Author Topic: American walking the C2C  (Read 14546 times)

KathyDahm

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American walking the C2C
« on: 21:19:18, 25/01/18 »
Hi, I'm planning to walk the C2C in September of this year (2018), and have some concerns. One is about money. If ATM machines are few and far between, and if, as I've read, some won't accept foreign credit cards, what does a non-British citizen do about obtaining money? It sounds as though it might be necessary to travel with a good deal of cash, and I wonder how safe that is. I won't have a checkbook for a British bank, and I doubt that checks from an American bank would be accepted. Because my plan is to go at a fairly slow pace, logging around 10 to 12 miles a day, it will be a lengthy time frame. Any suggestions or experience in this matter? I'm a 75-year-old woman, and I'll be walking solo.


Then too, I'm wondering if many walkers choose a poncho for rain gear. I've walked the Camino Frances in northern Spain (500 miles) and the Camino Portuguese, from Porto to Santiago, and both times used a Ferrino poncho, much like the Altus, and liked it very much. It has arms, is rather long, and has a rear section to cover a backpack. But in the books I've read on the C2C, rain gear never mentions a poncho. I wonder if there's some reason for that that I'm not seeing.

sussamb

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Re: American walking the C2C
« Reply #1 on: 22:24:29, 25/01/18 »
Ponchos aren't popular in UK but some members here use them and wouldn't be without them so I wouldn't worry.  As for ATM's, you should be fine in the towns along the way but some of the small villages may not have any.  Sites like this should help you plan better based on your itinerary and likely spend

https://www.link.co.uk/consumers/locator/
Where there's a will ...

jimbob

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Re: American walking the C2C
« Reply #2 on: 23:26:50, 25/01/18 »
Ponchos are certainly OK by me. However they can be a pain if caught in windy conditions which we tend to have frequently in the UK. Does the Ferrino button down the front like an Altus, if so then you will have no problems. If not then be prepared to tie the poncho down lower than your rucksack or your walk may turn into a paragliding  experience.  :) .

Either way have fun. Oh and make sure your card has a 4 digit pin. Oh and know your pin by number as most UK ATMS are no longer alphabetical.

Too little, too late, too bad......

KathyDahm

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Re: American walking the C2C
« Reply #3 on: 01:38:50, 26/01/18 »
Ponchos aren't popular in UK but some members here use them and wouldn't be without them so I wouldn't worry.  As for ATM's, you should be fine in the towns along the way but some of the small villages may not have any.  Sites like this should help you plan better based on your itinerary and likely spend



Thanks so much for the suggestion.


KathyDahm

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Re: American walking the C2C
« Reply #4 on: 01:44:17, 26/01/18 »
Ponchos are certainly OK by me. However they can be a pain if caught in windy conditions which we tend to have frequently in the UK. Does the Ferrino button down the front like an Altus, if so then you will have no problems. If not then be prepared to tie the poncho down lower than your rucksack or your walk may turn into a paragliding  experience.  :) .

Either way have fun. Oh and make sure your card has a 4 digit pin. Oh and know your pin by number as most UK ATMS are no longer alphabetical.


The Ferrino has a zipper as well as a velcro fastener in front. No way to get caught in the wind. I get that problem. My card (from Charles Schwab, because they don't charge an extra fee for international transactions) does have a four-digit numerical pin, which I know by heart. :)  The only problem with the Ferrino, which I have in red, is that my little granddaughter says, "Grammy looks like a red tent." But it works to keep out the rain, and I guess, if I can't find a place to stay, I could use it as a tent? Maybe not.

ninthace

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Re: American walking the C2C
« Reply #5 on: 08:10:18, 26/01/18 »
Post offices can also be used to get cash using a card. Also shops, especially supermarkets, can offer cash back when making a card purchase. I have even known some pubs to offer this service. Kirkby Stephen, which is about halfway, has an ATM at the Co-op store and there was one still a bank there 18 months ago, but there was talk of it closing. There are also two outdoor pursuits shops there for resupply of hiking bits.
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gunwharfman

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Re: American walking the C2C
« Reply #6 on: 10:16:53, 26/01/18 »
As already said I don't think you will have problems, I have downloaded an app which shows me where all the ATM's are located, havn't needed to use it but its on my phone if needed. As regard shops, its my experience that most small towns and other places have a Co-Op shop, they always seem to have an ATM just inside the entrance. I also believe that most or all ATM's are now free to use, a few years ago some private companies tried to charge a small fee (mostly in pubs I think and shops that are individually owned) for getting money out but I think that practice has now died out?

I use a poncho made by Vaude and I find it very usefull. I did use the section that went over the rucksack but I don't bother now, I just keep my rucksack coverered with a normal rain cover. I've never experienced the 'wind problem'. If I needed to control the poncho in such a situation I'd just attempt to fix it by securing my belt on the outside. My Vaude however has a neat little solution already built in, a 3" x 1/2" press stud strap that holds the front and rear bottom edges together, thats all I've had to use so far.

