Author Topic: American walking the C2C  (Read 11230 times)

tonyk

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Re: American walking the C2C
« Reply #30 on: 17:15:23, 27/01/18 »
 The only part I can remember as being slightly exposed was at the start of the section from Keld to Reeth.If you are concerned about it there is an alternative route through the valley to Reeth.You can see the exposed section at 5.11 on this video.

 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cNmSQytPRxM

 Another section is the path at Ennerdale Water,but its only for a very short section where the path climbs over a crag.

 My first coast coast walk was in 1982 and it rained almost everyday.I can't remember having to ford any streams despite the constant rain.

bricam2096

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Re: American walking the C2C
« Reply #31 on: 18:09:01, 27/01/18 »
Another section is the path at Ennerdale Water,but its only for a very short section where the path climbs over a crag.

And I would recommend taking the path on the other side of the water as it's smooth. Having done both paths, I know which I prefer  O0
LDWs done - 28 in total including 13 National Trails and 3 C2C

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KathyDahm

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Re: American walking the C2C
« Reply #32 on: 03:38:44, 28/01/18 »
I've spent part of the day working on an itinerary and looking at the calendar, trying to decide when to leave here (probably Sept. 3) and when to return. I've decided on a 20 day itinerary, longer, I know, than most suggested ones. But I know from experience that I do best when I walk an average of 10-12 miles a day, and several days are necessarily longer--i.e. from Patterdale to Bampton Grange or Shap, from Orton to Kirkby Stephen, and from Kirkby Stephen to Keld. I've included a few short days, which I'm sure I'll be grateful for.
I have a couple of questions for those of you who are so familiar with the walk. Do you think that a rest day along the way is important?
And about that walk from Patterdale to Shap. Have any of you stopped at Bampton Grange, and does that make for an easier day or not much?
Any other advice as far as planning an itinerary is concerned would be much appreciated.

KathyDahm

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Re: American walking the C2C
« Reply #33 on: 03:52:40, 28/01/18 »
The only part I can remember as being slightly exposed was at the start of the section from Keld to Reeth.If you are concerned about it there is an alternative route through the valley to Reeth.You can see the exposed section at 5.11 on this video.

 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cNmSQytPRxM

 Another section is the path at Ennerdale Water,but its only for a very short section where the path climbs over a crag.

 My first coast coast walk was in 1982 and it rained almost everyday.I can't remember having to ford any streams despite the constant rain.


Oh my goodness. My heart is doing flipflops. I think I'll need to do the alternative route through the valley to Reeth.  Is the second section on the north or south side of Ennerdale Water? I'd thought I'd walk on the north side, from what I've read, but if the section you're referring to is on the north, maybe I should reconsider. Your video is amazing though, and the scenery is so incredibly beautiful!

KathyDahm

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Re: American walking the C2C
« Reply #34 on: 03:53:45, 28/01/18 »
And I would recommend taking the path on the other side of the water as it's smooth. Having done both paths, I know which I prefer  O0


So is the "other side of the water" the north or the south side?

tonyk

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Re: American walking the C2C
« Reply #35 on: 11:25:03, 28/01/18 »

Oh my goodness. My heart is doing flipflops. I think I'll need to do the alternative route through the valley to Reeth.  Is the second section on the north or south side of Ennerdale Water? I'd thought I'd walk on the north side, from what I've read, but if the section you're referring to is on the north, maybe I should reconsider. Your video is amazing though, and the scenery is so incredibly beautiful!

 The south side of Ennerdale Water is the side with the narrow path.The section shown in the photo is the worst part.

 http://s0.geograph.org.uk/photos/54/59/545991_ff22382c.jpg

 The north side is far easier and probably the best choice if you are not comfortable on exposed ground.

 

 

Percy

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Re: American walking the C2C
« Reply #36 on: 12:03:56, 28/01/18 »
I walked the c2c a couple of years ago. In terms of using an American credit card you will be fine with either Visa or MasterCard, some small places won't take American Express as they charge too much commission. You'll be able to use these in ATMs but I expect there are hefty charges for taking out cash with a credit card. There certainly are for UK credit cards. Your regular current (checking???) account card will be better to use.


In terms of ATMs along the way:


I can't remember if there is one in St Bees but as it's the start make sure you turn up with cash.


In my experience the shop in Cleator never has pies.  ;D  But it did have an ATM when I passed through 4 years ago.


The next ATM you will hit will be in Grasmere. Youth Hostels will take cards for accommodation and food and drink. As will pubs. After that you have quite a good run with machines in Glenridding (inside the village store) and Shap. Kirkby Stephen is a decent sized town and has a bank and an ATM in one of the supermarkets. There is a gap then to Richmond which again is a town with a handful of banks. It's after Richmond that it gets a bit sparse. I left Richmond with a good chunk of cash on me. There might be a cash machine in the shop in Reeth but I can't remember for sure.


Unless you have a particular interest in the history of mining I would take the lower route from Keld to Reeth along Swaledale as it is beautiful.





