Author Topic: Whistle?  (Read 795 times)

jimbob

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Whistle?
« on: 14:57:32, 22/06/18 »
I always carry a whistle, because, well just because I was told to in the scouts. I have never used said article.
On chatting to some folks on a hike recently they stated they wouldn't recognise the sound of a distress call on a whistle.

You know what I'm not sure I would either, given the background noise and just general lack of awareness on my behalf, I am a total daydreamer when walking.  (Heaven knows the extra miles I've walked past turnings which on trekking back were clearly obvious :o )
So given that I now carry a mobile phone and a GPS to give exact positions to anyone if I was in distress, do I really need to carry a whistle? I probably will continue to do so because they are so insignificant weight wise, and I wouldn't like it to come up in a coroners court that I didn't have one and have people on this or other like forums criticising my stupidity.

So the only reason I see for one is my fear of criticism rather than feeling them to be helpful.
Too little, too late, too bad......

gunwharfman

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Re: Whistle?
« Reply #1 on: 15:24:42, 22/06/18 »
I too carry a whistle but have never used it. I also have a mobile and I also carry a couple of 130db personal alarms as well, one of which I use just to secure my rucksack to my tent overnight.

As a child I also learned how to whistle loudly with two fingers in my mouth and can still do it now.

adalard

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Re: Whistle?
« Reply #2 on: 15:28:02, 22/06/18 »
I do carry one.


Specific distress signal aside, I would think you could make a racket with it that might stand out more than just shouting and take less effort. That could still help if the MRT are searching for you.

richardh1905

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Re: Whistle?
« Reply #3 on: 15:32:39, 22/06/18 »
I too carry a whistle and thankfully have never had to use it.


And I will continue to do so, as mobile phones cannot be relied upon in the hills, and I go to some pretty remote places.


P.S. To save weight, I've just swapped my metal "acme thunderer" for a plastic whistle that I scavenged from an old lifejacket that was being scrapped; about half the weight.

ninthace

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Re: Whistle?
« Reply #4 on: 15:47:47, 22/06/18 »
I carry a WW2 aircrew whistle, complete with Air Ministry crown and part no. It was my father’s and since he, too, was a keen walker it serves as both alarm and keepsake. It can be heard in the next county, unlike the one built into my rucksack chest strap.
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dittzzy

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Re: Whistle?
« Reply #5 on: 23:00:03, 22/06/18 »
I have my little plastic whistle, with a small torch, and a head torch, always in my pack.   I often look at all the sink holes, hushes, mine shafts and crevices around me when I walk around the Dales, and wonder if the ground beneath my feet is as safe as I think it is. 

A whistle might be handy if you were in a bit of a hole, as it where.   On the grounds you've told someone where you are going, and they know where to look.

 :) :)

marmottungsten

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Re: Whistle?
« Reply #6 on: 23:19:35, 23/06/18 »
I too carry a whistle but have never used it. I also have a mobile and I also carry a couple of 130db personal alarms as well, one of which I use just to secure my rucksack to my tent overnight.

As a child I also learned how to whistle loudly with two fingers in my mouth and can still do it now.


Luckily, I can do the same, but without having to use my fingers, which comes in handy now and then, usually when attracting someones attention at a distance.  I realise that the majority of people cannot do this and for these people therefore, whistles can still have a place. 
However, when you think about it, carrying a whistle nowadays is just a throwback to the past.  Think back to the time before the invention of the Silicone chip, which allowed the miniaturisation of electronics, which in turn allowed every Police constable in the land to carry a personal two way radio...Back then every Police constable carried a whistle with them as the primary means of getting attention from other local bobbies in the vicinity...But it has now been decades since this practice ended...So long ago that I seriously doubt any Police officers today would even respond to hearing someone blowing a whistle...I'm afraid those days are long gone, so I wouldn't put much trust in carrying one. 

Mel

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Re: Whistle?
« Reply #7 on: 23:42:35, 23/06/18 »
I have a plastic whistle that came with one of my rucksacks.


I think, if I was out on the hills, I'd be more inclined to take notice of a whistle from a whistle (if you get what I mean!) rather than a pursed lips or fingers whistle, which I'd probably assume was farmer with his sheepdog or someone simply whistling for their dog.



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adalard

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Re: Whistle?
« Reply #8 on: 00:10:14, 24/06/18 »
I agree with Mel. I think context is important here.


I'm quite sure the police wouldn't respond to a whistle in a residential or urban setting as it's been superseded by other methods and technologies, as you point out - and I suspect life is perhaps just noisier generally in populated areas than it was 60 odd years ago.


But in the hills it's a different matter. And I'd certainly expect MRT to be aware of the whistle even if casual walkers weren't.

Deolman

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Re: Whistle?
« Reply #9 on: 07:01:58, 24/06/18 »
As I understand it six short blasts of the whistle followed by a minutes rest. The response from someone hearing it is three blasts. Had to use mine to direct a paramedic to my location in the middle of a field following a suspected heart attack.  I also understand, and correct me if I am wrong, that there are international recognised hand signals to communicate with rescue helicopters. Arms stretched upwards in a ‘V’ shape indicating ‘Yes’ I need assistance and raise your right arm up at 45 degrees and the left arm down at 45 degrees to signal that you do not need assistance.

dittzzy

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Re: Whistle?
« Reply #10 on: 22:37:17, 24/06/18 »
As I understand it six short blasts of the whistle followed by a minutes rest. The response from someone hearing it is three blasts. Had to use mine to direct a paramedic to my location in the middle of a field following a suspected heart attack.  I also understand, and correct me if I am wrong, that there are international recognised hand signals to communicate with rescue helicopters. Arms stretched upwards in a ‘V’ shape indicating ‘Yes’ I need assistance and raise your right arm up at 45 degrees and the left arm down at 45 degrees to signal that you do not need assistance.
According to the instructions on the inside of the top flap of my Alpine Pro rucksack, you are absolutely right Deolman.  It also gives me the emergency numbers for several countries (Europe, USA etc.). 

(Just hope I have it with me when I need it.  It's got me whistle and me torch as well!)

Deolman

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Re: Whistle?
« Reply #11 on: 05:27:48, 25/06/18 »
I have a rucksack with the same information. It would be good if all rucksack manufacturers did the same.