Author Topic: Accident With A Gate  (Read 992 times)

Lee in Doncaster

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Accident With A Gate
« on: 18:58:23, 16/02/18 »
Something at the bottom of the gate caught the back of my boot and ripped off the sole:


http://peakwalking.blogspot.co.uk/2018/02/tideswell-millers-dale-wormhill-and.html




Has anyone else had problems with gates?




Walking every week in the Peak District...or somewhere else   http://peakwalking.blogspot.com

Islandplodder

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Re: Accident With A Gate
« Reply #1 on: 21:29:05, 16/02/18 »

That was unfortunate, never heard of that happening before.
Glad you managed to hobble to somewhere you could pick up a bus

gunwharfman

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Re: Accident With A Gate
« Reply #2 on: 09:41:38, 17/02/18 »
I really hate it when gates fight back! Splinters, trying to open when one end is stuck in mud, barbed wire tacked along the top and you have to climb over, the metal bits that pinch your fingers and worst of all (it happened to me once) when some joker smeared cows poo all along the gate top (for a laugh no doubt) and I put both hands into the mess! Should have kept my eyes open. Also when cows get their own back when both sides of the gate are really deep with sticky gooey mud and equally sticky runny faeces and there is no other way except to wade through it! Take note, Cotswold Way!

barewirewalker

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Re: Accident With A Gate
« Reply #3 on: 10:07:33, 17/02/18 »
Shame you did not have witnesses, you probably had a liable claim for damages.


On a serious side, I have seen very many gates that could cause damage or injury, compounded by the clumsy methods of securing them so that they cannot be opened to gain legitimate access.


If there were a 'Charter of Hospitality', a counter equivalent to the Countryside Code, safety of the visitor should be high on the list. Even a glimmer of understanding of this is notable in its absence from the Country Landowner's Association's policy on access.


Badly hung gates will drag along the ground, the wear is likely to create sharp edges on metal components of the gate, so catching your heel under the gate is foreseeable, so it should fall within the duties of care of the land owner.


Gunwarfman's slurry anointed gate may have just been innaccurate muck spreading. Though a duty of care towards those other's who might be in the countryside might actually start to create an understanding between 'occupier' and visitor, which would be a start of tempering the arrogance of the 'land owner'.
BWW
Their Land is in Our Country.

pleb

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Re: Accident With A Gate
« Reply #4 on: 11:02:46, 17/02/18 »
So now you walk with a funny gate?
(sorry  :-[ )

fernman

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Re: Accident With A Gate
« Reply #5 on: 11:06:21, 17/02/18 »
you probably had a liable claim for damages.

It would be an open and shut case.

Lee in Doncaster

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Re: Accident With A Gate
« Reply #6 on: 10:58:00, 18/02/18 »
Some interesting replies posted. I've of course had other problems with gates; cutting or bruises fingers or hands, having to climb over illegally blocked gates,cows or horses blocking the way...barbed wire, electric fences.
Walking every week in the Peak District...or somewhere else   http://peakwalking.blogspot.com

pauldawes

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Re: Accident With A Gate
« Reply #7 on: 11:56:21, 18/02/18 »
Some interesting replies posted. I've of course had other problems with gates; cutting or bruises fingers or hands, having to climb over illegally blocked gates,cows or horses blocking the way...barbed wire, electric fences.


Presence of manure heaps making access to gate more difficult, barbed wire as close as possible to stile as possible, electric fence nearby, presence of thorny bushes right up to stile, etc, etc.


All clear signs of that minority of farmer that wants to send out a pretty clear message: “walkers not welcome”. ( A jaundiced view maybe. Having ripped a couple of walking jackets getting over tricky stiles maybe I’m biased.)


It is a minority of farmers. But in my experience not a small minority...it’s something I eexperience  in maybe 20 percent of my farmland walks. I’m surprised there are not more comments on on these types of problems on this forum...but guess most members tend to do most of their walks in areas where most of the walk is in open country, rather than arable farmland, or stocked farmland?

gunwharfman

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Re: Accident With A Gate
« Reply #8 on: 12:02:47, 18/02/18 »
Have you noticed that about cows, lolling around at stiles and gates just to annoy hikers!

pauldawes

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Re: Accident With A Gate
« Reply #9 on: 16:46:46, 18/02/18 »
Have you noticed that about cows, lolling around at stiles and gates just to annoy hikers!


I have harboured dark suspicions along those very lines...but my nephew and his lad...both well versed in interpreting bovine behaviour...assure me it’s natural behaviour rather than careful training by the farmers.

tonyk

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Re: Accident With A Gate
« Reply #10 on: 21:25:55, 18/02/18 »
Something at the bottom of the gate caught the back of my boot and ripped off the sole:




 Be more careful.Next time it could be your trousers. ;)

barewirewalker

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Re: Accident With A Gate
« Reply #11 on: 11:54:23, 19/02/18 »
[/font]It is a minority of farmers. But in my experience not a small minority...it’s something I experience  in maybe 20 percent of my farmland walks. I’m surprised there are not more comments on on these types of problems on this forum...but guess most members tend to do most of their walks in areas where most of the walk is in open country, rather than arable farmland, or stocked farmland?


Is it a minority or a growing number?


My brother in law was a member of the Country Landowners Associations for a number of years, this was around the time I was a member of my county council's Local Access Forum, during that time I had the chance to read the CLA's monthly Land and Business publication. He is a small farmer, not the the sort of person immediately associated with the identity of "landowner", those few years access to this publication gave me intro to the propaganda that is the basis of an endemic anti access attitude.


My bro in law now has realised that he was being conned by the CLA and has given up his membership so I no longer have an insight to recent articles, but it was not before I discovered I could access their website through his membership number and I was able to download their policy on access. Curiously the active CLA member on out LAF did not inform us that the CLA had a policy on access and that had had been updated in 2012, though at the time we were notified by the joint policy published by interested user parties (RA, BMA, BHS etc.).


I agree with Pauldawes, there is a worrying lack of interest amongst walkers in general about this growing trend, logically the landowner should be pro access as it has been shown in a number of surveys that the contribution to the rural economy from access is considerable and growing, yet the CLA policy is to trim the access network to those paths most used and accelerate the closure of little used paths, rather than explore how the Access network can be made more effective. They have closed their minds to 'lostways', which a little research show many to be missing parts of long distance routes, preferring to believe and publish biased innuendo supplied by their own membership.
Have you noticed that about cows, lolling around at stiles and gates just to annoy hikers!


Gunwarfman's observation may be a bit off track, but there are plenty of real signs about how this orchestrated animosity manifests itself.


Here I questioned the true course of the Offa's Dyke trail, the part of the actual dyke that probably is the most revealing part about it construction and purpose is not on the route but 20 miles away in the land owned by the landowner, who wrote and published the CLA's policy on access. Surprise, surprise......there is no access to this section of Offa's Dyke.


It would be an open and shut case.


 ;D  A neat reply, trouble is the gates in the minds of the landowners are firmly shut and corroded up with inherited slurry.
BWW
Their Land is in Our Country.

Oxenhoper

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Re: Accident With A Gate
« Reply #12 on: 02:22:20, 20/02/18 »
Have you noticed that about cows, lolling around at stiles and gates just to annoy hikers!


Yep - with their calves, to make it even more difficult (and potentially dangerous) to shift them. 
Oxenhoper was born in Burnley but had the sense to move somewhere nicer at the age of five days.