Author Topic: Cooking Fuels & Stove Types  (Read 3226 times)

alan de enfield

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Re: Cooking Fuels & Stove Types
« Reply #15 on: 21:44:18, 01/03/18 »

How much money are you saving by refilling your own?


Dunno, its just part of the 'fun', but a quick look at costs


Lets say a 100g cartridge is around £3 - £4 (lets call it £3) so 1 kg of gas costs £30.
A 15kg Butane cylinder costs around £25.
15 kg would give 150 cartridge refills = equivalent cost £450.


Alternatively, to fill from 500g cartridges.
Amazon has 6x 500g Coleman cartridges at £24 (inc Delivery)
So I can potentially fill 25x 100g cartridges which would have cost £75


The non-financial benefit is that you can carry a cartridge of the correct size (knowing it's full) for the 'trip' without having to carry an 'extra one' because they may not be enough in the part used one, or ending up with loads of part used cartridges sat in the cupboard.


I like 'pottering' about, making stove-stands, paracord water bottle carriers, looking for ways to reduce weight etc etc.

Dan1902

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Re: Cooking Fuels & Stove Types
« Reply #16 on: 07:28:04, 02/03/18 »
I don't buy everything in bulk so my savings aren't as great.
£1 to refill my 220g canister which cost £5 from a camping shop at the time.
However like alan above had said, it negates having to worry about bringing 2 with you if you think one might run out or being left at home with multiple canisters with low levels of fuel in them.

I bought an adapter via ebay which cost around £2. Have refilled up the same canister several times so far and it works fine.
After a while I expect the canister to degrade as it gets used and dinked about etc during general wear and tear. Can just start again with a new one.
A decent amount YouTube videos on how to do it as well.

fernman

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Re: Cooking Fuels & Stove Types
« Reply #17 on: 08:56:00, 02/03/18 »
Part-used gas cartridges are not a problem for me, I simply use them up in base camps.
A new, unused one is carried on my walk, the used ones stay behind in the car.
When they're empty, though, I'm never sure whether I ought to drop them in the recycling bin or not, with all the tin cans etc.

alan de enfield

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Re: Cooking Fuels & Stove Types
« Reply #18 on: 09:07:20, 02/03/18 »

Dyffryn Ardudwy

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Re: Cooking Fuels & Stove Types
« Reply #19 on: 13:44:25, 02/03/18 »
I still recon my Jetboil Zip stove, is amongst the best designed small portable stoves on the market.
Colemans gas cartridges are universally available in most countries, and the stove boils water in a matter of minutes.
Maybe not the best stove for cooking your meal, but for a very rewarding warm drink in the hills, especially in the current weather, its a good choice.

Mel

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Re: Cooking Fuels & Stove Types
« Reply #20 on: 18:59:56, 02/03/18 »
When they're empty, though, I'm never sure whether I ought to drop them in the recycling bin or not, with all the tin cans etc.


If they are fully discharged (empty!) then yes you should be able to.  It's only pressurised containers you're not supposed to put in there because of the ka-boom factor when the stuff goes through the crushing machine  O0
No expense spared in pursuit of a bargain ;)
https://snailspacewalks.blogspot.co.uk/

shoarthing

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Re: Cooking Fuels & Stove Types
« Reply #21 on: 15:42:25, 13/03/18 »
. . . I mostly go camping to be at peace in a relatively wild place, so the noise of gas (leaving aside the recycling issues) makes it a no-no.


Have settled on an “Evernew”-clone Ti alcohol burner & cross bars. Around 60g. With a roll-up Ti windshield (needs a couple of shepherd’s crook Ti stakes to keep it in place) about another 20-25g. Mebbe 100g of bio-ethanol for an overnighter, plus its bottle.


But, yes, this is a no-simmer boil-only setup.

Tin

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Re: Cooking Fuels & Stove Types
« Reply #22 on: 08:59:16, 15/03/18 »
But, yes, this is a no-simmer boil-only setup.


I don't have an Evernew nor a clone but have seen videos of people using simmer rings on them (whilst looking for simmer rings for my fancy feast stove). The Trangia's simmer ring fits over the Evernew but there's obviously a small weight penalty and have also seen people place a tin tube over the stove for simmering.

shoarthing

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Re: Cooking Fuels & Stove Types
« Reply #23 on: 09:07:00, 15/03/18 »

I don't have an Evernew nor a clone but have seen videos of people using simmer rings on them (whilst looking for simmer rings for my fancy feast stove). The Trangia's simmer ring fits over the Evernew but there's obviously a small weight penalty and have also seen people place a tin tube over the stove for simmering.
. . . . thank you & well-spotted. The Trangia simmer-ring doesn’t alas work properly; but, yes, ‘simmer rings’ (made from aluminium tonic-water cans) appear from Youtube & so on to repay experimentation.