If you take the valley route here then you won't encounter any real exposure on the route unless you take some of the high level alternatives in the Lake District. If the idea of exposure bothers you I would still recommend doing the high level alternative between Borrowdale and Grasmere (along to Helm Crag) - it doesn't add any ascent you just stay higher for longer which is well worth it in the Lake District. Weather permitting of course.


You will meet lots of people in September, often bumping into them each night in the pub.


You will have a great time.


tonyk is right about Ennerdale. Much easier walking along the north of the Lake - well made forest tracks - still a great walk.
« Last Edit: 12:10:23, 28/01/18 by Percy »

rural roamer

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Re: American walking the C2C
« Reply #37 on: 13:47:24, 28/01/18 »
We walked the C2C about 6 years ago in September, over 16 days. We didnít take a rest day but if you are thinking of doing that pick a larger place where there is something to do. A lot of people were stopping at Richmond, although it is over halfway probably has the most history.  Kirkby Stephen is the other stopping point. Iím not sure from your posts if you are camping or B&B and whether you are booking in advance. If so, could you pay by card before you leave home?  We walked the south shore of Ennerdale on a paricularly wet day and wished we had walked along the north. I would suggest that where there are alternative routes you keep an open mind and possibly change according to the weather. We ended up doing different routes to what we originally intended. We stayed in Bampton Grange because of the mileage to Shap and that was a good call for us as we ended up missing out Kidsty Pike along with a few others because of the tail end of an American hurricane! So we walked over the moors to Shap, which Wainwright actually mentions in his book. Baggage transfer companies - we used Sherpa, theres also Packhorse and Brigantes. You will have a great time and meet lots of people.  I always go prepared to have some bad weather and then Iím not disappointed! I think it sort of makes it feel like youíve completed more of a challenge.

ninthace

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Re: American walking the C2C
« Reply #38 on: 13:56:49, 28/01/18 »

Oh my goodness. My heart is doing flipflops. I think I'll need to do the alternative route through the valley to Reeth.  Is the second section on the north or south side of Ennerdale Water? I'd thought I'd walk on the north side, from what I've read, but if the section you're referring to is on the north, maybe I should reconsider. Your video is amazing though, and the scenery is so incredibly beautiful!


Please don't do the alternative route to Reeth. The "exposed" section between Crackpot Hall and the bridge over Swinner Gill is very very  short and not at all scary, I ever done it loads of times in both directions - no problem at all and I don't like exposure.  You then get to climb up by East Grain beck (the higher and most obvious path is the easiest, don't be tempted to walk close to beck as it is a bit of a struggle out at the far end to gain the higher path).  The reward is having crossed the moor you will drop down into Gunnerside which is really beautiful and full of industrial archaeology - not to missed in my opinion and the ruin of the old peat store by the beck crossing makes a great spot for a lunch stop.
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Murphy

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Re: American walking the C2C
« Reply #39 on: 15:25:51, 28/01/18 »
I agree absolutely with Ninthace........well worth the higher route over Swinnergill and down into Gunnerside.  Done it loads of times during regular stays at Muker/Thwaite. 

gunwharfman

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Re: American walking the C2C
« Reply #40 on: 19:18:44, 28/01/18 »
Dear KD, I expect your overwhelmed with all the help and advice you getting you are getting? Just one other thing from me. I don't know what book, internet site(s) you are looking at but for the chance to study the route in great detail you might find it useful to go on Bing maps, and look up Ordance Survey, these I believe are the best of all. On Bing Maps they are provided free of charge. That is of course if you can log onto the UK version of Bing maps? If you want to view a map with the possibility of buying a real one, I chose Harveys, (www.harveymaps.co.uk) they show the route as a strip map in great detail and you only need two of them, the East and the West, costing £25.90. If you were tempted to buy Ordance Survey maps of the whole route I think it would cost you about £64.00. The other type of map is an A5 64 page booklet by the company A to Z (www.az.co.uk) witch is printed with Ordance Survey maps. The price is £10 I think. If I had realised at the time I bought my Harveys maps that the A to Z were in print I would have gone for their booklet maps without hesitation.

KathyDahm

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Re: American walking the C2C
« Reply #41 on: 19:36:26, 28/01/18 »
Dear KD, I expect your overwhelmed with all the help and advice you getting you are getting? Just one other thing from me. I don't know what book, internet site(s) you are looking at but for the chance to study the route in great detail you might find it useful to go on Bing maps, and look up Ordance Survey, these I believe are the best of all. On Bing Maps they are provided free of charge. That is of course if you can log onto the UK version of Bing maps? If you want to view a map with the possibility of buying a real one, I chose Harveys, (www.harveymaps.co.uk) they show the route as a strip map in great detail and you only need two of them, the East and the West, costing £25.90. If you were tempted to buy Ordance Survey maps of the whole route I think it would cost you about £64.00. The other type of map is an A5 64 page booklet by the company A to Z (www.az.co.uk) witch is printed with Ordance Survey maps. The price is £10 I think. If I had realised at the time I bought my Harveys maps that the A to Z were in print I would have gone for their booklet maps without hesitation.


