Author Topic: Cows and horse  (Read 864 times)

Toxicbunny

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Cows and horse
« on: 12:57:13, 16/05/18 »
I do a lot of walking, it's that time of year that a lot of bullocks and cows are in the fields. I walk with a dog so far I have legged it like Usain bolt after a herd of 30 horses perused me. Any advice on the law on this. My dogs always on leash where any animals are. I don't run less I'm what I consider in danger but it's off putting.

Mel

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Re: Cows and horse
« Reply #1 on: 13:36:51, 16/05/18 »
If they just perused you (looked at you) then running was probably a bad thing to do.


Did you mean pursued (followed you)?


Lots of topics previously on this forum covering how to deal with crossing fields with livestock in. Type in the word "cows" in the search box at the top of the page  O0
No expense spared in pursuit of a bargain ;)
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Toxicbunny

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Re: Cows and horse
« Reply #2 on: 14:12:15, 16/05/18 »
If they just perused you (looked at you) then running was probably a bad thing to do.


Did you mean pursued (followed you)?


Lots of topics previously on this forum covering how to deal with crossing fields with livestock in. Type in the word "cows" in the search box at the top of the page  O0

The horses ran at me full speed otherwise I would not have ran. If I did not run I would most definitely been trampled.

harry_keogh

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Re: Cows and horse
« Reply #3 on: 15:01:52, 16/05/18 »
Horses are evil.


PembsWalker

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Re: Cows and horse
« Reply #5 on: 21:50:14, 16/05/18 »
The advice I've read recently is to let your dog's lead go and run. Logically it makes sense, but I can see why dog owners wouldn't want to do that.

Walktall

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Re: Cows and horse
« Reply #6 on: 22:00:46, 16/05/18 »
You must let your dog of the lead for your own safety. 

gunwharfman

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Re: Cows and horse
« Reply #7 on: 09:21:05, 17/05/18 »
I've had problems with cows, dogs and pigs but never horses. I've also had the odd problem with seagulls and once with sheep. A sheep nicked a sandwich from my hand on Mam Tor. However I take the view that I wouldn't want to sanitise the world so that these animals are kept out of our lives, they have been here as long as we have possibly. Surely past generations must have had similar problems, possibly even worse? I assume large sections of the population before the car, had a more direct relationship with such animals, farming, transport and so on. For me, the only place I  know of where farmers seem to make an effort to segregate such animals from hikers is in France. I have rarely walked there and shared the same field with either cows or horses.

barewirewalker

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Re: Cows and horse
« Reply #8 on: 10:30:14, 17/05/18 »
Gunwharfman's post only pinpoints part of the problem. Yes more people are going into the countryside, who are unfamiliar with animals, but there are less people involved with agriculture today so the livestock have less interaction with people. When I was at agricultural college I remember being told, during an animal husbandry lecture, that we would not come across single suckler herds as they were not economic, most of those animals were handled twice a day and individually fed by a herdsman. Now single suckler herds are common, they calve down often unsupervised, rear their calves in a herd environment and the bull runs in the herd throughout the cycle, this is carried out without the day to day intervention of a stockman.
A dog owner would be well advised to release their dog if the find themselves within the herd space. A simple remedy would be for temporary diversions, but the CLA are against this because it would show alternate ways. They would advocate temporary suspensions on safety grounds, yet alternate ways using other field margins is a logical extension of the rights of network as the taxpayer pours huge amounts of money into the countryside for conservation support by way of field margins.
The leisure industry is an established fact and a growing factor in out economy, safety is important but landowners still cling to ideas from before the 20th century as we are entering the 21st. Limousin cattle were introduced over 30 years ago, one of the best kept secrets in the agricultural industry is about their temperament, yet the regulations about the type of cattle allowed where there are rights of way has not been altered since the 1940's, or perhaps even earlier.
Big blocks of countryside are unsuitable for leisure walking, because there are no RoWs within the areas, despite long footpaths being mapped by the OS pre-1949. Much of these areas are purely arable, yet the landowners will not admit their predecessors corrupted the Definitive Map and left off great swathes of our countryside that could provide alternative ways.
Walkers would be well advised to understand livestock, females animals become tetchy when they come into season, usually docile and friendly mares will be different in character, safety laws require the need to recognize potential risk and take action but landowners think that banning people from the countryside is the answer. A small paddock used to keep tups (rams) separate from ewes should be seen as a special risk as tups will butt forcefully at a point where a broken femur is possible. How often do your see such a warning posted, yet a ruling in court makes known risk the property owners responsibility even if the is no public access.
Yes there is some risk with livestock about, walkers should stand firm on their right on be in the countryside, but it is quite clear that the policies pursued by landowners has stopped the agricultural industry keeping pace with the needs of the 21st century in developing the full potential of the access network.


