you both - the ghastly position we choose to put ourselves in when taking on a dog or any other dependant animal.
Most walks start by finding the way out of the car park

tonyk

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Re: Farewell old pal. A moral dilemma
« Reply #19 on: 13:49:51, 24/01/18 »
 Probably the right thing to as a dog will have far better chance of survival than a human in those conditions.Perhaps the dog had reached the end of its natural life and the harsh conditions finished it off?

pauldawes

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Re: Farewell old pal. A moral dilemma
« Reply #20 on: 17:32:40, 25/01/18 »
Its very sad, I wouldn't like to be in that situation with either of my dogs. Im not sure I could leave them though, but I have never been in that situation, so I wouldn't know.


I do know I would be absolutely devastated if I did have to leave one of them on a mountain side, which Im pretty sure is how the bloke is feeling now.


Agree 100 percent. I canít see how anybody reading bare facts of story can really doubt that..the fact that he ďsleptĒ in car (I bet he got naff all sleep) and went back up at first light says it all.


One aspect that I canít make my mind up about is rights or wrongs of calling MRT for a dog recue. Would that be unfair because it would be difficult for them to refuse rescue?(Iím assuming that one would be honest and say it was for a dog, and let them decide whether a rescue could be made WITHOUT risking their own life and limb.)

Jac

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Re: Farewell old pal. A moral dilemma
« Reply #21 on: 08:37:00, 26/01/18 »
One aspect that I can’t make my mind up about is rights or wrongs of calling MRT for a dog recue. Would that be unfair because it would be difficult for them to refuse rescue? I’m assuming that one would be honest and say it was for a dog, and let them decide whether a rescue could be made WITHOUT risking their own life and limb.

That's what I meant in my first reply. Not that I would expect them to turn out. Asking would at least allow some chance of help if they felt it possible.

Edited to try to remove unintentional italics - failed
« Last Edit: 16:37:42, 26/01/18 by Jac »
Most walks start by finding the way out of the car park

phil1960

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Re: Farewell old pal. A moral dilemma
« Reply #22 on: 09:06:48, 26/01/18 »
I canít speak for all MRTís obviously, but a member of Western Beacons MRT said recently they would almost certainly turn out for a dog, obviously reserving the right to abort should conditions be deemed too dangerous for personnel.
Touching from a distance, further all the time.

forest view

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Re: Farewell old pal. A moral dilemma
« Reply #23 on: 23:59:50, 02/02/18 »
Not passing any judgment but in our local MRT the dog always turns out for the human so perhaps ..............?
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