Author Topic: American walking the C2C  (Read 14902 times)

KathyDahm

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Re: American walking the C2C
« Reply #15 on: 20:57:03, 26/01/18 »
What? Fording rushing streams, walking along cliff edges? I don't remember that. Was I on the right track, was he?

I'll have a read aof Rambling Man and make a comment later. Did I miss something?


It's the part through the Lake District. I haven't gotten a lot further than that yet, but my heart is still pounding thinking about some of it. And I crossed the Pyrenees and two other mountain ranges walking the Camino Frances. Of course, I was only 73 then. Now that I'm 75, I'm not as fearless.

KathyDahm

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Re: American walking the C2C
« Reply #16 on: 21:04:19, 26/01/18 »
I have met quite a few Americans walking the C2C. Some did it the "hard" way but quite a few used baggage transfer companies to move their luggage each day and travelled relatively light. There are lot of people on the route so you will probably not be short of someone to talk to.


I'm very interested in using a baggage transfer company, but I'm wondering if one can arrange that day by day, rather than making a plan for the entire walk. I imagined that there would be lots of people walking in September. That's what I'm hoping for.

gunwharfman

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Re: American walking the C2C
« Reply #17 on: 21:37:32, 26/01/18 »
I've just had a read. I remember the first real descent after Cleator, a bit steep but it was just grass and bare earth where many footsteps had trodden as I remember. I didn't find it difficult, I just plodded my way down to the bottom, used my sticks to keep me steady and then at the bottom (about 50yds down) ordinary walking after that to Ennerdale. OK it was bright and sunny when I did it, three times in all, same sort of weather and I accept that if wet on the day it would be more slippy. At worst, as long as you were careful and used your sticks you might just slide down on your bum? I thought Rambling Man's paragraph about it was a teeny bit exaggerated, maybe I'm wrong?

At Ennerdale Lake there is a choice, its very easy if you keep to the left hand side of the lake and even if you chose the harder side both paths end up at the same place.

The bit up from Black Sail can be a bit of a puff but normally if you have daylight there's no need to rush at it. I enjoyed it, loads of good views, easy to sit down anywhere.

As regards the chain and rocks bit, I've missed that every time, I wonder how? From the slate mine to the Youth Hostel is downhill but I found it an easy enough stroll.

From the YHA to Grasmere is a nice walk, a bit up yes, a bit of a sweaty time, you have to make an extra effort at times, one place only I think was a bit steep but I do not remember any of it as too difficult. Going down towards Grasmere was a bit harder on my leg muscles but downhills can be like this anyway. I would certainly recommend going into Grasmere, its a nice twee little place and I'm sure a pleasant place to stay overnight.

Getting to Patterdale is a bit like going from the YHA to Grasmere, a bit uphill, a bit of a plod, over the top, then down to the Lake and then onward to Patterdale. Visually very nice. I agree with Rambling Man the YHA there, is (or was?) a bit of a dump. I was with company at the time so I did enjoy it. Glenridding is only a short distance away, I prefer this place more.

There is a bit of a plod uphill, well worn but not difficult terrain the next morning but once on the top, as I remember it, plain walking until you get to High Street. Then you drop down to Haweswater, this is a bit of a steep downhill section, but no real problem, my sticks help a lot and I found plenty of rocks to hold onto for balance or to sit on, its another downhill section thats all. Once at the bottom its more or less easyish walking until the end of the walk. After Haweswater then its mainly about general walking stamina that takes over.

One proviso though, if you are unlucky with the weather, as described by Rambling Man it can be horrible, no doubt about it, but for me I've been lucky. I've experienced similar weather in other parts of the Lakes and I know what its like to be miserable, fed up and and wet throgh, not nice at all.

I hope KD you are not going to be put off, I'm sure you will enjoy it. I was about 69, 70 when I walked it and I met older people than me doing it and faster as well.

These are just my personal memories, maybe others on the Forum will comment to support my view, or tell me my memory is rubbish?


KathyDahm

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Re: American walking the C2C
« Reply #18 on: 21:44:32, 26/01/18 »
Thanks so much for taking the time to read Rambling Man's account and tell me your own experience, gunwharfman. I must say, I feel a lot better about it, seeing it from your point of view. It does sound as though the weather can change everything, and if the weather is really terrible, there's no law saying that I can't either wait it out or skip a section. You've given my self-confidence a good boost. Many thanks.

sussamb

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Re: American walking the C2C
« Reply #19 on: 21:54:43, 26/01/18 »
I've never walked the C2C but done a number of long distance walks.  You've had some good advice here, I'll just add that as a 'cousin from across the pond' you'll be warmly welcomed so I hope you enjoy your trip :)
Where there's a will ...

Ridge

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Re: American walking the C2C
« Reply #20 on: 21:59:25, 26/01/18 »
Hi


Nothing to add to the advice but huge admiration. I wonder how many of your granddaughters friends Grandmas are walking across a whole country, what a brilliant role model.
You should have a wonderful time and there will be lots of friendly people to meet and chat to.


