Author Topic: Trail food?  (Read 2430 times)

richardh1905

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Re: Trail food?
« Reply #30 on: 17:38:05, 12/06/18 »

Have you considered oatcakes? Ideal with squirty cheese, and over 500 calories/100g.


Also, to avoid the nuts, make up your own trail mix with dried fruit, pumpkin seeds and sunflower seeds.

Ralph

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Re: Trail food?
« Reply #31 on: 17:45:57, 12/06/18 »
Squirty cheese on cheese oatcakes has been my fave for a long time.

richardh1905

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Re: Trail food?
« Reply #32 on: 17:59:03, 12/06/18 »
Now we're talking!

Ralph

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Re: Trail food?
« Reply #33 on: 18:13:36, 12/06/18 »
At home I have cheese oatcakes with my morning boiled eggs, delicious.

alan de enfield

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Re: Trail food?
« Reply #34 on: 06:40:44, 16/06/18 »
Rye bread is available in Lidl. Goes well with pickled herring and curried egg!



Review on Aldi (NOT Lidl) Rye bread.


Pros :
500 gram vacuum sealed pack
0.89
7 months Best Before Date
500g pack = 1000 Kcals
Saturated Fat = 0.2g per 100g
Sugar = 2.9g per 100g


Cons:
Not a 'high' source of calories at 200Kcal/100g (Typical Flapjack 550Kcal for a 125g bar)
Taste - OK, but not an overly pleasant taste 'on its own', adding cheese &/or butter defeats the 'low fat' option
Texture - compressed seed droppings from the bottom of a bird cage.


Conclusion :


For the weight and bulk of it compared to the benefits I'll stick with other alternatives.

Owen

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Re: Trail food?
« Reply #35 on: 11:22:08, 16/06/18 »
It's 82p for a 800g loaf in waitrose.


I appreciate adding cheese won't fit your particular dietary requirements, but the OP was asking for suggestions for savory snacks so rye bread and cheese does fit the bill. Taste and texture is a very personal thing some people won't like it others will.

KimE

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Re: Trail food?
« Reply #36 on: 12:21:42, 16/06/18 »

[font=]"At a meeting a few weeks later he asked what everyone thought of the Herring - most had thrown the cans in the waste, when asked why, they explained that the cans had 'expanded' and had 'blown' into the shape of a football."[/font]
[font=]
[/font]
[font=]Yes they expand if you dont keep them cold the fish are still wounderful. Norway have a different kind of fermented fish called Rakfisk.[/font]

KimE

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Re: Trail food?
« Reply #37 on: 12:33:06, 16/06/18 »
[font=]Pros :[/font][font=&amp]
[font=]500 gram vacuum sealed pack[/font][font=&amp]
[font=]0.89[/font][font=&amp]
[font=]7 months Best Before Date[/font][font=&amp]
[font=]500g pack = 1000 Kcals[/font][font=&amp]
[font=]Saturated Fat = 0.2g per 100g[/font][font=&amp]
[font=]Sugar = 2.9g per 100g[/font][font=&amp]
[font=]Cons:[/font][font=&amp]
[font=]Not a 'high' source of calories at 200Kcal/100g (Typical Flapjack 550Kcal for a 125g bar)[/font][font=&amp]
[font=]Taste - OK, but not an overly pleasant taste 'on its own', adding cheese &/or butter defeats the 'low fat' option[/font][font=&amp]
[font=]Texture - compressed seed droppings from the bottom of a bird cage.[/font]
[font=]
[/font]
[font=]
[/font]
[font=]No rye bread are not very energy compact , it have a long best before date, my shop bought dry rye bread have one year but its much longer if its stored properly. I eat my grandmothers home made thin bread 3 years after its baked. More energy packed are grain bars and nuts but its not asked for in this thread.[/font]
[font=]
[/font]
[font=] http://www.wasa-usa.com/products/crispbread/whole-grain/
[/font]

dittzzy

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Re: Trail food?
« Reply #38 on: 19:01:20, 16/06/18 »
Doesn't answer the original request, but I LUUUUURRRRRVE Eccles Cakes. Excellent trail food, except they crumble, so you have to eat them up sooner rather than later.  (Shame innit,  :D )