On the other hand irresponsible dog ownership, which I believed should NOT be part of the access issue, is serious public disorder, misdemeanor even criminal behaviour. Owning a dog liable to cause damage to livestock is a potential risk that the dog owner should carry full responsibility for.
« Last Edit: 10:55:19, 17/05/18 by barewirewalker »
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Jac

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Re: Cows and horse
« Reply #9 on: 12:16:41, 17/05/18 »
The only time I had to let my dog off the lead because of gallumphing great bullocks cavorting round us she clamped herself to my left leg and gave a display of perfect heelwork which would have won us a cup at Crufts.

That footpath is now a beautifully smooth tarmac cyclepath. No bullocks but no off lead dog or small child would be safe from the would-be Bradley Ws.
Most walks start by finding the way out of the car park

MichaelUK

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Re: Cows and horse
« Reply #10 on: 13:08:47, 17/05/18 »
Cows! Rabbits are the worst, and hunt in packs! Those teeth are like razors. Been chased many times by the [censored], fortunately they never caught me, certainly made my legs shake!!!!!

MichaelUK

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Re: Cows and horse
« Reply #11 on: 13:09:12, 17/05/18 »
Must stop my dog using my PC

dartmoorrambler

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Re: Cows and horse
« Reply #12 on: 21:36:21, 17/05/18 »
I grew up on a working farm and handled all sorts of livestock. Educating the public is the only solution to sharing our lovely countryside.
Beef bulls with cows are usually very docile as long as you keep your distance. If they start rolling their eyes, keep out of the field.
Cows with the newborn calves are the most dangerous of all UK livestock. The cow will often leave the new calf hidden in the long grass while she watches from some distance away. Never get between the cow and her new calf - she will charge you. If you are in this situation retreat with calf directly between you and the cow. She will stand over the calf and won't follow you. The exception is if you have a dog. Cows will chase a dog. Bullocks will chase a dog. If any livestock starts chasing your dog let it off the lead and you must chase your dog away from you. You do not want a dog cowering behind you with a herd of hefty bullocks in hot pursuit.
Never corner an animal by a gate or in a lane. Always give it an escape route. If it does panic and it is cornered it will charge back down the lane through a group of people. Get out of its way. It won't stop.

Pigs will bite. Children are particularly at risk. They have very powerful jaws - much more than any dog.

Horses are very sensitive to gestures, movement, even expressions. Don't run from them - they will race you. Don't feed them unless they belong to you. Horses that get fed by the public can get too fond of being fed and can get too assertive.

For most farm animals, don't startle them. Talk to them from a distance so that they know you are there. Smile, and continue talking to them as you go past.

Toxicbunny

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Re: Cows and horse
« Reply #13 on: 23:37:29, 17/05/18 »
I have come across an app called path watch. It is also available on the PC you do not need to be a member of the ramblers association to use it and can report anonymously if you wish to. You can report damaged styles plus problems with animals. I have reported the herd of horses that makes one of the walks inaccessible I use. It makes no difference so I have been told if you get chased if you have a dog or not. My dog is always on leash. I personally can't understand anyone who would have a dog off leash with lifestock accept a farmer of course. I would not let my dog off leash chased by livestock. Whilst dog owners should keep their dogs under control I feel farmers have a right to keep livestock under control where there are public rights of way too.

gunwharfman

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Re: Cows and horse
« Reply #14 on: 12:03:29, 18/05/18 »
To Jac - I'm planning to cycle camp from Portsmouth to Maidstone next week to see my sister. I'm go there via Crawley, the Worth Way and I think its called the Forest Trail, its a disused railway line and goes towards Tunbridge Wells. I then plan to go north on the Wealdway (I've read its also a cycle path? I hope so) to Mereworth woods and I'll then vere off to Maidstone.

I am hoping to come back a different route so when I saw your words 'smooth tarmac' I thought, is it long enough and in the right place for me to use it on my way home? At the moment my plan is to pedal south, on the Wealdway again, going south and then join up to the South Downs Way to get home.

I haven't decided fully yet but 'smooth tarmac' sounds very nice. We have a smooth tarmac route near us from Havant to the edge of Portsmouth which runs along the top edge of Farlington Marshes but its only about 2 miles long and it runs parallel to the motorway so cyclists have to 'enjoy' the pollution as well.