Author Topic: Why are shoes/boots not human foot shaped?  (Read 2192 times)

Ronin83

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Re: Why are shoes/boots not human foot shaped?
« Reply #30 on: 15:32:24, 30/01/19 »
Now, you see, I have problems with the modern trend to big wide toe boxes. Pretty much any shoes or boots I try nowadays leave my toes loose and I get no sense of security from them when doing anything other than walking on the flat.


Firstly, there is NO trend to making spacious toe boxes in anything other than very specific footwear.


Secondly, there is no benefit, but a lot of problems with having your toes 'secured'.


Toes should be free to splay naturally and wiggle to keep blood flow healthy. Other parts of the foot can be secured for stability, but toes need to do what they do.
If you feel insecure without snugness/pressure on your toes then youve developed a very unnatural and unhealthy feeling.


As a domesticated human like the rest of the general population, I am, unfortunately, reliant on a certain level of protection on my feet. ItsIa shame, but it's the way it is.
Barefoot shoes are a difficult thing to get used to.
Personally I love the shape and wide toe boxes, but the thin soles are a problem for me.

archaeoroutes

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Re: Why are shoes/boots not human foot shaped?
« Reply #31 on: 22:19:46, 31/01/19 »
I was merely pointing out that everyone has different feet, and whatever happens to the 'standard' shoe design, some people aren't going to like it.


For shoes to simply walk the streets in, I have no problem with loose toes. However, if I'm doing anything serious I need the shoe/boot to fit my foot and not slip around. If it doesn't fit at the toe, then I don't get the connection between surface and foot I need for security. At worst, my foot slips around and I can't deal with any scrambling - try stepping on a small hold when there's a gap between your foot and the edge of the boot. Even on level ground, if I get a boot of the right length, I find nowadays that I frequently have to tie the laces painfully tight to stop the feeling the boot's about to fall off. That is particularly worrying on rough tracks.
Walking routes visiting ancient sites in Britain's uplands: http://www.archaeoroutes.co.uk

Ronin83

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Re: Why are shoes/boots not human foot shaped?
« Reply #32 on: 14:44:17, 01/02/19 »
I was merely pointing out that everyone has different feet, and whatever happens to the 'standard' shoe design, some people aren't going to like it.


For shoes to simply walk the streets in, I have no problem with loose toes. However, if I'm doing anything serious I need the shoe/boot to fit my foot and not slip around. If it doesn't fit at the toe, then I don't get the connection between surface and foot I need for security. At worst, my foot slips around and I can't deal with any scrambling - try stepping on a small hold when there's a gap between your foot and the edge of the boot. Even on level ground, if I get a boot of the right length, I find nowadays that I frequently have to tie the laces painfully tight to stop the feeling the boot's about to fall off. That is particularly worrying on rough tracks.


You keep mentioning your FOOT slipping around. This has nothing to do with the toe box at all. Space in front of your toes is recommended by all boot fitters to prevent stubbing. That said, if space in front is the problem this has nothing to do with a WIDE toe box anyway.
With regards to "toeing" a small hold, as a climber, I can understand the need for a close fitting shoe, but serious mountain boots get around this by having rigid soles near the toes.


I mean hey, if thatsthow you like it then fine, up to you, but it's really not healthy for your feet, especially over long distances

archaeoroutes

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Re: Why are shoes/boots not human foot shaped?
« Reply #33 on: 17:12:14, 01/02/19 »
My proper 4-season boots are fine, as you say. But then I haven't had to replace any of those in a few years.
I am also fine with very flexible synthetic boots which conform to my feet like elastic.
My problem is with (mostly) leather boots which have a stiff upper that leaves large gaps to the side and above my toes. And by toes it seems to be from the bottom of the laces down. I've had quite a few of my reliable go-to models that I trashed the life out of at work and needed to replace every couple of years suddenly stop letting me do things as easily as I had (like scrambling up a delicate rocky bit after ten miles tabbing across Dartmoor) and when I measured them the only difference was a larger toe box.


