Author Topic: [Trip report] Eyam Moor  (Read 2749 times)

Dazza

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1177
[Trip report] Eyam Moor
« on: 23:16:48, 20/05/07 »
Or I-yam or Eem depending on your preference.

Not our most sucessfully walk it must be said and as we were stone circle hunting it did include some of my least favourite vegetation - heather. It's nice to wear a sprig of it and to walk next too, it's an absolute [censored] to walk through though.

So Eyam. A well known plague village (I won't be posting shots of it, because there's plenty on the net elsewhere) who quarantined themselves due to the Black Death. The village has a good car park and excellent toilet facilities but ofcourse we parked elsewhere, taking the village in after our walk. The weather was threatening rain but for the most part was sunny and ideal walking weather.

So we start at the corner of Edge Road and Sir William Hill Road (which is more of a track). Having just got out of the car I took a couple of pictures. One looking towards Big Moor, the other Eyam moor itself. We took the path heading NNE onto Eyam moor with a view to seeing the 30ft stone circle.

Eyam moor is very much moorland, with very dense heather and few pathways. So we stuck to the footpath pretty much until we reached the area of the two other stone circles on the moor (you can see where we moved off on the OS map). These circles were pretty much submerged under thick heather so there was nothing to see here.

We headed off in the general direction of the big stone circle (which is visible on google maps btw). This is where the problems started. This area is basically a field system, so there are quite a few drainage ditches. Most of them you can easily see, quite a few have running water in them so you can hear them. I managed to find the only one that was
a) covered competely by heather and
b) dry.
Well to say I found them is a bit strong, my left foot found it and I pretty much fell down a 3 ft hole. So about 30 minutes in I had badly sprained my left ankle and strained my right foot arch. I wasn't a happy bunny but pressed on anyway as it hurt but wasn't so bad, I was wearing my new NF Hedgehogs, but under the circumstance I doubt boots would have helped.

The stone circle. Well we spent about an hour in total trying to find it (pictures on the net suggest it's easy to see). When we eventually found it it was very over grown, but the nearby cairn must have been very impressive before it collapsed or was dismantled.

So we headed down towards the road, ankle still hurting having turned it again, and took up the remainer of our route joining the road at Hazelford.

We were now in mainly footpath territory so the going was easy, although the route has some ascents as you acend to the moor level again. After following the foot path by Highlow Wood we stopped for a bit to eat at SK 22410 79675. Suitably refuelled we followed the path onwards to Highlow Brook with it's interesting and very wobbly footbridge to Stoke Ford.

At this point we were trying to head to Bretton Clough with a view to heading back to the moor later to get back to the car. We started along the path but it was covered with very thorny plants (about waist and chest high) and as it was very warm we didn't want to put our heavy jackets back on. Considering my ankle we back tracked and took the more direct route to the moor by heading East. Part way up we encountered some walkers loitering around a style (which is intensely irritating, as it blocks the style access). We crossed here and headed towards the moor itself.

At this point the skies opened, so a quick change into waterproof jackets was required. We walked along for about 15 minutes in the pouring rain, when just as suddenly the sun came out again, causing me to comment we'll see how Craghoppers and Regatta dry out then won't we.  Well they both aquitted themselves very well as we we're both dry again within 20 minutes or so.

This was the final bit of the shorter walk than we had planned, but there was still lots to see, ring cairns (a huge number of them) a view of Stanage Edge in the distance and what may be an old quarry with a cairn in it (?).

We got back to the car for tea and Hob [censored] flapjacks (far too addictive in my opinion). After my initial fall I'd turned my ankle four or five times. So I was very pleased to get back. I was even more pleased to adminster a few pints later on ;-)

The number of cairns as led me to call Eyam moor 'Stones R Us', but it wasn't as rewarding as I though it would be. That said there are some lovely views and the pain in my ankle meant I didn't enjoy it as much as I would have done normally.

Still 5 miles in about 3 hours. A booted walk next, ankle being well (it's pretty much fine now), we'll be off to Castleton or maybe revisit Stange Edge soon.

Os Map showing our route, Reproduced from Ordnance Survey map data by permission of Ordnance Survey, Crown copyright.

Dazza
« Last Edit: 23:35:26, 02/10/09 by Dazza »
Dazza
--------
These boots were made for walking so that's just what I'll do. After I've re-proofed them of course...

titaniumdude

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 344
Re: [Trip report] Eyam Moor
« Reply #1 on: 20:39:24, 21/05/07 »
Yep, those hidden ankle snapping ditches are deadly.  Bleaklow is covered in such traps.  Interesting walk Dazza.  I like routes that tie pre-historic sites together, but don't do it often enough.  Hope the ankle gets better quick.
I'm the Dude. So that's what you call me. You know, that or, uh, His Dudeness, or uh, Duder, or El Duderino if you're not into the whole brevity thing

Dazza

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1177
Re: [Trip report] Eyam Moor
« Reply #2 on: 21:21:00, 21/05/07 »
Thanks.

Apart from the odd twinge when walking up/down slopes it's been fine today.

So all being well another walk this weekend.
Dazza
--------
These boots were made for walking so that's just what I'll do. After I've re-proofed them of course...

Dazza

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1177
Re: [Trip report] Eyam Moor
« Reply #3 on: 22:29:05, 23/05/07 »
I like routes that tie pre-historic sites together, but don't do it often enough.  Hope the ankle gets better quick.

Has to be said that sometimes linking up sites can be difficult. I've yet to devise a route that takes in Arbour Low for example that doesn't include a too much road walking, especially as we do circular walks as a rule and if possible don't backtrack.

Still we'll no doubt be doing more of these type of walk. It does make a nice change, and can be very rewarding. My previous trip report hopefully shows what I mean.

I probably should type up my Bamford Moor trip as well. Similar thing really, but with lots of other diversions (Stanage Edge and Ladybower Res). Heather features heavily though as there aren't any fixed paths.
« Last Edit: 22:32:29, 23/05/07 by Dazza »
Dazza
--------
These boots were made for walking so that's just what I'll do. After I've re-proofed them of course...