Author Topic: So....why might a mountain rescue team refuse a call-out?  (Read 2281 times)


beefy

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What was he thinking  ::)
DRIP COFFINS  :D

Lakeland Lorry

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For those who missed the original posting on Grough, about the incident, here's a link to it:


https://www.grough.co.uk/magazine/2018/06/24/rescuers-refuse-callout-to-wet-ben-nevis-walker

pdstsp

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Heard about this last week - and I think the article gives a pretty straight response.  It seems this particular walker employed zero forethought, and pretty much zero common sense and then didn't follow the professionals' advice.  I think the report shows the difficult decisions to be made by MR leaders - which is grossly unfair on them.  Just imagine the abuse if they get one wrong!

mananddog

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So many people think the MRTs are a publicly funded body like the emergency services which they can call at anytime they feel in trouble. Many MRT calls can be dealt with by advice - follow the path you came up was the advice in this - and perfectly sound. I think he expected they would run up there with a new set of waterproof for him or arrange a helicopter. I hope (but doubt) that he will feel thoroughly ashamed.

dittzzy

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Like any emergency service, they need to be available for when someone really needs them.  Imagine if they had gone out to rescue this guy, and then not been available for someone who had fallen?

I know....  I'm preaching to the converted.  O0

sussamb

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Unfortunately happens all the time in the ambulance service.   We're dealing with stuff we shouldn't be while hearing shout outs for cardiac arrests etc.  Need more education to impress upon folks their actions are causing others to die.  We shouldn't be going to nose bleeds, wasp/bee stings, stomach cramps, minor cuts etc etc  >:(
Where there's a will ...

tonyk

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We shouldn't be going to nose bleeds,  >:(
Not too sure I agree there.Many years ago I had a severe nose bleed in the middle of the night that wouldn't stop.After an hour I phoned 999 and spoke with an operator and they gave me some advice on how to stop the nose bleed.It took another hour to get it under control but by that time my limbs had started going cold and the shower room looked  like a murder scene.I am used to being self reliant,have backpacked alone for decades and treated injuries myself but this time I was scared and that was the reason I phoned 999.Would do the same again as in my 62 years I have hardly cost the NHS much money.


sussamb

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Agreed I've been to one where the lady almost died, but I was meaning more about those who have a slight bleed rather than catastrophic bleeding  ;) .  Glad yours was resolved ok  O0
Where there's a will ...

phil1960

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We had come down from Mynydd Mawr earlier and the local MRT along with an ambulance were at the start of the path from Rhyd Ddu to Y Garn, apparently someone with heat exhaustion ( but not confirmed ). For me emergencies mean just that, there are abuses of the emergency services including MRT’s, but maybe some people just don’t appreciate or are ignorant of what they are there for  :-\
Touching from a distance, further all the time.

Dyffryn Ardudwy

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Re: So....why might a mountain rescue team refuse a call-out?
« Reply #10 on: 11:47:06, 24/07/18 »
Its extremely rare for any Mountain rescue service to refuse a callout, but by what we can see, their services are being abused terribly by walkers who venture into the hills totally unprepared.
I just wonder how many people would scale any high mountain totally unprepared for a possible  break in the weather, if no mountain rescue service existed.

The majority of walkers know the MRS are there, and far too many abuse their existence.

Slightly off topic, but the same can be said for the A&E staff in every large hospital, having to endure hostile patients, mostly under the influence of alcohol.

The Uk has some of the most professional emergency staff in the World,   Why then do certain members of society take them for granted and abuse their trust and galant service.

Dare i say it, but it may be the way someone is brought up, to respect or disrespect certain groups in society.

I would have to be in dire need of assistance before i ever called for the Mountain Rescue Team out.

Maybe because their services are totally voluntary, that certain people in society abuse their services.

They are free service, so why not take advantage of their help,  even if their help is not required, its not going to cost me a penny, and they would never dare not come to my assistance  OR WOULD THEY ?
« Last Edit: 18:16:29, 24/07/18 by Dyffryn Ardudwy »

Petrolhead

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Re: So....why might a mountain rescue team refuse a call-out?
« Reply #11 on: 17:30:25, 24/07/18 »
Incredible story.