I don't want my toes cramping up, or being squashed. What I want is a boot that responds. With the larger box, I am aware of the slight time lag between lifting my toes off the bottom of the boot and the sole of the boot leaving the ground. That is very disconcerting as the boot no longer feels like it is an extension of my foot and I no longer trust it, not even to drive where the delay lifting off the accelerator feels like an age. I'd liken it to skiing vs mountain-biking - I could hurl myself down all sorts of things on skis because they were an extension of me but I was scared to go down most slopes on a bike because it was just something I was sat on (yeah, serious mountain bikers are going to have quibbles with the analogy as for them the bike is part of them, but for me it is true).
Walking routes visiting ancient sites in Britain's uplands: http://www.archaeoroutes.co.uk

Ronin83

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Re: Why are shoes/boots not human foot shaped?
« Reply #34 on: 09:40:10, 03/02/19 »
I totally understand where youreycoming from now with the extension of your body analogy. I feel the same way which Is what briefly led me down the path of barefoot shoes. They did provide that sensory feedback, but severely lacked in quality and protection.
Id like to just skip around in dainty fitted shoes(I guess trainers?), but they'd just never survive the deep mud, clay, chalk, rain and rocks.


If only there was a boot which converts between a comfy rambler to a fitted stiff  rambler. Unfortunately magic doesn't exist  ;D


But yes, I completely see where youre coming from now

WILDWALKINGUK

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Re: Why are shoes/boots not human foot shaped?
« Reply #35 on: 17:31:45, 06/02/19 »
Hello
Try Altra Lone Peak 4 Mid if you want a wide toe box, very impressed with them so far.
I have found on long hikes I've done (Cape Wrath Trail and TGO Challenge) that my feet spread wearing trainer type boots like the Inov8 rocklite 325 and my toes start to rub after a week or 2 so later this month I will be starting my LEJOG (1300miles) ish in some Inov8 roclite 345 GTX knowing the tread will wear down before the end, I will then change into my Altra Lone Peak 4 mid to give my toes more room. They are noticeable wider in the toe box.
Mark 

GinAndPlatonic

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Re: Why are shoes/boots not human foot shaped?
« Reply #36 on: 12:42:13, 07/02/19 »
I wear Anatom Q2 boots most of the time now. I think many people might would find the soles a tad thin. The soles are Vibram though & give a lot of flex. The leather upper is soft and they have a fairly wide toe box. They are waterproof & that`s the clincher for me. I use Neats foot oil most of the time, even with it`s reputation for overly softening leather......I always say to myself nowadays. I want the boot to be comfortable from the get go and not need to be broken in by my valuable and supremely constructed feet, which mother nature has taken eons to perfect..
I have noticed that some stiff thorns have entered the soles in places and I get the feeling they could go straight through in certain circumstances. I will live with that possibility though as I enjoy the feel of the ground under my feet and think it gives me greater control of my steps and grip on slopes too.They are not exactly  fashion icons either but I love `em.

Percy

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Re: Why are shoes/boots not human foot shaped?
« Reply #37 on: 14:40:41, 14/02/19 »
Hello
Try Altra Lone Peak 4 Mid if you want a wide toe box, very impressed with them so far.
I have found on long hikes I've done (Cape Wrath Trail and TGO Challenge) that my feet spread wearing trainer type boots like the Inov8 rocklite 325 and my toes start to rub after a week or 2 so later this month I will be starting my LEJOG (1300miles) ish in some Inov8 roclite 345 GTX knowing the tread will wear down before the end, I will then change into my Altra Lone Peak 4 mid to give my toes more room. They are noticeable wider in the toe box.
Mark
I've been looking at the Lone Peak's for a number of months and I finally took the plunge. They were waiting for me when I got home yesterday. I've only pottered about in the them but I'm really impressed with how comfortable and light they are. I have wide feet so was attracted by the wider toe box. Outside of bad weather conditions (winter or very, very wet) I've moved away from leather boots to trainers/trail running shoes the last few years and think the Altra's will be a big favourite of mine.