Ridge
Over hill, over dale. Thorough brush, thorough brier....
I do wander every where

KathyDahm

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Re: American walking the C2C
« Reply #21 on: 22:05:00, 26/01/18 »
Thank you so much! I've felt all my life that my heart is British, because I was formed on British literature from a very young age (A. A. Milne, Enid Blyton,Frances Hodgson Burnett) and on through all the British literature I studied in school, college, and graduate school. Walking the C2C will feel like coming home, I know.


I don't know about being a role model, but I'd love to think that my granddaughters might enjoy long-distance walks too someday. My children themselves love back-packing and hiking, but the demands of life prevent them from accompanying me right now. Thanks to all for the encouragement.

Ridge

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Re: American walking the C2C
« Reply #22 on: 22:26:24, 26/01/18 »
If you didn't read it as a child you should try to find Arthur Ransome's  Swallows and Amazons before you come to the Lake District.
Over hill, over dale. Thorough brush, thorough brier....
I do wander every where

KathyDahm

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Re: American walking the C2C
« Reply #23 on: 22:30:54, 26/01/18 »
Thanks. I haven't read it. I see that our library has a copy of it though, and I'll read it right away! ,

TinTin

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Re: American walking the C2C
« Reply #24 on: 09:27:08, 27/01/18 »
If it helps I did the C2C in May last year and amongst the many people I met I would say close to 50% were from your side of the pond  O0

jimbob

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Re: American walking the C2C
« Reply #25 on: 10:28:49, 27/01/18 »
Baggage Transfer. I do not think it is as well organised as on the Camino Frances. However you have a bit of time, you can email a number of the companies and ask them for their procedure and their willingness to do day ahead bookings etc.

Gunwharfman gives great advice based on solid experience. The author (Ramblingman)  of the article has a wry sense of humour, but then again he did walk the Lake District part in the period of heaviest rain in decades. (The clue to the amount of rain lies in the name" Lake district", without plenty of rain there would be no lakes). Your poncho and waterproof legwear will take care of that. By the way Gunwharfman wears a rain skirt as a very light weight and easy on/off alternative to rain trousers.

 If you managed the descent from Alto de Perdon without mishap then you will manage the C2C descents.
Too little, too late, too bad......

tonyk

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Re: American walking the C2C
« Reply #26 on: 13:13:30, 27/01/18 »
 
Quote
Right now I'm feeling quite intimidated, reading Rambling Man's account of walking the C2C. It's harrowing, and now I wish I had a hiking partner. I'd decided to go on the walk solo, but there are sections he describes that really do frighten me--fording rushing streams and walking along cliff edges and scrambling down nearly sheer mountainsides. I'm not sure I can do that by myself.

 The Rambling Man's account seems a bit embellished to make good reading.I have done the coast to coast walk four times and can't recall fearing for my life at any point.Provided you have got decent footwear that maintains grip on wet rock and use walking poles you should be fine on the descents.Some of ascents can be a bit taxing but provided you go slowly and take your time you will get to the top.Yes,the route does go close to the cliffs at start and finish but not so close that you would go over the edge if you fell over.
 

harland

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Re: American walking the C2C
« Reply #27 on: 13:29:04, 27/01/18 »

 The Rambling Man's account seems a bit embellished to make good reading.I have done the coast to coast walk four times and can't recall fearing for my life at any point.Provided you have got decent footwear that maintains grip on wet rock and use walking poles you should be fine on the descents.Some of ascents can be a bit taxing but provided you go slowly and take your time you will get to the top.Yes,the route does go close to the cliffs at start and finish but not so close that you would go over the edge if you fell over.
Totally agree.

KathyDahm

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Re: American walking the C2C
« Reply #28 on: 15:51:47, 27/01/18 »
I feel so encouraged by all of you! Many, many thanks! If the walkers I meet along the way are as helpful as all of you are, I'll have no trouble at all. I know that I'm going to run into rain. That was true on my two Caminos, especially in Galicia. That doesn't worry me as much as rain on rocky mountain paths, making them slippery. The descent from Alto de Perdon on the Camino Frances is not for the faint of heart, for sure, and I took it one step at a time, giving constant thanks for my hiking poles and for the fact that it wasn't raining when I was on that stretch. I did break it up too, stopping in El Acebo for the night before continuing the downward spiral. It was a treacherous descent, and I'll be glad if the descents on the C2C aren't any worse, but I'm not counting on that either. Frankly, I'm more concerned about fording streams (especially carrying a heavy pack), and walking on narrows paths with a drop-off on one side. I suffer from serious vertigo in situations like that. Very steep, long ascents are hard, but easier for me than the extremely steep descents. The hiking poles let me pull myself up the mountains. :)  And it's so rewarding at last to reach the top! 

harland

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Re: American walking the C2C
« Reply #29 on: 16:04:13, 27/01/18 »
I am not sure whether you will need to "ford streams" that seems to indicate being up to your knees in the stream.  You are more likely to find that you will very occasionally be using stepping stones. I certainly didn't get my feet wet! ;D