Have purchased eight rather fetching tonic-water cans.


Also purchased a bottle of posho gin, hand-made, doubtless by a tattoo’d feller with a hipster beard.


Have carefully emptied the tonic out of a can - entirely to accelerate the simmer-ring process - onto the gin (and some ice) and meditatively sipped, while contemplating the simmer-ring challenge . . . .

. . . in which (whoops!) I already appear to have invested thirty-seven quid or so. Mmmm.
« Last Edit: 09:40:47, 15/03/18 by shoarthing »

Tin

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Re: Cooking Fuels & Stove Types
« Reply #24 on: 09:24:20, 15/03/18 »
Have carefully emptied the tonic out of the can - entirely to accelerate the simmer-ring process - onto the gin (and some ice) and meditavely sipped, while contemplating the simmer-ring challenge . . . .


Happy fettling! ;)


I drive my wife and daughter nuts asking them if their deodorant cans are empty yet. ;D

shoarthing

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Re: Cooking Fuels & Stove Types
« Reply #25 on: 09:33:27, 15/03/18 »

Happy fettling! ;)


I drive my wife and daughter nuts asking them if their deodorant cans are empty yet. ;D
¡Ha! . . . . the watched deoderant never empties . .   


What’s the fancy feast like in practical use? When I saw one, I was dead impressed by how light it was, & cautious as to its durability in use. Do you keep it in a rigid container? If so, what does the stove/container combo weigh? The Ti Evernew clone is tough as boots; if not featherlight . . . .

Tin

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Re: Cooking Fuels & Stove Types
« Reply #26 on: 09:46:08, 15/03/18 »
¡Ha! . . . . the watched deoderant never empties . .   


What’s the fancy feast like in practical use? When I saw one, I was dead impressed by how light it was, & cautious as to its durability in use. Do you keep it in a rigid container? If so, what does the stove/container combo weigh? The Ti Evernew clone is tough as boots; if not featherlight . . . .


I've never weighed it but will do after work today. They do seem a little flimsy before the first test burn but after that they become more rigid, saying that I still keep it in a small tupperware pot. I did use 10mm thick carbon felt so that probably helped give it more solidity.

shoarthing

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Re: Cooking Fuels & Stove Types
« Reply #27 on: 09:55:18, 15/03/18 »
Yup, it *looked* as tho’ a sane user would reach for the tupperware. The Ti thing is OK in a bag - it comes in a silnylon drawstring pouch. What do you carry daywalk/overnighter fuel in? For longer jaunts I have a couple of sizes of Trangia bottles, but have been eyeing-up a Nalgene HDPE “4 oz” bottle . . . .

Tin

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Re: Cooking Fuels & Stove Types
« Reply #28 on: 14:44:45, 15/03/18 »

I only have kitchen scales so not sure how accurate they are at these weights.

Fancy feast stove - 26g
Storage pot - 44g


I've never been a gram counter but I dug out one of my old beer can burners and it was 10g. Even though I enjoyed making them they suffer from cold pot kill and I had to hold the pot over the stove for quite awhile before placing it on top of the stove. I just carried on using my gas stove and gave up on alcohol stoves.


Now that I have grandkids showing an interest I decided to move from my bivvy bag and onto using a tent, so tried making a more practical alcohol stove to save weight whilst saving up for a tent. (still saving :( )


I vape and mix my own e-liquid so use spare bottles for my meths, 30ml or 100ml, these are lab grade so perfect for meths.



Tin

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Re: Cooking Fuels & Stove Types
« Reply #29 on: 21:07:37, 15/03/18 »
As I had everything out I did a boil test and my fancy feast stove had a rolling boil at 6:00 mins and run out out 12:00 with 30ml of meths, so if I can sort out a simmer ring I hope be able to get at least 30 mins cooking time and then I can have more options cooking food than just rehydrating meals.


I also tested my old beer/soda can stove which bloomed at 3:28 (I held my pot over the stove the whole time to avoid the cold pot kill) then put the pot on stove. Rolling boil at 10:29 and run out at 13:25.