Pennine Way Virgin

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Re: Trail food?
« Reply #39 on: 12:42:49, 18/06/18 »
I have recently fallen in love with a brand called 'Look what we Found' who make long life meals in a pouch; chilli con carne, meatballs, chicken casterole etc.  They are very similar to camping meals, they are tasty, can be boiled in the bag and will last for months, they are maybe not quite as calorie dense as made for purpose camping meals but they are a fraction of the price,  I normally pair them with a packet of cheap precooked rice for a more substantial evening meal.  I have seen them in several supermarkets, I pick mine up from Morrison's for just under 1.50 each, but if you google the brand name you will see they are pretty common and popular with outdoor enthusiasts.
« Last Edit: 12:46:28, 18/06/18 by Pennine Way Virgin »

Pennine Way Virgin

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Re: Trail food?
« Reply #40 on: 12:44:15, 18/06/18 »
Doesn't answer the original request, but I LUUUUURRRRRVE Eccles Cakes. Excellent trail food, except they crumble, so you have to eat them up sooner rather than later.  (Shame innit,  :D )


Or flies graveyards as my old Granny used to call them  ;D

NeilC

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Re: Trail food?
« Reply #41 on: 13:34:15, 18/06/18 »
I have recently fallen in love with a brand called 'Look what we Found' who make long life meals in a pouch; chilli con carne, meatballs, chicken casterole etc.  They are very similar to camping meals, they are tasty, can be boiled in the bag and will last for months, they are maybe not quite as calorie dense as made for purpose camping meals but they are a fraction of the price,  I normally pair them with a packet of cheap precooked rice for a more substantial evening meal.  I have seen them in several supermarkets, I pick mine up from Morrison's for just under 1.50 each, but if you google the brand name you will see they are pretty common and popular with outdoor enthusiasts.


Yes I like these too - much nicer quality than most camping brands.


I do the oatcakes like a others on here. I tend to carry a Lidl goats cheese and a piece of Chorizo to have with them. Chorizo is very high in cals for the weight and a great way of adding flavour to most savoury meals.

alan de enfield

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Re: Trail food?
« Reply #42 on: 13:52:00, 18/06/18 »
I have recently fallen in love with a brand called 'Look what we Found' who make long life meals in a pouch; chilli con carne, meatballs, chicken casterole etc.  They are very similar to camping meals, they are tasty, can be boiled in the bag and will last for months, they are maybe not quite as calorie dense as made for purpose camping meals but they are a fraction of the price,  I normally pair them with a packet of cheap precooked rice for a more substantial evening meal.  I have seen them in several supermarkets, I pick mine up from Morrison's for just under 1.50 each, but if you google the brand name you will see they are pretty common and popular with outdoor enthusiasts.



Yes they are available at between 1.50 & 3.00 per pack.
the issues I have with them are :


Portion / bag size is 250g
Calories per portion / bag is around 200.


So for an equivalent meal to a de-hydrated 800Kcal meal you need to buy 4 of them (and carry 1000g) as compared to 150g bag of de-hydrated food. Yes you can 'add something' to them but that is all weight carried.


Burning off much higher than normal calories hiking with a pack in hot weather needs additional calories to your normal intake.


When one 250Kcal meal weighs almost twice an 800Kcal meal I think the choice is easy.

jimbob

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Re: Trail food?
« Reply #43 on: 13:57:34, 18/06/18 »
Again Alan that choice is only suitable if not having to carry water. I tend to carry only energy bars and eat when I come across a caff or a pub. I have no great problem with hunger and I carry too much fat anyway so I know I am not going to die of starvation in a week or less.In fact  I usually put weight on. I blame the warm fizzy stuff you get with southern pub meals.
Too little, too late, too bad......

NeilC

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Re: Trail food?
« Reply #44 on: 14:13:44, 18/06/18 »
I'm also in the position where not fulfilling my calorific needs is a very good thing indeed

Obviously dried foods makes sense where water is freely available but where it isn't then it makes no difference as you're carrying that water one way or another. In fact I can't count the number of times I've carefully saved a few hundred grams with dried food only to get to camp where there is a source of water but I've still got 1000g of water still undrunk sitting my pack.

For short trips the pouches (or tins really since tins don't actually weigh that much anyway) can work well.