Rather be walking

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Re: American walking the C2C
« Reply #7 on: 12:24:52, 26/01/18 »
Quote
I've never experienced the 'wind problem'
Made me chuckle  ;)


One thing we noticed that most village shops seemed on closed on a Mondays.
And there're no pies for sale in Cleator on Mondays I can confirm. :)

Here's a link to the rambling man, good TR.
https://ramblingman.org.uk/walks/coasttocoast/coast_to_coast_day_1

Jon.
« Last Edit: 12:30:22, 26/01/18 by Rather be walking »
““The hardest part was coming to terms with the constant dispiriting discovery that there is always more hill.”
― Bill Bryson, A Walk in the Woods

KathyDahm

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Re: American walking the C2C
« Reply #8 on: 16:26:17, 26/01/18 »
Post offices can also be used to get cash using a card. Also shops, especially supermarkets, can offer cash back when making a card purchase. I have even known some pubs to offer this service. Kirkby Stephen, which is about halfway, has an ATM at the Co-op store and there was one still a bank there 18 months ago, but there was talk of it closing. There are also two outdoor pursuits shops there for resupply of hiking bits.


This is so good to know. Many thanks!

KathyDahm

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Re: American walking the C2C
« Reply #9 on: 16:30:47, 26/01/18 »
Made me chuckle  ;)


One thing we noticed that most village shops seemed on closed on a Mondays.
And there're no pies for sale in Cleator on Mondays I can confirm. :)

Here's a link to the rambling man, good TR.
https://ramblingman.org.uk/walks/coasttocoast/coast_to_coast_day_1

Jon.


Thanks so much for the link to the Rambling Man book. I wish I could get it as an eBook (Kindle) but that only works for British Amazon users. But I can read it via the link. I love the first day account! I'll remember, no pies in Cleator. :)  My own days will be shorter than his, I'm sure. I'll probably stop in Cleator the first day.

KathyDahm

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Re: American walking the C2C
« Reply #10 on: 16:34:31, 26/01/18 »
As already said I don't think you will have problems, I have downloaded an app which shows me where all the ATM's are located, havn't needed to use it but its on my phone if needed. As regard shops, its my experience that most small towns and other places have a Co-Op shop, they always seem to have an ATM just inside the entrance. I also believe that most or all ATM's are now free to use, a few years ago some private companies tried to charge a small fee (mostly in pubs I think and shops that are individually owned) for getting money out but I think that practice has now died out?

I use a poncho made by Vaude and I find it very usefull. I did use the section that went over the rucksack but I don't bother now, I just keep my rucksack coverered with a normal rain cover. I've never experienced the 'wind problem'. If I needed to control the poncho in such a situation I'd just attempt to fix it by securing my belt on the outside. My Vaude however has a neat little solution already built in, a 3" x 1/2" press stud strap that holds the front and rear bottom edges together, thats all I've had to use so far.


The backpack section is built into the Ferrino, so it can't be removed. It does look a little silly, but it keeps out the rain very well, so I accept the absence of making a fashion statement. I like the idea of having an ap on my phone that will tell me where ATMs are. Thanks again.

Jonty1

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Re: American walking the C2C
« Reply #11 on: 19:59:00, 26/01/18 »
nd I wonder how safe that is. I won't have a checkbook for a British bank, and I doubt that checks from an american bank would be accepted[/size]

[/size]

[/size]
I have heard Dick Turpin takes his holidays in September, so you should be fine😀[/size]
Have a really great time and enjoy.Btw what accommodation are you using?[/size]

[/size]

KathyDahm

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Re: American walking the C2C
« Reply #12 on: 20:41:22, 26/01/18 »
nd I wonder how safe that is. I won't have a checkbook for a British bank, and I doubt that checks from an american bank would be accepted[/size]

[/size]

[/size]
I have heard Dick Turpin takes his holidays in September, so you should be fine😀[/size]
Have a really great time and enjoy.Btw what accommodation are you using?[/size]

[/size]


As an American, I'm afraid I had to "google" Dick Turpin to find out who he was. Although I haven't heard of him, I did memorize Alfred Noyes' poem "The Highwayman" when I was around 13. :)[size=78%]  My plan is to stay in hostels and B&Bs, depending on the town and the availability. Right now I'm feeling quite intimidated, reading Rambling Man's account of walking the C2C. It's harrowing, and now I wish I had a hiking partner. I'd decided to go on the walk solo, but there are sections he describes that really do frighten me--fording rushing streams and walking along cliff edges and scrambling down nearly sheer mountainsides. I'm not sure I can do that by myself. [/size]





gunwharfman

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Re: American walking the C2C
« Reply #13 on: 20:45:11, 26/01/18 »
What? Fording rushing streams, walking along cliff edges? I don't remember that. Was I on the right track, was he?

I'll have a read aof Rambling Man and make a comment later. Did I miss something?

ninthace

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Re: American walking the C2C
« Reply #14 on: 20:52:26, 26/01/18 »
I have met quite a few Americans walking the C2C. Some did it the "hard" way but quite a few used baggage transfer companies to move their luggage each day and travelled relatively light. There are lot of people on the route so you will probably not be short of someone to talk to.
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