Author Topic: Uncooperative walking companion  (Read 1770 times)

Hillhiker1

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Re: Uncooperative walking companion
« Reply #15 on: 22:06:41, 05/07/18 »
I often think in the Lakes, PD,  Snowdonia etc you're alone.. But you're not. Sit down and wait 10 minutes. You'll usually find it's actually very busy..

richardh1905

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Re: Uncooperative walking companion
« Reply #16 on: 23:25:32, 05/07/18 »

... The way I saw it it was safety in numbers. Say one of us slipped an injured ourselves and didn't have phone battery/signal. One could take a map ref and hike out to the nearest settlement.


I worried about that when I was younger (a lot younger), having had it drummed into me that it was unsafe to go hillwalking alone unless you were 'experienced', but I found going on my first solo walk in the mountains to be a liberating and confidence building experience, and I haven't looked back; still embarking upon solo adventures 34 years later  :)

Sure, accidents can happen, but as long as you equip yourself properly, know your limitations and leave details of your planned route with someone, you are unlikely to come to grief.






Strenuousness is the path of immortality, sloth the path of death.

Ridge

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Re: Uncooperative walking companion
« Reply #17 on: 01:50:30, 06/07/18 »
Sure, accidents can happen, but as long as you equip yourself properly, know your limitations and leave details of your planned route with someone, you are unlikely to come to grief.
and in most popular places (Lakes, Dales, Peaks) you'll be very lucky to go for half an hour without seeing someone.
Over hill, over dale. Thorough brush, thorough brier....
I do wander every where

staggerindragon

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Re: Uncooperative walking companion
« Reply #18 on: 04:50:17, 06/07/18 »
So much evidence for my long-held theory that it's much harder to find a good walking partner than a good marriage partner.

Jac

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Re: Uncooperative walking companion
« Reply #19 on: 08:27:33, 06/07/18 »
So much evidence for my long-held theory that it's much harder to find a good walking partner than a good marriage partner.

Now there I have to differ :(
Most walks start by finding the way out of the car park

ninthace

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Re: Uncooperative walking companion
« Reply #20 on: 09:48:09, 06/07/18 »
So much evidence for my long-held theory that it's much harder to find a good walking partner than a good marriage partner.


I married mine, 45 years together next month. Mind you she still doesnít like going up hill but that balances out because I donít like going down hill much these days. We are both still good at the bits in between though.


On a serious note, because we know each other so well, we can plan walks that suit both of us which leads to a more companionable outing. Also, she trusts me to navigate so there are no arguments on that score.
Solvitur Ambulando

Nomad32

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Re: Uncooperative walking companion
« Reply #21 on: 10:42:09, 06/07/18 »

I married mine, 45 years together next month. Mind you she still doesnít like going up hill but that balances out because I donít like going down hill much these days. We are both still good at the bits in between though.



On a serious note, because we know each other so well, we can plan walks that suit both of us which leads to a more companionable outing. Also, she trusts me to navigate so there are no arguments on that score.


There is no problem when I take my fiancee. She trusts me to plan the walk and read the map. We love our weekends away.

pleb

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Re: Uncooperative walking companion
« Reply #22 on: 10:49:05, 06/07/18 »
All my walks this year so far have been solo.

Islandplodder

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Re: Uncooperative walking companion
« Reply #23 on: 11:21:45, 06/07/18 »

Don't write off all walking companions because of one (or even two) bad experiences.  There are friends you can walk with and friends you can't.
My sticking points are:  that we both like to set off early, that we walk at similar speeds and are comfortable with similar distances, and that we can discuss differences of opinion on navigation until we come to an agreement.  I sometimes walk with my brother who is always convinced that he knows the way, and is almost always wrong.  Over the years I have managed to convince even a big brother that the map is right!   
In the end, if you have real differences, probably the only thing to do is to stand your ground and say that you want to continue on the planned route and you'll meet them later at the pub/campsite or whatever.  That usually brings people round, and if it doesn't you'll have a peaceful walk for the rest of the day, so it's win-win!

staggerindragon

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Re: Uncooperative walking companion
« Reply #24 on: 02:40:59, 07/07/18 »
Awww  :smitten:


That's great to hear, Jac and Ninthace!