As I'm new to all this, I find it amazing that things like this are just open to the public. I mean, it's fantastic that they are but my god some people need a very stiff talking to indeed.

Surely the way around this is for the person who takes the call at MRS to have a standard thing they say along the lines of "just to make it clear, you will be assessed at the scene and if you're deemed to be ok you will be left where you are and charged the cost of the call out"

Surely then the person in trouble, or "in trouble" would make the sensible decision, or deal with the consequences of their ridiculous decision?

We're far too soft on these people I think!

jimbob

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Re: So....why might a mountain rescue team refuse a call-out?
« Reply #12 on: 17:48:29, 24/07/18 »
Incredible story.

As I'm new to all this, I find it amazing that things like this are just open to the public. I mean, it's fantastic that they are but my god some people need a very stiff talking to indeed.

Surely the way around this is for the person who takes the call at MRS to have a standard thing they say along the lines of "just to make it clear, you will be assessed at the scene and if you're deemed to be ok you will be left where you are and charged the cost of the call out"

Surely then the person in trouble, or "in trouble" would make the sensible decision, or deal with the consequences of their ridiculous decision?

We're far too soft on these people I think!
I  don't agree, because I do know people who just wouldn't call in that situation when it was absolutely the right time to do so.
In Spain they close off oaths in times of bad weather and it is publicized that call outs will cost a lot. For instance the Napoleon Route over the Pyrenees is closed between November and the end of march, and if you choose to go the other route and get caught or get into difficulties you will be charged, this is a law in Navarre.
If you are found on the closed route you will get a fine that can go up to 12.000€… If you need to be rescued, you can add the cost of the rescue party, which will be entirely yours to pay.:
 
  • 30€/h for each rescue worker
  • 65€/h for the ambulance
  • 30€/h for any other vehicle
  • 1.360€/h for air rescue
  • 1.400€/h for a rescue helicopter
  • Personally I would only agree to charges if routes and public were closed paths in times of bad weather.

    But as many members of MRS are aware that they give their time and expertise freely. If they do not want to help idiots then they will quickly leave the service.
    There is an argument that by volunteering they are allowing the Government off the hook since, in my opinion,  they should be paid for and supported by us the taxpayer. (So should the RNLI)
    Too little, too late, too bad......

    Dyffryn Ardudwy

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    Re: So....why might a mountain rescue team refuse a call-out?
    « Reply #13 on: 18:34:09, 24/07/18 »
    Far too many times have we read, that people who are totally out of their comfort zone, wearing the most inappropriate clothing for Britains mountains, expect to receive emergency, and often medical help, at no cost to themselves.
    Having never called out the Mountain rescue, i am not fully conversant with their procedure.
    Obviously they ask the coordinated grid reference for easy identification of the persons where about's, but we are not all able to read a detailed map.
    Are you injured ?, or can the casualty move ?,,  Well sorry, i am just lost, and its raining heavily, and i have forgotten to take any suitable clothing, let alone a map and have totally ignored  the clearly advertised National Park weather forecast.

    The Mountain rescue teams no doubt have considered, and rejected a call out fee for a genuine rescue, but unless they receive Government funding, members of the public will continue to abuse their free of charge service.

    Making the rare decision  not go to a persons rescue must be a very hard one indeed,   What if that person is genuinely in danger,  and due to our decision, he dies on the mountain.


    They carry out a magnificent job, every day of the year if necessary, so why do certain people flout their very existence.
    « Last Edit: 18:37:57, 24/07/18 by Dyffryn Ardudwy »

    Ridge

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    Re: So....why might a mountain rescue team refuse a call-out?
    « Reply #14 on: 19:03:57, 24/07/18 »
    I've yet to see any MRT say that they think they should charge for their service or that they would like to be run by the government.
    Over hill, over dale. Thorough brush, thorough brier....
    I do wander every where