Thanks so much, Gunwharfman, this is a great suggestion! I'm not at all overwhelmed with help and advice. Believe me, I need all I can get, especially during this planning stage. I'll see is I can get to the Bing maps, and I like the idea of buying the Harvey maps.

KathyDahm

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Re: American walking the C2C
« Reply #42 on: 19:41:53, 28/01/18 »

Please don't do the alternative route to Reeth. The "exposed" section between Crackpot Hall and the bridge over Swinner Gill is very very  short and not at all scary, I ever done it loads of times in both directions - no problem at all and I don't like exposure.  You then get to climb up by East Grain beck (the higher and most obvious path is the easiest, don't be tempted to walk close to beck as it is a bit of a struggle out at the far end to gain the higher path).  The reward is having crossed the moor you will drop down into Gunnerside which is really beautiful and full of industrial archaeology - not to missed in my opinion and the ruin of the old peat store by the beck crossing makes a great spot for a lunch stop.


I appreciate your advice, Ninthace, but I can't get the video posted by Tonyk out of my head. It looked heart-stopping, and seemed to go on for some time. I don't have courage when it comes to drop-offs, or exposure as you Brits call it. I'd really love the reward of crossing the moor and "dropping down into Gunnerside", but if I were to get to that point and not be able to continue, that wouldn't be good either. I wish I were younger. I might be more courageous then.

KathyDahm

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Re: American walking the C2C
« Reply #43 on: 19:44:51, 28/01/18 »
We walked the C2C about 6 years ago in September, over 16 days. We didnít take a rest day but if you are thinking of doing that pick a larger place where there is something to do. A lot of people were stopping at Richmond, although it is over halfway probably has the most history.  Kirkby Stephen is the other stopping point. Iím not sure from your posts if you are camping or B&B and whether you are booking in advance. If so, could you pay by card before you leave home?  We walked the south shore of Ennerdale on a paricularly wet day and wished we had walked along the north. I would suggest that where there are alternative routes you keep an open mind and possibly change according to the weather. We ended up doing different routes to what we originally intended. We stayed in Bampton Grange because of the mileage to Shap and that was a good call for us as we ended up missing out Kidsty Pike along with a few others because of the tail end of an American hurricane! So we walked over the moors to Shap, which Wainwright actually mentions in his book. Baggage transfer companies - we used Sherpa, theres also Packhorse and Brigantes. You will have a great time and meet lots of people.  I always go prepared to have some bad weather and then Iím not disappointed! I think it sort of makes it feel like youíve completed more of a challenge.


I agree about being prepared for some bad weather. Thanks for the advice about stopping at Bampton Grange. That sounds like a good choice for me. I won't be camping. I'll stay in hostels when I can, and otherwise, B&Bs.

KathyDahm

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Re: American walking the C2C
« Reply #44 on: 19:50:03, 28/01/18 »
I walked the c2c a couple of years ago. In terms of using an American credit card you will be fine with either Visa or MasterCard, some small places won't take American Express as they charge too much commission. You'll be able to use these in ATMs but I expect there are hefty charges for taking out cash with a credit card. There certainly are for UK credit cards. Your regular current (checking???) account card will be better to use.


In terms of ATMs along the way:


I can't remember if there is one in St Bees but as it's the start make sure you turn up with cash


In my experience the shop in Cleator never has pies.  ;D  But it did have an ATM when I passed through 4 years ago.


The next ATM you will hit will be in Grasmere. Youth Hostels will take cards for accommodation and food and drink. As will pubs. After that you have quite a good run with machines in Glenridding (inside the village store) and Shap. Kirkby Stephen is a decent sized town and has a bank and an ATM in one of the supermarkets. There is a gap then to Richmond which again is a town with a handful of banks. It's after Richmond that it gets a bit sparse. I left Richmond with a good chunk of cash on me. There might be a cash machine in the shop in Reeth but I can't remember for sure.


Unless you have a particular interest in the history of mining I would take the lower route from Keld to Reeth along Swaledale as it is beautiful.





If you take the valley route here then you won't encounter any real exposure on the route unless you take some of the high level alternatives in the Lake District. If the idea of exposure bothers you I would still recommend doing the high level alternative between Borrowdale and Grasmere (along to Helm Crag) - it doesn't add any ascent you just stay higher for longer which is well worth it in the Lake District. Weather permitting of course.


You will meet lots of people in September, often bumping into them each night in the pub.


You will have a great time.


tonyk is right about Ennerdale. Much easier walking along the north of the Lake - well made forest tracks - still a great walk.


Thanks, Percy. This is all such good advice. I'm taking notes--about the ATMs and about the high level alternative between Borrowdale and Grasmere. I'm counting on that last bit about meeting lots of people and seeing them in the evenings. That was one of the joys of walking the Camino de Santiago de Compostela.