Doddy

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Re: Uncooperative walking companion
« Reply #25 on: 18:26:56, 09/07/18 »

He travels fastest who travels alone. Rudyard Kipling.
I am reading "Grit is a four letter word" by Ann Gimpel. One of the many good things she says is"Never to walk with someone you cannot trust" this after leaving the choice of tent to a colleague and they had cold nights with the wrong gear.

dittzzy

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Re: Uncooperative walking companion
« Reply #26 on: 00:21:54, 10/07/18 »
 
So much evidence for my long-held theory that it's much harder to find a good walking partner than a good marriage partner.
My favourite walking partner is my hubby, we get along just perfect.   Sometimes the route is mine, sometimes his.  Sometimes I map read, sometimes he does, sometimes I correct him.   ;D ;D
Only time I've been out walking with anyone "uncooperative" was when I joined a meet in the Lakes where I knew the others were fitter and faster than me, but they told me that it didn't matter that I walked slowly, it would be fine.  I just couldn't keep up with them, and they weren't slowing down because of me.  I told them to go on without me and they did.   Lesson learnt!
I've been out walking with quite a few other members of this forum, and they have all been excellent companions, as have the few friends that I have taken out with me.  (Although a couple haven't joined me for second go........ perhaps I'm the uncooperative one??  ??? )
I suppose it's down to establishing the expectations at the beginning of the walk.

BuzyG

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Re: Uncooperative walking companion
« Reply #27 on: 01:08:50, 10/07/18 »
Not a issue I have had to deal with.  Walking in a large group I'm very happy to mingle and let someone else do the thinking.  But If I have gone to the trouble of planning a walk and lead it, then I expect other participants to respect my desirous as long, as they are reasonable.  People will always try to help out, as they see it.  The trick is to go with the flow, but be clear that you are leading and it's not a comitee meeting.


 I recall being asked to lead a walk at short notice, in an area I had not waked before. I arrived early and actually drove the first few miles and recede the footpath off the road up on to the moor.  At the brief I joked that I had no idea where we were headed but assured everyone I would get them home for supper.  The trick then, was to confidently lead the group off in the right direction and up on to the moor, as if I lived down the lane.  During the walk I soon worked out who had local knowledge and used a few simple jestures here and there to check they were happy we where taking the right gate and such like.  There was one minor mutiny that few spotted.  I kind of forgot lunch as I hadn't planned the route. A couple of the ladies asked where we were stopping.  I suggested a tor a mile or so further on and they basically stopped where we were.  Quick as a flash I anounced this was the lunch spot.  Turns out where I had in mind was windy and I made a point of thanking the two mutineers.  Any way hope you find that tale usefull., Or at least amusing.
« Last Edit: 01:13:26, 10/07/18 by BuzyG »

Hazy81

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Re: Uncooperative walking companion
« Reply #28 on: 12:56:59, 10/07/18 »
I feel your pain.
The exact same thing happened to me when walking Hadrians Wall, annoyed me so much we quit half way and caught a bus back to Wallsend! Didn't want to talk to other hikers, didn't want to go to the pub in the evenings etc, I thought I knew him better but turns out he was pretty antisocial.


Guess you get to know someone properly when you spend 24 hrs a day with them for a few days

Doddy

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Re: Uncooperative walking companion
« Reply #29 on: 14:42:13, 10/07/18 »

I walk solo on multi day/week walks and wild camp nearly all the time, sometimes I take a while to choose a pitch, choosing with another person might take forever with the extra space required unless you split up for the night; which I have done when someone tagged along with me.
Tagging along with someone, or when joined with you, can be beneficial to you both in poor weather or at height.
I join a group on day walks. I think the issue might be that they are not all friends but walking friends there is a difference; you may well not have anything in common other than walking. Add in avoiding discussing religion, politics and lifestyle- to which there is no end. Then add in varying navigation skills, technology and that the group is made up of high achievers who supervise people during the week then adherence to the walk leaders instructions are not going to be accepted or with grumpiness if it is.